NEIGHBORHOOD NOTES | Healthy Corridor for All Community Rally to Take Place Saturday, March 5

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The excitement about the transformation and opportunities for communities along the central corridor is tempered by concern that the construction of light rail will result in the dislocation of fixed and low-income residents and small businesses. The Healthy Corridor for All coalition has announced that it will hold a community rally on Saturday, March 5, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to address these concerns. The rally will take place at Lutheran Church of the Redeemer on 285 N. Dale, St Paul, MN 55103.

At the rally, the Coalition says that it will present their Health Impact Assessment on the Light Rail Line. They will share stories, and a policy platform and will ask City Council members and the Met Council to adopt policies that will ensure that the light rail will benefit everyone.

According to TakeAction Minnesota, a coalition of progressive Minnesota organizations, there is particular concern about the impact on communities of color and small businesses along the corridor. Increases in property value along the corridor will price some residents out of their homes. Small businesses are at risk of being out-marketed by chain retail concerns. In addition, a significant decrease in parking along the corridor during the four-year construction phase will affect access to small businesses.

TakeAction Minnesota is part of the Healthy Corridor for All coalition. For more information, please contact Amee Xiong at 651-379-0754 or Amee@TakeActionMinnesota.org.

To RSVP for the Healthy Corridor for All Community Rally, click here.

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Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Collaborative.