THEATER | “Anon” makes the cycle of addiction and abuse feel heartbreakingly real

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One thought on “THEATER | “Anon” makes the cycle of addiction and abuse feel heartbreakingly real

  1. You all need to know that no matter the length of time you spend on stage or amount of skin you reveal, you all not only tell a story that needs to be told (and needs to be heard), but you have accomplished something that is very difficult to do: you, the actors and artistic staff, have brought talent, conviction, and a damn good story to the stage at such a caliber of unselfishness and truth that as a participant in the theatre profession, you have reminded me why the hell i do it.

    As theatre people, and what’s more, as broke theatre people, we are always jumping from gig to gig, scrounging for enough to pay for the newest versions of new headshots, revamping our resumes, working our ‘dayjobs’ that we vehemently will not allow to be our lives, and always, always networking–you all have not only brought a relevant message but for the two and half hourse I was in that theatre, I forgot. I forgot I was watching my friends. I forgot I was an actor, director, and overall critic of theatre. I know I am not over stepping my bound when I say you all allowed me to enjoy theatre the way it is supposed to be enjoyed and reminded myself and all of the theatre community of the twin cities the power of what we have claimed our lives to. Thank you so much, all of you, for this gem, for allowing me to forget, and reminding me why I slave for this profession. You all are incredible and have done an amazing thing.

    PS: If you read this and aren’t in the show, you do not have a reason to not go see this show.

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