Daily Planet Headline: Leave a light on for Special Ed teachers

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MONDAY, February 4

HEADLINES

Leave a light on for Special Ed teachers
by John Fitzgerald, Minnesota 2020
When does doing your job mean not doing your job?

Ask Michelle Verna. The Rochester Kellogg Middle School special education teacher has to spend at least five hours each week filling out the copious amount of paperwork her job requires.

For our families, communities and public safety, give ex-offenders a second chance
by Charles Hallman, Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder
There are currently 155,000 Minnesota adults under some form of correctional supervision — 142,000 on probation, 4,200 on some level of supervised release, and 9,100 in prison. At least 95 percent of those in prison will eventually be released.

INSIDE THE DAILY PLANET

The future of Coldwater— will it be part of a national park?
by Susu Jeffrey, Southside Pride
The future of Coldwater Spring, currently flowing at about 90,000 gallons a day, is in the hands of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). Soon, the DOI will announce what public entity will “own” this 10,000-year-old spring. And whoever “owns” it could directly impact the future of the spring.

Mirai Nagasu is tops at U.S. Figure Skating Championships
by Tom LaVenture, Asian American Press
It was Mirai Nagasu’s first trip to the Twin Cities to compete in the 2008 U.S. Figure Skating Championships last week at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul; but you can bet she is going to have fond memories of Minnesota after taking first place in the Women Seniors category in a field that included the best skaters in the country.

Gotta love those balalaikas
by Gail Olson, The Northeaster
It seemed like there was a time when everybody’s aunt had an old one in their closet.

NEW IN VOICES

You don’t know Jack, but you do know Norm — and he’s in trouble
by Jeff Fecke, Minnesota Monitor
Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minn., is a talented and resilient politician. Your average politician would have found his career in ruins after losing a statewide race to a third-party candidate who made his name as a pro wrestler. And your average politician wouldn’t have been able to win a race after his opponent died tragically, forcing him to campaign against a substitute candidate who just happened to be a former vice president. Your average politician wouldn’t be in office right now, but your average politician isn’t Norm. So be aware that I’m not going to shovel dirt onto Norm’s political grave ever, and I’m never going to call him out of a race before it’s over.

NEW IN BLOGS

Two Saturdays
By Rosemary Ruffenach, February 2008 • Rosemary Writes •
The lure of a fresh snowfall and reasonable temperatures was irresistible—finally. I hauled out my cross-country skis and began waxing. The last two winters had brought so little snow that my skis had been relegated to a dark corner of the basement to gather cobwebs. With Christmas festivities, work obligations and temps in the polar wax range (white), they remained sulking in the corner this season until that last Saturday in January.