Snow ball: For one last season, Twins will have shelter from the storm

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by Jean Gabler | 3/31/09

The sports announcers have been saying it for three weeks, the players have been saying it for two weeks, and I am now ready to admit it. Spring training is getting long. The only people I have not heard this from is the coaches. I guess they would always like more time to evaluate the players (and play golf). Because of the World Baseball Classic, a week was added to the spring training schedule this year, so it is longer than usual.

the knothole view is jean gabler’s blog about the minnesota twins and all things baseball.

I haven’t written in a while because I have been busy. My grandson Samuel was born a week ago on Monday and has been keeping his parents busy, so I have been having fun helping care for his older sister. I am already excited thinking about taking both of them to baseball games in a few years. I was actually watching the United States lose to Japan when I got the call that my daughter and her husband were heading to the hospital. I think it is always good to have a little baseball connection to the big events in life. My husband proposed to me at a Twins game, and I went into labor with our first child at a Twins game.

Anyway, I am ready for the season to start. The opener is next Monday, April 6, against Seattle. I heard on the radio yesterday that the game is sold out. I have my tickets. We also bought tickets for the last game of the season. If you are interested in saying goodbye to baseball at the Dome, I would suggest you get your tickets now. I am sure that whole last weekend will sell out too.

As I am writing this, it is cold and rainy outside, and I am remembering the opener last year—do you remember the snow we got that day?

It will be interesting to have outdoor baseball back! The nice thing about the Dome has been the fact that the game has never been affected by the weather. I heard someone say a few years ago that the average number of rain-outs (or snow-outs) that we will have in Minnesota is 3-6 games per season. When I think of it that way, it does seem like a small tradeoff to be able to sit outside on those wonderful summer days. Of course, that doesn’t count the number of days we will be sitting outside in the rain or in the cold watching a game. That being said, I still can’t wait for outdoor baseball.

I am not even disappointed that we won’t have a retractable roof. When a baseball field has a retractable roof, someone has to make the decision whether to close it or leave it open. From what I’ve seen on TV, it seems that those decision makers tend to err on the side of caution and close the roof on days when the weather was just questionable. We here in Minnesota will know exactly what we are getting when we head to the ballpark and, as always, we will dress appropriately!

I promised to tell you about Bobby Korecky. Here is the answer, straight from Wikipedia:

“In only his sixth major league appearance, on May 19, 2008, he made a name for himself in the Twins organization by becoming the first Twins pitcher to get a hit in an American League game since the introduction of the designated hitter, while also picking up his first major league victory in a 7-6, 12-inning victory over the Texas Rangers.”

He is still the only Twins pitcher to get a hit in the Metrodome, and with only one year left he could remain the only pitcher to do so. Do any of you remember that game? I am not sure why we lost our designated hitter, but Korecky at that time had only pitched in five major league games. This was his first major league at bat, he got a hit on the first pitch, and he was stranded at third with the bases loaded. He also went on in that game to get his first major league win.

Ah yes, the thrill of victory!


Photos, from opening day 2008, by Jean Gabler.

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