Best of Neighborhood News 12/12: Racism and sexism in coaching addressed in new local documentary

 

Racism and sexism in coaching addressed in new local documentary

Game On: Women Can Coach, a documentary by filmmakers Shari Lamke and Connie Clark and a co-production of the University of Minnesota Tucker Center and TPT premiered in November, and will be rebroadcast this month on the TPT MN channel (Dec. 9, 9 pm; Dec. 16, 3 am, 9 am and 3 pm). Minnesota Lynx Coach/GM Cheryl Reeve, winner of four WNBA titles, and Minnesota Basketball Hall of Fame Coach Faith Johnson Patterson, who won eight state high school titles at two different Minneapolis schools are prominently featured in the film. Filmmakers Shari Lamke and Connie Clark said, “We need to see coaches in action, as well as talk to them about the barriers and successes they’ve had in their careers.”

Find out more at Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder. Continue Reading

Best of Neighborhood News 12/6: One Minnesota governor transition advisory board assembled

One Minnesota governor transition advisory board assembled

Led by Lieutenant Governor-elect Peggy Flanagan, a team of 30 people from across Minnesota has been assembled to aid Tim Walz during his transition into the office of governor. Among others on the board, Abdirahman Kahin of Minnesota’s award-winning Afro Deli and Jaylani Hussein, a Somali native and the leader of the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) both hope to use their seats at the table to bring the perspective of the African immigrant community to the policy making of the state government. “I am excited to announce an outstanding group of people to serve on the One Minnesota Transition Advisory Board. From civil rights advocates to business owners to tribal leaders to Greater Minnesota mayors, our team worked intentionally to bring together a diverse group of people to share their expertise as we lay the groundwork for our administration. Together, we will cast a wide net across the state to ensure we truly run state government as One Minnesota,” said Peggy Flanagan. Continue Reading

How the restaurant industry normalizes wage theft

“If they’re clocked in before they’re scheduled to work, then you don’t have to pay them.” This is a tip Eddie Wu, owner and chef at Cook St. Paul, received from another local chef de cuisine from a well-known Minneapolis restaurant. “In a proud way, they were [explaining] how many hours they were able to shave off their payroll and hedge it,” said Wu. 

Wage theft occurs when workers don’t receive their legally or contractually agreed upon wages. This could be non-payment of overtime, paying below the minimum wage, not paying for all hours worked, requiring off-the-clock work, stealing or manipulating tip payouts or not paying an employee a final check. 

This type of theft within the foodservice industry can be obvious, like not paying overtime wages, but there are quieter tactics and loopholes that unscrupulous owners or managers take advantage of, often going unnoticed by workers. 

The most recent compliance sweep conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division from 2010-2012 that within nearly 9,000 full-service restaurants, approximately 84 percent of restaurants had at least one violation. This resulted in the department’s recovering approximately $57 million in back wages for about 82,000 workers. Continue Reading

Not enough: seeking and providing mental health services as a person of color in the Twin Cities

When Myisha Holley, a mother of three living in St. Paul, went through a divorce, she looked for a therapist that could help her and her daughters work through their trauma. She was clear about what she wanted from a relationship with a mental health professional. “I needed to feel like I could build a relationship with my therapist … like talking to the homegirl, without the judgment,” she said. For her daughters, Holley wanted a therapist who could be a role model while also supporting her while she parented. Continue Reading

[COMMUNITY VOICES] Non-criminal ‘technical violations’ are increasing Minnesota’s prison population

When it comes to incarceration rates, Minnesota stands out as one of the few states who is experiencing an increase in their prison population despite prison overcrowding and crime at a 50-year low. While there are multiple factors for this, a significant part of this increase is due to the incarceration of formerly released individuals for non-criminal “technical violations” of parole. According to the Department of Correction in 2017 alone, 3,391 people were returned to prison, yet 88 percent – or nearly 3,000 of those admissions – were a return without a new sentence, that is, for technical violations. A technical violation is a petty violation of supervised or conditional release (colloquially known as “parole”) which are not in themselves a misdemeanor or felony. For example, people can be violated for failure to obtain or maintain housing or employment, being late for or missing an appointment, going on social media, driving a vehicle and many other non-crimes. Continue Reading

Best of Neighborhood News 11/14: Student trans rights activists march in response to transphobia at UMN

University of Minnesota’s College Republicans group added a panel to the Washington Avenue bridge the which states that “the proposed pronoun policy mocks real social issues,” in reference to a newly proposed university gender expression policy. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, students and faculty marched across the bridge in protest to the panel and the marginalization of the transgender community that it represents. Find the full story at Minnesota Daily. Minneapolis College announces staffing changes to bridge the educational opportunity gap

The Minneapolis College Division of Equity and Inclusion announced addition of permanent staffing with the goal of increasing opportunities available to members of marginalized groups in the Twin Cities area. Continue Reading

[PHOTOS] Exuberant election night for DFL candidates and supporters

This piece is part of Twin Cities Daily Planet’s series covering the 2018 elections season. Every year we’re moving towards a possibility of a more diverse legislature. And with it, we hope comes increased opportunities for communities historically shut out of political processes and power to imagine and enact policies to create a Minnesota that benefits all its constituents. Tuesday night, several of the DFL candidates, and their supporters including St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, gathered to watch the returns and celebrate their work – and wins – at the InterContinental Saint Paul Riverfront hotel in downtown, photographed by Kelechi Uchegbu. Continue Reading

[PHOTOS] Monumental wins for Hennepin County Board of Commissioners

This piece is part of Twin Cities Daily Planet’s series covering the 2018 elections season. Every year we’re moving towards a possibility of a more diverse legislature. And with it, we hope comes increased opportunities for communities historically shut out of political processes and power to imagine and enact policies to create a Minnesota that benefits all its constituents. The election-night watch parties of Hennepin County Commissioner-elect Irene Fernando (District 2), held at La Doña Cervecería – photographed by Nancy Musinguzi – and Hennepin County Commissioner-elect Angela Conley (District 4) held at Du Nord Craft Spirits  – photographed by Anna Rajdl began in anticipation and ended in celebration. Both women are the first people of color elected to serve on the Board of Hennepin County Commissioners, which has been all white since 1852. Continue Reading

Best of Neighborhood News 11/7: City of Minneapolis recognizes Lao Minnesotan artist Kaysone Syonesa

October 10 is now known in Minneapolis as Kaysone Syonesa Day in recognition of prominent local Lao Minnesotan artist. Syonesa has been active in the local theater arts scene for years and is an accomplished actor, director and playwright. She is a close friend and mentor in her community. The recognition comes at the request of the Southeast Asian Literature Interdisciplinary Theater Arts Center. Syonesa and her family came to Minnesota after the Lao Civil War. Continue Reading

A challenge to Stanek’s incumbency in the struggle for race equity

This piece is part of Twin Cities Daily Planet’s series covering the 2018 elections season. Every year we’re moving towards a possibility of a more diverse legislature. And with it, we hope comes increased opportunities for communities historically shut out of political processes and power to imagine and enact policies to create a Minnesota that benefits all its constituents. Robert Pilot, an educator and member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, said he and many other people in the Native American community started talking about the need to replace current Hennepin County Sheriff Rich Stanek in Oct. 2016, after Stanek sent equipment and 30 deputies to Standing Rock in North Dakota. Continue Reading