Best Buy’s distant connection to Country Village’s woes

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During Tuesday night’s Burnsville City Council Paul Lindahl, one of the partners in the family-owned business operating Country Village apartments, gave members an inside look to the family holdings and how this building’s history of disrepair may have started with his father. Could it be the owners used the facility only has a hedge against taxes and, as some councilmembers believe, they invested the least amount possible back into the facility?

With his mother Delores, Paul Lindahl became a partner in Lindahl Properites LP in 2007, he said in responding to a question from Burnsville City Council member Dan Kealey.

“I’m guessing these issues didn’t start developing when you took ownership of the building in 2007,” Kealey said to Lindahl. ”When you purchased the building, did you inspect all the units and know the cost of bringing them up to code?” he asked.

It turns out Lindahl’s father, was the owner, and after his death it passed to his wife, Delores.
Here’s where it gets interesting: Paul’s father (sorry I don’t have his name) was the former owner of the iconic Richfield Lindahl Oldsmobile. Son Lindahl alluded to his father’s need to purchase another facility from proceeds garnered from the eminent domain transaction that made way for the new Best Buy headquarters building in Richfield. He didn’t elaborate, but I was left to speculate that the building purchase was to avoid paying capital gains taxes – but that’s purely a guess on my part.

“He purchased the property and managed it himself for several years,” Lindahl said. The property went into the estate and through probate his mother “got it as part of her portfolio and has been working on it since then.”

Kealey said it was clear to him that the problems in the complex did not just start in 2007, “they were carried over from the existing partnership.”

Just an interesting tidbit to a story that has all sorts of twists and turns – expect to hear more in January when, to avoid revocation of its rental license, work must be completed on bringing the building up to code.

If you liked this post, please read:
Country Village renters told ‘look for another place to live
Mold, mice, bad plumbing: The queasy Country Village story