Study shows Hmong face racial bias when using public lands

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In 2004, the shooting deaths of 6 Wisconsin hunters shocked the nation. The
story almost immediately became racially charged when the shooter turned out to be Hmong. Chai Vang was eventually convicted on all six counts of murder. Vang said during the trial he was provoked, when the hunters, who were white, yelled racial slurs at him.

Those issues resonated before the shootings, according to the results of new
focus group studies with Hmong residents in Wisconsin. Dave Bengston is a
social scientist with the U.S. Forest service at the northern research
station on the Saint Paul campus of the University of Minnesota. He told
KFAI’s Ann Alquist what he discovered. In 2004, the shooting deaths of 6 Wisconsin hunters shocked the nation. The
story almost immediately became racially charged when the shooter turned out to be Hmong. Chai Vang was eventually convicted on all six counts of murder. Vang said during the trial he was provoked, when the hunters, who were white, yelled racial slurs at him.

Those issues resonated before the shootings, according to the results of new
focus group studies with Hmong residents in Wisconsin. Dave Bengston is a
social scientist with the U.S. Forest service at the northern research
station on the Saint Paul campus of the University of Minnesota. He told
KFAI’s Ann Alquist what he discovered.

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