Sports http://tcdailyplanet.net/taxonomy/term/12/feed en In defense of the Dinkytown "riots" http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/anonymous/defense-dinkytown-riots <div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Chris Iverson </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/full/14/14/2014-04-10-23.06.17.jpg" alt="" title="" width="360" height="215" class="imagecache imagecache-full imagecache-default imagecache-full_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>Unless you live under a rock, or are a rock, you’ve probably heard about the so-called “riots” that took place in Dinkytown this weekend. The riots on <a href="http://www.wtsp.com/story/sports/college/2014/04/11/minnesota-hockey-fans-riot-after-win/7600349/">Thursday</a> and <a href="http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/04/13/police-19-arrested-no-officers-injured-after-gophers-loss/">Saturday</a> were directly – maybe indirectly – caused by the Minnesota Gophers Men’s Hockey team <a href="http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=713943">winning</a> and <a href="http://btn.com/2014/04/12/ncaa-hockey-championship-minnesota-vs-union/">losing</a> on each night, respectively.<!--break--></p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.streets.mn">Streets.MN</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Streets.MN stories:</em></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://streets.mn/2014/04/13/is-the-dfl-a-pro-transit-and-environmental-party/">Does the DFL Support Transit and the Environment?</a></em></li><li><em><a href="http://streets.mn/2014/04/14/tcf-bank-to-leave-minneapolis-for-sad-warehouse/">TCF Bank to Leave Minneapolis for Sad Warehouse</a></em></li></ul></blockquote><p>On both nights, the headline-hungry local media infiltrated the scene as crowds of alcohol-fused college students scampered to see the commotion on the corner of 14th Avenue SE and 4th Street SE. On both nights, several people were arrested for what the policing community calls “<a href="https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=609.705&amp;format=pdf">unlawful assembly</a>.”</p><p>As a full disclaimer, I was present for and observing both gatherings. It is imperative that these events are no longer seen as riots. In fact, they were far from it. The word “riot”, according to Merriam Webster Dictionary, is defined as “a situation in which a large group of people behave in a violent and uncontrolled way”. If you want to see a real riot, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHAywlBxFFQ">look no further than what happened in Ukraine</a> last month. Aside from the quintessential freshman know-it-alls throwing the occasional beer bottle, nobody in Dinkytown behaved violently on either night. The mass of people infiltrating the commercial node was nothing more than a street gathering, caused by corresponding intersection sidewalks reaching a critical mass of pedestrians.</p><p>On both nights, the college bars running at maximum capacity emptied after both games. People were either cheering or sulking depending on the night, but most was calm as the sidewalks started becoming more crowded. After that, the sequence of events was similar:</p><p>2) After the game, many students head towards the corner of 4th and 14th from the bars. The narrow sidewalks on both streets quickly become filled.</p><p>3) Since cars are still allowed through, people wait for the walk signal to cross on the crowded intersections. On Saturday specifically, cops only let a few people cross at a time.</p><p>4) A group of inebriated male students, tired of the wait on the sidewalk, jump into the gutters and parking lanes of the street. More people, observing their somewhat belligerent comrades, join in the crowd.</p><p>5) Groups of people from all corners fill into the street intersection, and the “riot” mob quickly forms within a matter of seconds. People cheer their successful street invasion, begin taking pictures of the group, send them via Facebook and Snapchat and Instagram and other obscure mobile apps, and invoke the interests of their fellow Gophers sitting at their rentals around the area.</p><p>6) About 98% of the people in the crowd sing songs, dance around and capture the rare instance of being able to stand in the middle of a major intersection without vehicles endangering their safety. It is at this moment when the other 2% start causing minor havoc by shooting bottle rockets and climbing stoplights to get a better look. The riot police then come in full mace-possessing, helicopter-wielding force, and the rest is history.</p><p>Of course, the blatant, doomsday-ish, in-your-face TV and paper reporters capture and interpret the scene as true history. The rare crowd incites some onlooking, dramatic reporters to claim that the crowd was “<a href="http://www.kstp.com/article/12303/?vid=5040838&amp;v=1">nothing like they’ve ever seen</a>“, and lead another to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr9WNzY_d5Y&amp;feature=share">follow some cops as if it was a political revolution</a>. Again, for 98% of the crowd, it was a fun, interesting anomaly to participate in a harmless gathering in the middle of an open road. The 2% of the crowd that wanted to take it to the next level is what caused the cops to react, leading to 29 total arrests in the two nights.</p><p><em><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/April/2014-04-10-23.08.20.jpg" width="630" height="1053" /></em></p><p><em>I promise officer, I was just trying to get a better view!</em></p><p>The way that I see it, this rare gathering that incites a metro area to wave its proverbial finger at an entire student base is unwarranted and ignorant. When a large group of people enter a street, it’s instantly called a riot. But think about it – Isn’t large group of vehicles on a road just called a traffic jam? Why does a gathering of people incite such a different response? Don’t 98% of drivers just go about their normal commute while the 2% cause truly dangerous, life-threatening accidents?</p><p>Some people may claim that if the crowd assembled where pedestrians were allowed – Perhaps the Northrop Mall within campus – this would not have happened. I can almost guarantee that troublemaking 2% would incite the same police response that everyone saw in Dinkytown.</p><p>In my urban-leaning mind, the real problem lies in the infrastructure provided for pedestrians in the pedestrian-heavy commercial area. The percentage of street that is dedicated to vehicles is simply too high. The rest of the area for pedestrians is too small to hold a peak demand like seen this weekend and frankly, most weekend nights. Why does level of service only apply for vehicles?</p><p>At a minimum, city and county officials should invest in expanding the small sidewalks at intersections. There is plenty of space currently for concrete sidewalk bump outs to be built that would help delineate the parking lanes on each street. If officials were more progressive and ambitious, a traffic lane could be removed on 4th to allot more sidewalk space. If truly innovative, sections of 14th Avenue within the commercial district could be converted into a Nicollet-esque pedestrian mall, which would allow people to freely walk in the street on occasions not limited to sports riots.</p><p>Overall, many things could have mitigated the street gatherings in a better fashion – restricting the media’s overdramatic representation being one of them – but perhaps the riots would not have happened in the first place to the same extent if people were allowed to walk freely normally. Yes, those few rowdy sports fans would probably still light old couches on fire and cause unnecessary property damage, but the hoop-lah of it all would probably be more subdued. The abnormality of many people forming in Dinkytown would be a normal occurrence on most nights, and would not incite a large portion of the student population to post pictures to social media sites.</p><p><em>At top: "They always send the best snaps."</em></p><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/streetsmn">Streets.MN</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/88634"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/anonymous/defense-dinkytown-riots#comments CC area University District Public Safety Sports Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:05:24 +0000 Chris Iverson 88634 at http://tcdailyplanet.net 19 arrested as hundreds of police disperse crowds in Dinkytown streets after Gophers loss http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/04/13/19-arrested-hundreds-police-disperse-crowds-dinkytown-streets-after-gophers-loss <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/04/13/19-arrested-hundreds-police-disperse-crowds-dinkytown-streets-after-gophers-loss" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/13/_dsc7139_copy2.jpg" alt="" title="" width="380" height="285" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Minnesota Daily </div> </div> </div> <p>A riotous crowd filled Dinkytown for the second time in three days Saturday, following the Gophers’ loss in the NCAA Frozen Four final.<!--break--></p><p>Behavior was similar to two nights before — when the Gophers men’s hockey team beat North Dakota State in the semifinal — but this time, hundreds of police were waiting.</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.mndaily.com/blogs/newsstand/2014/04/13/storify-dinkytown-riot-2014" target="_blank">See how the 2014 Dinkytown riot unfolded on social media</a> | <a href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152053550814327.1073741867.101427194326&amp;type=1" target="_blank">View additional photos in the Facebook gallery</a></p></blockquote><p>After police pushed the initial crowd out of Dinkytown, what had escalated into a riot dispersed into skirmishes throughout University of Minnesota-area neighborhoods. Dinkytown was clear by about 1 a.m.</p><p>The commotion began quietly, with a hodgepodge group of disappointed fans spilling out of Dinkytown bars.</p><p>As the crowd grew, it seemed most were there to watch the action unfold. Some chanted “USA!” and “Let’s go Gophers!” while other went further, jumping on cars and throwing bottles at police.</p><p>At least 19 people were arrested, according to Minneapolis police.</p><p>Around 10 p.m., police in riot gear formed a perimeter along 15th Avenue Southeast, with an inner line of at least 45 officers on 14th Avenue Southeast.</p><p>Some grasped fistfuls of zip ties and others had nonlethal weapons in hand. They soon began firing into the crowd as a mounted patrol unit advanced and helicopters circled overhead, directing the crowd to disperse.</p><p>It’s unclear what police were firing, though it’s possible there was a mix of nonlethal weaponry. Multiple Minnesota Daily reporters were struck.</p><p><strong>Animosity and confusion</strong></p><p>Even after police directed the crowd to disperse, some refused to leave.</p><p>At one point, about a dozen people sat cross-legged in the street, chanting “We have the right to assemble.”</p><p>Police disagreed — almost from the beginning of the night, they’d declared the assembly unlawful.</p><p>Family social science junior Jon Kleba said he watched the game at Burrito Loco and then walked to a friend’s house. There wasn’t a clear reason to start a raucous in Dinkytown, he said.</p><p>“People like to feel they’re a part of something,” he said.</p><p>University alumnus Arif Hasan said the situation looked “brutal,” but made “a lot of sense.”</p><p>“I feel like a lot of students think they have more rights than they do in a situation like this,” he said.</p><p>Around 11:30 p.m., police pushed the crowd away from the center of Dinkytown. On side streets, people lit furniture on fire and destroyed cars.</p><p>Some bystanders were caught in the crowd and voiced confusion about how to get home, as police had blocked most major routes out of Dinkytown.</p><p>Police armed with nonlethal weapons weaved in and out of alleyways, clearing crowds that had spread into the Marcy-Holmes and Southeast Como neighborhoods.</p><p><strong>Students warned, police prepare</strong></p><p>After Thursday’s commotion, police prepared heavily for Saturday. Before the game ended, hundreds of officers had covered Dinkytown and its surrounding area.</p><p>University of Minnesota political science junior Brett Benkovics said he thought the extensive police presence may have contributed to Saturday’s raucous.</p><p>“They hyped it up,” he said. “They kind of caused it, I feel like.”</p><p>University President Eric Kaler on Friday sent an email warning students that the school had “zero tolerance” for unruly behavior and would arrest bystanders once police declared unlawful assembly.</p><p>Minneapolis police sent a release warning if "celebrations escalate into criminal behavior, the MPD will act to ensure public safety and protect property."</p><p>Freshmen Zach Plooster and Kassy Limbo were standing outside Potbelly early Saturday night.</p><p>Plooster said he didn’t think Kaler’s email would be effective.</p><p>“Not with this many kids,” Limbo said.</p><p>University spokesman Chuck Tombarge said Saturday night that police were focused on controlling the situation.</p><p>The University and Minneapolis Police will have a statement in the morning, he said.</p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A riotous crowd filled Dinkytown for the second time in three days Saturday, following the Gophers’ loss in the NCAA Frozen Four final.<!--break--></p><p>Behavior was similar to two nights before — when the Gophers men’s hockey team beat North Dakota State in the semifinal — but this time, hundreds of police were waiting.</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://www.mndaily.com/blogs/newsstand/2014/04/13/storify-dinkytown-riot-2014" target="_blank">See how the 2014 Dinkytown riot unfolded on social media</a> | <a href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152053550814327.1073741867.101427194326&amp;type=1" target="_blank">View additional photos in the Facebook gallery</a></p></blockquote><p>After police pushed the initial crowd out of Dinkytown, what had escalated into a riot dispersed into skirmishes throughout University of Minnesota-area neighborhoods. Dinkytown was clear by about 1 a.m.</p><p>The commotion began quietly, with a hodgepodge group of disappointed fans spilling out of Dinkytown bars.</p><p>As the crowd grew, it seemed most were there to watch the action unfold. Some chanted “USA!” and “Let’s go Gophers!” while other went further, jumping on cars and throwing bottles at police.</p><p>At least 19 people were arrested, according to Minneapolis police.</p><p>Around 10 p.m., police in riot gear formed a perimeter along 15th Avenue Southeast, with an inner line of at least 45 officers on 14th Avenue Southeast.</p><p>Some grasped fistfuls of zip ties and others had nonlethal weapons in hand. They soon began firing into the crowd as a mounted patrol unit advanced and helicopters circled overhead, directing the crowd to disperse.</p><p>It’s unclear what police were firing, though it’s possible there was a mix of nonlethal weaponry. Multiple Minnesota Daily reporters were struck.</p><p><strong>Animosity and confusion</strong></p><p>Even after police directed the crowd to disperse, some refused to leave.</p><p>At one point, about a dozen people sat cross-legged in the street, chanting “We have the right to assemble.”</p><p>Police disagreed — almost from the beginning of the night, they’d declared the assembly unlawful.</p><p>Family social science junior Jon Kleba said he watched the game at Burrito Loco and then walked to a friend’s house. There wasn’t a clear reason to start a raucous in Dinkytown, he said.</p><p>“People like to feel they’re a part of something,” he said.</p><p>University alumnus Arif Hasan said the situation looked “brutal,” but made “a lot of sense.”</p><p>“I feel like a lot of students think they have more rights than they do in a situation like this,” he said.</p><p>Around 11:30 p.m., police pushed the crowd away from the center of Dinkytown. On side streets, people lit furniture on fire and destroyed cars.</p><p>Some bystanders were caught in the crowd and voiced confusion about how to get home, as police had blocked most major routes out of Dinkytown.</p><p>Police armed with nonlethal weapons weaved in and out of alleyways, clearing crowds that had spread into the Marcy-Holmes and Southeast Como neighborhoods.</p><p><strong>Students warned, police prepare</strong></p><p>After Thursday’s commotion, police prepared heavily for Saturday. Before the game ended, hundreds of officers had covered Dinkytown and its surrounding area.</p><p>University of Minnesota political science junior Brett Benkovics said he thought the extensive police presence may have contributed to Saturday’s raucous.</p><p>“They hyped it up,” he said. “They kind of caused it, I feel like.”</p><p>University President Eric Kaler on Friday sent an email warning students that the school had “zero tolerance” for unruly behavior and would arrest bystanders once police declared unlawful assembly.</p><p>Minneapolis police sent a release warning if "celebrations escalate into criminal behavior, the MPD will act to ensure public safety and protect property."</p><p>Freshmen Zach Plooster and Kassy Limbo were standing outside Potbelly early Saturday night.</p><p>Plooster said he didn’t think Kaler’s email would be effective.</p><p>“Not with this many kids,” Limbo said.</p><p>University spokesman Chuck Tombarge said Saturday night that police were focused on controlling the situation.</p><p>The University and Minneapolis Police will have a statement in the morning, he said.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Minnesota Daily </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/88581"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/04/13/19-arrested-hundreds-police-disperse-crowds-dinkytown-streets-after-gophers-loss#comments CC area University District Public Safety Sports Sun, 13 Apr 2014 19:47:27 +0000 Staff 88581 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Officials warn 'zero tolerance' after rowdy post-game Dinkytown crowd, law enforcement preparations underway for NCAA final Saturday http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/04/11/officials-warn-zero-tolerance-after-rowdy-post-game-dinkytown-crowd <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/04/11/officials-warn-zero-tolerance-after-rowdy-post-game-dinkytown-crowd" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/11/bb_riot_copy.jpg" alt="" title="" width="380" height="285" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Minnesota Daily </div> </div> </div> <p>A last-second goal from the Gophers men’s hockey team Thursday night sent Dinkytown into a three-hour frenzy as hundreds of rowdy people flooded the streets following the semifinal win.<!--break--></p><p>Riot-gear clad Minneapolis and University of Minnesota police and National Guard were there to meet them, lining up and starting to clear the streets soon after it started.</p><p>“The actions of a few people in Dinkytown last night unfortunately marred the victory of our Gopher men’s hockey team,” President Eric Kaler wrote in an email to students on Friday afternoon.</p><p>“These actions are unacceptable and must not be repeated.”</p><p>Thursday night was just the semifinal.</p><p>The Gophers will take on Union in the NCAA final Saturday. That game, like Thursday’s, will be played in Philadelphia and the Gophers should be favored.</p><p>“It’s the semifinals, so I have no idea what to expect for the finals,” said University architectural design junior Jeff Wilson, who came to Dinkytown from his Stadium Village apartment to watch.</p><p>Kaler wrote in his email that any destructive behavior will be met with “zero tolerance.”</p><p>University of Minnesota administrators will hold a press conference Friday afternoon.</p><p>“We’re not discussing any of our plans or procedures for Saturday, just for safety reasons,” said Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder.</p><p>“We developed the plan with the Minneapolis police department and it’s been our responsibility," University police chief Greg Hestness said. "We’ve been working on it for six weeks to two months when the Gophers started looking good. We’ve done it previous years.”</p><p>Thursday night, crowd members jumped on squad cars, climbed light posts and threw bottles at police, leading officers in riot gear to disperse the crowd, occasionally using tear gas and mace.</p><p>Officials arrested 10 University students. All but one were released as of early Friday afternoon, and most posted a $78 bail, according to the Hennepin County Sheriff’s jail roster.</p><p>“It was the violent behavior towards other people and towards officers and the damage to property,” Elder said.</p><p>Two Minneapolis police officers were taken to Hennepin County Medical Center for medical attention. Most of the arrests were for unlawful assembly, some for disorderly conduct and one for public urination.</p><p>When three or more people gather with intent to disturb the peace or break laws, it’s considered unlawful assembly, according to Minnesota statute.</p><p>Once declared, police can arrest students for not complying. Under the Student Conduct Code, punishments could include a warning statement, expulsion or revocation of a degree.</p><p>“Just being present and watching a riot is, in itself, violation of the Student Conduct Code,” Kaler wrote.</p><p>Minneapolis police sent a press release Friday stating that anyone told to disperse from an assembly that has been declared unlawful must immediately leave the area, and failure to do so may result in an arrest.</p><p>Minnesota senior defenseman Jake Parenteau said it’s important to note the team is still one win away from the title and fans should celebrate in a responsible way.</p><p>“We haven’t won the whole thing yet,” he said.</p><p><strong>Post-goal celebrations</strong></p><p>Thursday’s commotion started just after 10 p.m. on Thursday when senior defenseman Justin Holl netted a goal with 0.6 seconds left, giving the Gophers a win over North Dakota.</p><p>Just after 11 p.m., a few people began climbing a light pole near the intersection of 4th Street and 14th Avenue Southeast as a large mob swelled, with some trying to flip a police car, shooting off bottle rockets and crowd-surfing.</p><p>Police began using tear gas around 11:15 p.m. and some people remained on the scene into the early hours of Friday morning. A State Patrol helicopter flew overhead, watching the area until around midnight.</p><p>Phil Cross, a criminology senior and Espresso Royale barista, said he had to choose between tending to customers and people outside.</p><p>“I know tear gas is probably extremely painful, but I didn’t feel like there was a whole lot I could do for them,” he said.</p><p>He had a bowl of water ready for anyone sprayed with the chemical.</p><p>In more than a year at the coffee shop, Cross said he’s never seen Dinkytown streets so out of hand.</p><p>Cross said he thought it was unfortunate that most of the crowd didn’t appear to take police seriously.</p><p>University psychology student Shaili Zappa said she watched a man on rollerblades in front of the Library Bar get stopped by officers, put in a headlock and escorted into a squad car.</p><p>“He wasn’t really doing anything bad at all,” she said.</p><p>Former Gophers defenseman and current member of the NHL’s Washington Capitals Nate Schmidt said the celebrations reflect the state’s passion for the sport. Still, he said it’s important to take precautions.</p><p>“I think fans should enjoy themselves,” he said, “but that doesn’t have to come at the [expense] of other people’s safety or the city or the area itself."</p><p><em>Jessica Lee, Dane Mizutani, Meghan Holden, Cody Nelson and Megan Ryan contributed to this report.</em></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A last-second goal from the Gophers men’s hockey team Thursday night sent Dinkytown into a three-hour frenzy as hundreds of rowdy people flooded the streets following the semifinal win.<!--break--></p><p>Riot-gear clad Minneapolis and University of Minnesota police and National Guard were there to meet them, lining up and starting to clear the streets soon after it started.</p><p>“The actions of a few people in Dinkytown last night unfortunately marred the victory of our Gopher men’s hockey team,” President Eric Kaler wrote in an email to students on Friday afternoon.</p><p>“These actions are unacceptable and must not be repeated.”</p><p>Thursday night was just the semifinal.</p><p>The Gophers will take on Union in the NCAA final Saturday. That game, like Thursday’s, will be played in Philadelphia and the Gophers should be favored.</p><p>“It’s the semifinals, so I have no idea what to expect for the finals,” said University architectural design junior Jeff Wilson, who came to Dinkytown from his Stadium Village apartment to watch.</p><p>Kaler wrote in his email that any destructive behavior will be met with “zero tolerance.”</p><p>University of Minnesota administrators will hold a press conference Friday afternoon.</p><p>“We’re not discussing any of our plans or procedures for Saturday, just for safety reasons,” said Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder.</p><p>“We developed the plan with the Minneapolis police department and it’s been our responsibility," University police chief Greg Hestness said. "We’ve been working on it for six weeks to two months when the Gophers started looking good. We’ve done it previous years.”</p><p>Thursday night, crowd members jumped on squad cars, climbed light posts and threw bottles at police, leading officers in riot gear to disperse the crowd, occasionally using tear gas and mace.</p><p>Officials arrested 10 University students. All but one were released as of early Friday afternoon, and most posted a $78 bail, according to the Hennepin County Sheriff’s jail roster.</p><p>“It was the violent behavior towards other people and towards officers and the damage to property,” Elder said.</p><p>Two Minneapolis police officers were taken to Hennepin County Medical Center for medical attention. Most of the arrests were for unlawful assembly, some for disorderly conduct and one for public urination.</p><p>When three or more people gather with intent to disturb the peace or break laws, it’s considered unlawful assembly, according to Minnesota statute.</p><p>Once declared, police can arrest students for not complying. Under the Student Conduct Code, punishments could include a warning statement, expulsion or revocation of a degree.</p><p>“Just being present and watching a riot is, in itself, violation of the Student Conduct Code,” Kaler wrote.</p><p>Minneapolis police sent a press release Friday stating that anyone told to disperse from an assembly that has been declared unlawful must immediately leave the area, and failure to do so may result in an arrest.</p><p>Minnesota senior defenseman Jake Parenteau said it’s important to note the team is still one win away from the title and fans should celebrate in a responsible way.</p><p>“We haven’t won the whole thing yet,” he said.</p><p><strong>Post-goal celebrations</strong></p><p>Thursday’s commotion started just after 10 p.m. on Thursday when senior defenseman Justin Holl netted a goal with 0.6 seconds left, giving the Gophers a win over North Dakota.</p><p>Just after 11 p.m., a few people began climbing a light pole near the intersection of 4th Street and 14th Avenue Southeast as a large mob swelled, with some trying to flip a police car, shooting off bottle rockets and crowd-surfing.</p><p>Police began using tear gas around 11:15 p.m. and some people remained on the scene into the early hours of Friday morning. A State Patrol helicopter flew overhead, watching the area until around midnight.</p><p>Phil Cross, a criminology senior and Espresso Royale barista, said he had to choose between tending to customers and people outside.</p><p>“I know tear gas is probably extremely painful, but I didn’t feel like there was a whole lot I could do for them,” he said.</p><p>He had a bowl of water ready for anyone sprayed with the chemical.</p><p>In more than a year at the coffee shop, Cross said he’s never seen Dinkytown streets so out of hand.</p><p>Cross said he thought it was unfortunate that most of the crowd didn’t appear to take police seriously.</p><p>University psychology student Shaili Zappa said she watched a man on rollerblades in front of the Library Bar get stopped by officers, put in a headlock and escorted into a squad car.</p><p>“He wasn’t really doing anything bad at all,” she said.</p><p>Former Gophers defenseman and current member of the NHL’s Washington Capitals Nate Schmidt said the celebrations reflect the state’s passion for the sport. Still, he said it’s important to take precautions.</p><p>“I think fans should enjoy themselves,” he said, “but that doesn’t have to come at the [expense] of other people’s safety or the city or the area itself."</p><p><em>Jessica Lee, Dane Mizutani, Meghan Holden, Cody Nelson and Megan Ryan contributed to this report.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Minnesota Daily </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/88539"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/04/11/officials-warn-zero-tolerance-after-rowdy-post-game-dinkytown-crowd#comments CC area University District Public Safety Sports Fri, 11 Apr 2014 19:59:22 +0000 Dane Mizutani and Jessica Lee 88539 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Privatize intercollegiate sports http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/emilio-degrazia/privatize-intercollegiate-sports <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/emilio-degrazia" title="View user profile.">Emilio DeGrazia</a> </div> </div> </div> <p>“Have we gone insane?” is what a Minnesota cattle farmer probably not much interested in March Madness asked. His question was a reaction to the news that Jerry Kill, the University of Minnesota football coach, had his $1,2000,000 salary increased by an extra $2,100,000, plus perks, for guiding the Gophers to eight wins and five losses during the 2013 season. Maybe winning isn’t everything. It certainly isn’t for everyone.<!--break--></p><p>No doubt Coach Kill is a nice enough guy and competent enough at what he does. And he didn’t complain about the salary bump he received. Ohio State’s Urban Meyer makes $4,600,000, plus perks, and he’s in the same league.</p><p>It’s hard to imagine anyone in his or her right mind seriously believing that the NCAA Division One big money sports––football, basketball, hockey––have anything but a tendril connection to a university’s higher education missions. There are several fine student-athletes who get excellent grades while working very hard at their sports. The graduation rate for athletes and non-athletes is comparable, though the amount of money it takes to get a student-athlete a degree is hidden in a murk of red ink. But it seems obvious that the hazards of football seem well out of line with what health educators teach, and that at the D-1 level students need to learn how to keep their classes from interfering with their serious sports jobs.</p><p>Student-athletes must suspect they’re part of an entertainment industry. Coach Kill was honest enough to fess up to it, and he left the impression that as a newcomer to the industry his new salary represents his fair market value.</p><p>But some of the people responsible for overseeing the numbers at D-1 higher educational institutions maybe need some refresher courses in elementary arithmetic. Only 23 of the 228 NCAA D-1 sports programs generated enough income to cover expenses in 2012, and 16 of the 23 winners received subsidies by way of student fees and university and state funds. The other 205 were losers, as were the donors and tax payers who picked up the tab. Losing seasons are a financial trend for most NCAA schools.</p><p>Meanwhile, the NCAA as an organization quietly showed a profit of $71,000,000 for 2012. Rather noisily state governments try to figure out how to pay their bills.</p><p>It’s time to turn these big-time sports teams into what they really are: Businesses. Because I’m addicted to thrift I think they should get off an unsustainable welfare system. Privatize them.</p><p>I’m not a spoil-sport. I know that millions love to cheer for the logos and colors on the laundry they love. Big time sports are major rituals that stimulate a deep need for community identity. As a kid in Michigan I grew up loving the Spartans and Wolverines, and I got my graduate degrees as a Buckeye at Ohio State, and when I married a Nebraska woman I learned to love Cornhuskers, and because I pay taxes in Wisconsin I have a Badger in me, and because my daughter is a student at the University of Iowa I’m a Hawkeye too. As a Minnesotan I’m a devout Gopher, for reasons I can’t fully explain. I want everyone to win.</p><p>A lot of people are not ready to give up big-time collegiate sports yet, even when they go home from a game losers again.</p><p>Turning big-time collegiate sports programs into for-profit enterprises should especially appeal to fiscal conservatives who have a passion to cut taxes and privatize the public schools.</p><p>Here’s my business plan: Turn the big-time intercollegiate sports over to private entrepreneurs willing to invest in new business ventures. Let entrepreneurs, rather than participating schools, run them as private for-profit businesses. They buy the naming, branding, and concessions rights from universities. They lease the cheerleaders and marching bands. They lease university facilities, or construct their own. They pay all travel and advertising expenses. They cut their own TV and bowl game deals. They hire the coaches and other managers. They pay the bills and enjoy the profits that come rolling in. Private investors could get involved, and maybe Wall Street too.</p><p>Could these new business enterprises––let’s call them clubs––still be considered intercollegiate sports? A few rules would give them permission to say yes. The players would be recruited from the pool of graduating high school student-athletes, as they are now. They would have five years to fulfill four years of service on the playing field. They would be required to establish student identity by taking at least one class at the university whose logo they wear during games.</p><p>Nothing much would change, except the ownership of teams, business plans, and bookkeeping responsibilities. Gopher fans could continue to cheer for players wearing Gopher uniforms, and everyone could continue to have a good time.</p><p>Currently there’s some talk about student-athletes unionizing. That’s an issue players could work out with management, maybe after some discussion about salaries for coaches and club executives. Clubs, as free enterprise businesses, could make millions, or not. And if not, owners could downsize or apply other lean strategies.</p><p>Already there are rumors about the University of Minnesota needing $190,000,000 for improved practice facilities. Experts feel that the UM will not be able to compete without the upgrades. They’re very probably right. Why would an eighteen year-old super athlete high school recruit want anything but the latest and best high-tech facilities? Why not go to Penn State instead?</p><p>Tim Dahlberg, sports writer for the AP, says, “That’s the way things are in big-time college athletics, where the rich are getting richer. Hard not to profit when the labor is free.” Hard not to profit when public university athletic programs are bailed out by student fees and tax dollars.</p><p>I’m with the cattle farmer from western Minnesota. Why play this game? “Have we gone insane?”</p><p>Four or five times a year I get a call from sweet-voiced students at my alma mater Ohio State. They want me to send OSU money because there’s never enough to go around. I plead with them to spread the word: For starters, I tell the voices on the line, cut the coaching salaries in half. Call me again after you begin there.</p><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/downstream">Downstream</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/partners/downstream">Downstream</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/88118"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/emilio-degrazia/privatize-intercollegiate-sports#comments Business Education Sports Mon, 31 Mar 2014 20:30:45 +0000 88118 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Northsider Brian Gregg on skiing in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/03/28/northsider-brian-gregg-skiing-2014-winter-olympics-sochi <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/03/28/northsider-brian-gregg-skiing-2014-winter-olympics-sochi" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/28/greg1.png" alt="" title="" width="380" height="285" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/gail-olson" title="View user profile.">Gail Olson</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> North News </div> </div> </div> <p>How was Sochi?</p><p>Absolutely beautiful, according to Northsider Brian Gregg, who skied in three events at the 2014 Olympic Games. Although his last event was Feb. 23, he hasn’t returned home yet, because he’s skiing in Alaska. Last week, however, when NorthNews caught up with him by phone, he shared some of his Olympic experiences.<!--break--></p><p>Gregg said his team took a chartered plane from Munich to Russia. When they arrived in Sochi, each athlete was assigned to a village. There were three villages: the Coastal, which housed the ice skaters and others; the Mountain, where the alpine skiers stayed, and the Endurance, where the cross country skiers lived. “The Endurance was like a luxury spa, and was the nicest of them all,” he said. “It was on top of the mountain and you had to take a gondola to get there. Maybe after the Olympics, they’ll turn it into a hotel.</p><p>“It was probably one of the most beautiful venues I’ve ever been to, with its panoramic views,” Gregg said. “It was amazing to think that every single part of it was built just for the Olympics. Seven years ago nothing existed here.” In addition to the buildings, the Russians also put in a new road, he added.</p><p>“Our room was really nice,” he said. “You heard all kinds or horror stories [about the conditions] but we didn’t see that. There was some last minute work going on, but the media really played up the negative things.”</p><p>When asked about security at the games, he said, “We were lucky, they tried to streamline security and check in for the athletes. We were quite protected up on the mountain, and we felt extremely safe.</p><p>“Everyone I met was incredibly friendly,” he added. “The volunteers wore colorful coats so you could identify them. Most of them were Russians, although some were from Croatia. It was fun to talk to them. They thought it was pretty cool to be part of the Olympics. My favorite quote from one of them was, ‘Man, you couldn’t pay me to work this hard!’”</p><p>When asked about the weather, Gregg said, “It was quite warm. I raced in t-shirts at the last two events. It was beautiful to be up there as a spectator. For the athletes, they did something to prepare the tracks so the snow didn’t break down.”</p><p>(News reports about the games said that temperatures rose to nearly 50 degrees on Sunday, Feb. 23, which made the 31-mile men’s 50-kilometer freestyle race particularly challenging. At the time, Gregg told reporters, “My legs were a little bit heavy, so I just couldn’t quite be on that pace. This is the race I’ve been focusing on. Overall, I felt pretty good.”)</p><p>Gregg finished 51st in the 50K, and was the second American to cross the finish line. He said between 60 and 65 people competed in the race. He finished 47th in both the 15 kilometer classic start and the 30 kilometer duathalon. “One of the real highlights for me was that I was not expected to get the 15K classic start, but the 30K went well for me and I did. That was the day my family arrived. Other guys gave me their extra spectator passes so my whole family could get in. They rode the gondola up the mountain. [When I raced] I could hear them all cheering: my mom, dad, brother, sister, and sister-in-law.”</p><p>His wife, Caitlin Gregg, didn’t make the trip to Sochi, although Brian said she had come close to qualifying for the Olympic team. She stayed home, training for another race. On Feb. 22, Caitlin won first place in the women’s 50K skate event at the Birkebiner race, in Cable, Wisconsin. (The Birkebiner, by the way, is the largest cross country ski event in North America.)</p><p>Brian said that Caitlin had competed in the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, but they hadn’t been able to share that Olympic experience, either. “It was a tough thing,” he said. “I really wanted to go and cheer her on in Vancouver, but I had to train. Racing is how we earn our living, by getting sponsors and winning prize money.”</p><p>At least when she was racing in 2010, he said, “I could watch them live and be able to talk to her quickly. But in 2014, we were half a world apart.”</p><p>He said they are both looking toward the future and the 2018 Olympics, but now are “immediately anticipating” the World Championships in 2015 in Sweden.</p><p>When they’re back home in Minneapolis, the active couple stays busy by—among other things--working with kids at the Jerry Gamble Boys and Girls Club, where they have volunteered for the past four years.</p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>How was Sochi?</p><p>Absolutely beautiful, according to Northsider Brian Gregg, who skied in three events at the 2014 Olympic Games. Although his last event was Feb. 23, he hasn’t returned home yet, because he’s skiing in Alaska. Last week, however, when NorthNews caught up with him by phone, he shared some of his Olympic experiences.<!--break--></p><p>Gregg said his team took a chartered plane from Munich to Russia. When they arrived in Sochi, each athlete was assigned to a village. There were three villages: the Coastal, which housed the ice skaters and others; the Mountain, where the alpine skiers stayed, and the Endurance, where the cross country skiers lived. “The Endurance was like a luxury spa, and was the nicest of them all,” he said. “It was on top of the mountain and you had to take a gondola to get there. Maybe after the Olympics, they’ll turn it into a hotel.</p><p>“It was probably one of the most beautiful venues I’ve ever been to, with its panoramic views,” Gregg said. “It was amazing to think that every single part of it was built just for the Olympics. Seven years ago nothing existed here.” In addition to the buildings, the Russians also put in a new road, he added.</p><p>“Our room was really nice,” he said. “You heard all kinds or horror stories [about the conditions] but we didn’t see that. There was some last minute work going on, but the media really played up the negative things.”</p><p>When asked about security at the games, he said, “We were lucky, they tried to streamline security and check in for the athletes. We were quite protected up on the mountain, and we felt extremely safe.</p><p>“Everyone I met was incredibly friendly,” he added. “The volunteers wore colorful coats so you could identify them. Most of them were Russians, although some were from Croatia. It was fun to talk to them. They thought it was pretty cool to be part of the Olympics. My favorite quote from one of them was, ‘Man, you couldn’t pay me to work this hard!’”</p><p>When asked about the weather, Gregg said, “It was quite warm. I raced in t-shirts at the last two events. It was beautiful to be up there as a spectator. For the athletes, they did something to prepare the tracks so the snow didn’t break down.”</p><p>(News reports about the games said that temperatures rose to nearly 50 degrees on Sunday, Feb. 23, which made the 31-mile men’s 50-kilometer freestyle race particularly challenging. At the time, Gregg told reporters, “My legs were a little bit heavy, so I just couldn’t quite be on that pace. This is the race I’ve been focusing on. Overall, I felt pretty good.”)</p><p>Gregg finished 51st in the 50K, and was the second American to cross the finish line. He said between 60 and 65 people competed in the race. He finished 47th in both the 15 kilometer classic start and the 30 kilometer duathalon. “One of the real highlights for me was that I was not expected to get the 15K classic start, but the 30K went well for me and I did. That was the day my family arrived. Other guys gave me their extra spectator passes so my whole family could get in. They rode the gondola up the mountain. [When I raced] I could hear them all cheering: my mom, dad, brother, sister, and sister-in-law.”</p><p>His wife, Caitlin Gregg, didn’t make the trip to Sochi, although Brian said she had come close to qualifying for the Olympic team. She stayed home, training for another race. On Feb. 22, Caitlin won first place in the women’s 50K skate event at the Birkebiner race, in Cable, Wisconsin. (The Birkebiner, by the way, is the largest cross country ski event in North America.)</p><p>Brian said that Caitlin had competed in the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, but they hadn’t been able to share that Olympic experience, either. “It was a tough thing,” he said. “I really wanted to go and cheer her on in Vancouver, but I had to train. Racing is how we earn our living, by getting sponsors and winning prize money.”</p><p>At least when she was racing in 2010, he said, “I could watch them live and be able to talk to her quickly. But in 2014, we were half a world apart.”</p><p>He said they are both looking toward the future and the 2018 Olympics, but now are “immediately anticipating” the World Championships in 2015 in Sweden.</p><p>When they’re back home in Minneapolis, the active couple stays busy by—among other things--working with kids at the Jerry Gamble Boys and Girls Club, where they have volunteered for the past four years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 North News </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/88015"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/03/28/northsider-brian-gregg-skiing-2014-winter-olympics-sochi#comments Global/Local Sports Fri, 28 Mar 2014 18:40:14 +0000 88015 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Why stadium support was an acceptable progressive compromise http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/grace-kelly/why-stadium-support-was-acceptable-progressive-compromise <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/grace-kelly" title="View user profile.">Grace Kelly</a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How could a progressive have supported building the stadium? This question is asked by <a href="http://schultzstake.blogspot.com/">Professor David Schultz </a>and others. What Schultz does not know is that the issue was not enthusiastically supported, it was accepted with great pain. Schultz, being an outside commentator, could not know this. I was in the middle of the discussion.<!--break--></p><p>For Progressives that question was whether one can ever compromise or whether one embraces absolute values.</p><p>Here is what made the case for an acceptable compromise:</p><p>Minnesota was badly in need of stimulus. At the time of this decision, power was split between a Democratic Governor and Republican-controlled Legislature. A stadium was possibly the only building project that both Republicans and Democrats could support. Remember the possible alternatives are like Polymet that poisons our water for 360 low-paying jobs. I would gladly pay more in taxes to build a stadium in Northern Minnesota to keep out all copper sulfide mining.</p><p>A wise state senator told me his reasoning for supporting the stadium. In addition to the stimulus reason, there is the reason that no state has ever successfully resisted building a new stadium. In all cases, the stadium supporters eventually won. Building a stadium in the economic recession meant the lowest cost that we would ever get. Buying on sale makes great economic sense.</p><p>Another person pointed out that having a great stadium makes a Minneapolis, a “destination” city – a place one goes to. Being a destination city means more cash inflow. Proof that the stadium attracts more cash-flow than its’ costs is hard to find. Yet Minnesota is doing better than other states.</p><p>In this state, Progressives govern, going for every incremental step. It made sense to support building the stadium. But when the stadium support passed, there was no wild cheering. Instead the passage was marked by a funeral-like silence. We, Progressives did what we had to and we don’t like it. For better choices, we need to always turn out the Democratic vote.</p><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/minnesota-progressive-project">Minnesota Progressive Project</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/partners/minnesota-progressive-project">Minnesota Progressive Project</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/87908"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"><li>The last two sentences don't make sense. Democratic party support was awesome, in a bad way, for this breach of the Minneapolis City Charter. The Mpls City Council supported it, even some who voted against it. (Betsy Hodges did the expedient thing. She was anointed by the scoundrel RT Rybak, so what else can one expect?) Mark Dayton, the most visible Democrat in the state, couldn't do enough to push it, having secret meetings with the Wilfs, and licking their boots at every opportunity. What is truly appalling is that he had the nerve to call it the "People's Stadium". That was a direct attack on the decent and thoughtful, and most of all, sane, voters of our city. I could have a little pity for him prior to that for his obvious problems, but what a slap in the face the "People's Stadium" is. If you think you can, answer this question: When will the referendum promised in our City Charter be applicable? You will not, because you cannot, answer this. - by Janet Nye on Thu, 03/27/2014 - 11:47am</li></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/grace-kelly/why-stadium-support-was-acceptable-progressive-compromise#comments Vikings stadium Minnesota Politics & Policy Sports Wed, 26 Mar 2014 16:34:51 +0000 87908 at http://tcdailyplanet.net I lost a billion dollars today http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/chuck-turchick/i-lost-billion-dollars-today <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/chuck-turchick" title="View user profile.">Chuck Turchick</a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I lost a billion dollars today.</p> <p>I've never lost that much in a day, so I don't know how I'm supposed to feel. But it was sunny and gorgeous outside, so I know I don't feel as bad as I should.</p> <p>Yup, in the very first game of the Warren Buffett one-in-a-quintillion perfect men's basketball bracket, I blew it. Unbelievably, Dayton beat Ohio State. I voted for Woody Hayes' Ohio State because I didn't like how Dayton forced the Vikings' stadium on us. I should have known better; always follow the money.</p> <p>I checked at the U's Coffman Union lost and found, but no one turned in my&nbsp;billion dollars&nbsp;there. So I'm posting this in the hopes that if one of you found it, you could leave a comment and tell me how to get in touch with you. I can ride my bike right over.</p> <p>Wait, my bike needs a repair job.</p> <p>To tell the truth, I didn't&nbsp;fill out a&nbsp;Buffett bracket. You needed a mobile phone number to enter, and I don't have one of those. But still, if you find my money, please leave a comment.</p> <p>Thanks.</p> <div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/node/26963">A Parallel Universe</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/partners/parallel-universe">A Parallel Universe</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/87725"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/chuck-turchick/i-lost-billion-dollars-today#comments NCAA Basketball Warren Buffet Lifestyle Sports Sat, 22 Mar 2014 00:18:02 +0000 87725 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Lacrosse clinics teach indigenous culture and engage community http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/03/12/lacrosse-clinics-teach-indigenous-culture-and-engage-community <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/03/12/lacrosse-clinics-teach-indigenous-culture-and-engage-community" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/12/lacrosse_clinics_teach_culture_and_engage_community_2.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jamie-keith" title="View user profile.">Jamie Keith</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Circle </div> </div> </div> <p>Indigenous Lax kicked off its first lacrosse clinic on Feb. 15 with special guest speaker and Edmonton Rush player Jeremy Thompson (Onondaga). He also plays for the Iroquois Nationals, is a Nike N7 Ambassador and the co-star of a documentary titled, “The Medicine Game.” He shared his knowledge and experiences with 30 Native youth representing the Arapaho, Blackfoot, Dakota, Ho-Chunk, Lakota, Ojibwe, Omaha, Potawatomi and Yakama nations.<!--break--></p><p align="left">The goal of these introductory clinics is two-fold: introduce Native youth to the history and significance the game has to many tribal communities; and to teach them the foundational skills they need to compete in lacrosse leagues in the Twin Cities.</p><p align="left">“Both Native and non-Native [people] locally seem to think the sport is for and began with White Americans from elite communities and schools,” Clinic Director Shane Thompson (Odawa/Seneca) said. “This is far from the truth.”</p><p align="left">Lacrosse is one of the oldest sports in North America. According to oral history passed on to Jeremy Thompson, “lacrosse has been played for thousands of years and the first game was played by the animals.” He went on to elaborate that the game between the animals relates to today by acknowledging that every player has a role regardless of speed, strength or size.</p><p align="left">“It's a collective learning journey because I myself don't know the whole history of it locally, but somebody does and we're trying to get those people to talk to our kids about it and offer a different perspective,” Shane Thompson said.</p><p align="left">To help educate youth about the history of lacrosse, Shane Thompson plans to bring in a different guest speaker each week. In addition to Jeremy Thompson, Dan Ninham (Oneida) from Minnesota Ojibwe Lacrosse offered his perspectives about the traditional game to the group at the Feb. 23 clinic. Future presenters include Cherokee author and lacrosse enthusiast Art Coulson and Ojibwe artist Robert DesJarlait.</p><p align="left">In addition to introducing youth to the historical and cultural significance of the sport, Indigenous Lax aims to increase wellness in the community by promoting fitness.</p><p align="left">“We're hoping that it's another motivator to get kids moving in the fight against diabetes and obesity,” Shane Thompson said. He started the clinics as part of his senior year internship through the University of Minnesota's Recreation, Park and Leisure Studies program.</p><p align="left">Indigenous Lax is funded by the Circle of Generations program at the Minneapolis American Indian Center and is supported and staffed by Homegrown Lacrosse. The program is still looking to partner with organizations in the Native community to reach out to youth across the Twin Cities.</p><p align="left"><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/March/lacrosse_clinics_teach_culture_and_engage_community.jpg" height="432" width="630" /></p><p align="left">“This is a community collaboration,” Shane Thompson said. “Any organization that wants to be involved can be.”</p><p align="left">The clinics will be held every Saturday through March 15 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Minneapolis American Indian Center. Indigenous Lax is open to youth from third to eighth grades, is free of charge and includes lunch and transportation. To register, parents can visit www.homegrownlacrosse.org/indigenouslax or contact Shane Thompson directly at <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">shane</span> [at] <span class="d">homegrownlacrosse [dot] org</span></span> or 612-708-0699.</p><p align="left">He hopes these introductory clinics will engage and inspire enough Native youth to field teams for local Parks and Recreation Board leagues, which run from April 12 to May 17. “We want to kids to take away the fact that their people were the originators of the game and that there's a deep history involved,” he said. “We're trying to get them to realize the importance of the game, how it was a gift from the Creator to be played for his enjoyment."</p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Indigenous Lax kicked off its first lacrosse clinic on Feb. 15 with special guest speaker and Edmonton Rush player Jeremy Thompson (Onondaga). He also plays for the Iroquois Nationals, is a Nike N7 Ambassador and the co-star of a documentary titled, “The Medicine Game.” He shared his knowledge and experiences with 30 Native youth representing the Arapaho, Blackfoot, Dakota, Ho-Chunk, Lakota, Ojibwe, Omaha, Potawatomi and Yakama nations.<!--break--></p><p align="left">The goal of these introductory clinics is two-fold: introduce Native youth to the history and significance the game has to many tribal communities; and to teach them the foundational skills they need to compete in lacrosse leagues in the Twin Cities.</p><p align="left">“Both Native and non-Native [people] locally seem to think the sport is for and began with White Americans from elite communities and schools,” Clinic Director Shane Thompson (Odawa/Seneca) said. “This is far from the truth.”</p><p align="left">Lacrosse is one of the oldest sports in North America. According to oral history passed on to Jeremy Thompson, “lacrosse has been played for thousands of years and the first game was played by the animals.” He went on to elaborate that the game between the animals relates to today by acknowledging that every player has a role regardless of speed, strength or size.</p><p align="left">“It's a collective learning journey because I myself don't know the whole history of it locally, but somebody does and we're trying to get those people to talk to our kids about it and offer a different perspective,” Shane Thompson said.</p><p align="left">To help educate youth about the history of lacrosse, Shane Thompson plans to bring in a different guest speaker each week. In addition to Jeremy Thompson, Dan Ninham (Oneida) from Minnesota Ojibwe Lacrosse offered his perspectives about the traditional game to the group at the Feb. 23 clinic. Future presenters include Cherokee author and lacrosse enthusiast Art Coulson and Ojibwe artist Robert DesJarlait.</p><p align="left">In addition to introducing youth to the historical and cultural significance of the sport, Indigenous Lax aims to increase wellness in the community by promoting fitness.</p><p align="left">“We're hoping that it's another motivator to get kids moving in the fight against diabetes and obesity,” Shane Thompson said. He started the clinics as part of his senior year internship through the University of Minnesota's Recreation, Park and Leisure Studies program.</p><p align="left">Indigenous Lax is funded by the Circle of Generations program at the Minneapolis American Indian Center and is supported and staffed by Homegrown Lacrosse. The program is still looking to partner with organizations in the Native community to reach out to youth across the Twin Cities.</p><p align="left"><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/March/lacrosse_clinics_teach_culture_and_engage_community.jpg" height="432" width="630" /></p><p align="left">“This is a community collaboration,” Shane Thompson said. “Any organization that wants to be involved can be.”</p><p align="left">The clinics will be held every Saturday through March 15 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Minneapolis American Indian Center. Indigenous Lax is open to youth from third to eighth grades, is free of charge and includes lunch and transportation. To register, parents can visit www.homegrownlacrosse.org/indigenouslax or contact Shane Thompson directly at <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">shane</span> [at] <span class="d">homegrownlacrosse [dot] org</span></span> or 612-708-0699.</p><p align="left">He hopes these introductory clinics will engage and inspire enough Native youth to field teams for local Parks and Recreation Board leagues, which run from April 12 to May 17. “We want to kids to take away the fact that their people were the originators of the game and that there's a deep history involved,” he said. “We're trying to get them to realize the importance of the game, how it was a gift from the Creator to be played for his enjoyment."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Circle </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/87311"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/03/12/lacrosse-clinics-teach-indigenous-culture-and-engage-community#comments Race/Ethnicity Sports Youth Wed, 12 Mar 2014 19:14:57 +0000 87311 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Moving forward: Four steps and six strategies for promoting LGBTI rights around the world http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/advrights/moving-forward-four-steps-and-six-strategies-promoting-lgbti-rights-around-world <div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Bergquist </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/full/14/25/rainbow_flag_and_blue_skies.jpg" alt="" title="" width="360" height="240" class="imagecache imagecache-full imagecache-default imagecache-full_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>While viewers across the United States watched the Olympic closing ceremonies, Jason Collins became the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/24/sports/basketball/after-signing-with-nets-jason-collins-becomes-first-openly-gay-nba-player.html?_r=0" target="_blank">first publicly gay male athlete to compete</a> in a major North American professional sports league as he took to the basketball court in Los Angeles.<!--break--></p><p>NBC’s coverage of the Olympic Games over the past two weeks dedicated <a href="http://www.hrc.org/blog/entry/during-2014-olympic-games-nbc-devoted-nearly-2-hours-of-air-time-to-lgbt-si" target="_blank">less than two hours</a> to LGBTI issues. It’s a critical moment in the fight for LGBTI rights in Russia.</p><p>But first–just for a moment–let’s talk hardware. Openly bisexual Dutch speedskater Ireen Wüst was <a href="http://www.outsports.com/2014/2/23/5438640/ireen-wust-dutch-bisexual-speedskater-medals" target="_blank">the most decorated competitor at the Sochi Games</a>, with two gold and three silver medals. She’s only the <a href="http://www.nbcolympics.com/news/14-best-athletes-2014-sochi-olympics" target="_blank">eighth athlete ever to win five medals</a> at a Winter Olympics, and with plans to compete in 2018, she’s only two medals away from the career record for female competitors at the Winter Olympics. When Austrian ski jumper Daniela Iraschko-Stolz took silver, she <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/olympics/sochi/2014/02/12/daniela-iraschko-stolz-ski-jump-silver-gay-athlete/5413385/" target="_blank">commented</a>, “When you are in the media, many people maybe knew my name and also knew that I am married with a woman. And now the Olympic Games are here in Russia and . . . . I hope for the future that the people now can see the sport as a chance to change something.”</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/thefightgoeson.png" width="459" height="592" /></p><p>Athletes spend years training, practicing, and building strength and skills before they are ready for the Olympics. In a sense, human rights work is much the same. We have to take the long view on achieving success. LGBTI activists around the world may see the recent successes in the United States and think they happened overnight. But the first U.S. lawsuit for marriage equality was filed here in Minnesota in <strong><em><a href="http://www.freedomtomarry.org/pages/history-and-timeline-of-marriage" target="_blank">1970</a></em></strong>–it took 43 years for our state to recognize the right of same-sex couples to marry.</p><p>What can we do to help with Russia, and other countries that do not respect LGBTI rights? It can seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of strategies that human rights advocates can use to push for reform. And each strategy can be a piece of an overall solution. But human rights victories–like Olympic athletes–don’t happen overnight.</p><p>In the run-up to the Olympics, activists suggested a variety of strategies to promote LGBTI rights in Russia: showing solidarity with LGBTI Russians, holding perpetrators of anti-LGBTI violence accountable, challenging laws in court, engaging in advocacy at the United Nations, and pressing businesses to condemn the propaganda law and send a message of tolerance.</p><p>Which strategies are best? When The Advocates for Human Rights works on human rights issues, we use a set of steps to identify effective strategies. Let’s take a look at four of those steps, and see how six strategies measure up. (And even though this post is specific to LGBTI rights in Russia, this same analysis applies to LGBTI rights in other parts of the world, or to other human rights issues.)</p><p><strong>Step 1: Understand the context</strong></p><p>We need to look closely at the context in which the human rights violations occur. For example, much of the anti-gay sentiment in Russia is fueled by nationalism. So direct diplomatic advocacy from other countries may backfire. For example, journalist and free expression advocate <a href="http://yorkpen.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/sochi-winter-games-make-yourself-heard/" target="_blank">Cathal Sheerin</a> “interviewed a number of Russian journalists, filmmakers, writers and activists,” some of whom “suggested that protests made by cultural groups, students, artists and NGOs have much more influence than demands made by governments. This is partly because Putin switches into defensive ‘Cold War Mode’ when foreign governments criticise him. Pleas made by non-governmental groups, however, are much harder to dismiss as self-interested, political machinations. And for that reason, they have more chance of influencing the hearts and minds of Russian citizens.”</p><p>But even direct collaboration with international organizations may backfire. In October, Russian authorities <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/russian-government-spies-on-lgbt-activists-to-portray-them-a" target="_blank">bugged</a> a private strategy meeting between Russian LGBTI activists and several international human rights organizations. The state-run television channel broadcast audio from the meeting, presenting it as an expose of western “homosexualists who attempt to infiltrate our country.”</p><p>In addition, LGBTI people in Russia are vulnerable, facing discrimination, bullying, threats, and physical attacks. The first principle of human rights work is “Do no harm.” We need to make sure that our actions don’t put LGBTI Russians in more <a href="http://bigstory.ap.org/article/foes-russias-anti-gay-law-ponder-new-tactics" target="_blank">danger</a>.</p><p>In Russia, there are additional legal considerations. Russia’s <a href="http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/russia0413_ForUpload_0.pdf" target="_blank">Foreign Agents</a> law requires groups that receive foreign funding and engage in “political activities” to register as “foreign agents.” Another law bans funding from the United States that supports “political” activity by non-governmental organizations, and bans NGOs that engage in work that is “directed against Russia’s interests.” The Russian Government also recently expanded its <a href="http://www.impunitywatch.com/legislation-expanding-treason-definition-in-russia-could-criminalize-foreign-funded-organizations/" target="_blank">definition of treason</a> to potentially criminalize participation in international human rights advocacy. So groups in Russia might not be able to collaborate directly with their counterparts in other countries. The Russian groups who were victims of bugging last year <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/russian-government-spies-on-lgbt-activists-to-portray-them-a">fear they may now be sanctioned</a> under the Foreign Agents law.</p><p><strong><strong></strong>Step 2: Work in partnership</strong></p><p>The Advocates for Human Rights works to promote human rights in the United States and around the world. When we do human rights work concerning other countries, we work in partnership with either local, <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/list_of_issues_submission_re_art_475_of_moroccan_penal_code_final_12_6_13_3.pdf" target="_blank">in-country groups</a> or with <a href="http://www.advrights.org/uploads/oromo_report_2009_color.pdf" target="_blank">diaspora groups</a> that want to influence human rights in their country of origin or ancestry. These partnerships are critical, because our partners understand the local context–they have a good sense of what types of strategies would be effective, and which ones might backfire. They also have a clearer understanding of the legal context in which they operate and the types of actions that may result in fines or other penalties for violating Russian law.</p><p><strong>Step 3: Identify goals and strategies</strong></p><p>It is important to set goals before deciding on a human rights strategy. An over-arching human rights goal might be that all LGBTI people in Russia are safe and live with dignity. We look at a variety of strategies to achieve this goal, such as:</p><ul><li>Showing sympathy and support for LGBTI Russians</li><li>Getting the “gay propaganda” law repealed</li><li>Stopping violence and persecution based on actual and perceived sexual orientation and gender identity</li><li>Holding perpetrators of violence and persecution accountable</li></ul><p>Our <a href="http://discoverhumanrights.org/uploads/dhr_training_manual_2011.pdf" target="_blank">Discover Human Rights</a> training addresses in greater detail how to identify goals and the steps to achieve them.</p><p><em></em><strong>Step 4: Use tactical mapping</strong></p><p>In looking at these goals and strategies, we need to figure out who we need to influence, such as:</p><ul><li>Concerned individuals and groups around the world</li><li>Russian lawmakers</li><li>Russian civil society</li><li><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/tactical-map.jpg" width="230" height="173" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Russian courts</li><li>Russian law enforcement officials and prosecutors</li><li>Companies that do business in Russia</li></ul><p><em>Right: A tactical mapping exercise (Photo credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/forgery/370276863/" target="_blank">aniquenyc</a>, flickr)</em></p><p><strong>How do proposed strategies measure up?</strong></p><p><em></em>When Russia passed its propaganda law last summer, some of the first responses were calls for boycotts. <a href="http://www.lgbtnet.ru/en/content/winter-olympics-we-should-speak-not-walk-out" target="_blank">LGBTI activists in Russia</a> responded with <a href="http://www.cafebabel.co.uk/society/article/deti-404-interview-whats-life-like-for-russias-lgbt-youth.html" target="_blank">requests not to boycott</a> the Olympic Games. In the context of the Olympics, boycotts can do more harm than good, because they <a href="http://sportsethicist.com/2014/02/05/boycotts-and-the-sochi-olympics/" target="_blank">cause the most harm to athletes</a>–people who are not in a position to change a country’s laws. An effort to boycott Russian vodka had some limited success. It helped raise awareness about the propaganda law, and prompted one vodka maker to<a href="http://bigstory.ap.org/article/foes-russias-anti-gay-law-ponder-new-tactics" target="_blank"> speak out against the law</a> and <a href="http://www.advocate.com/business/2014/02/09/stoli-donates-150k-fight-russian-homophobia" target="_blank">donate to the cause</a>.</p><p><em><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/9641042662_41a3d061b9_z.jpg" width="620" height="413" /></em></p><p><em>August 2013 protest in Berlin calling for boycott of the Sochi Olympics (Photo Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/agroffman/9641042656/in/photostream/" target="_blank">Adam Groffman</a>, flickr)</em></p><p>Although boycotts can sometimes be <a href="http://africanactivist.msu.edu/organization.php?name=Anti-Apartheid+Movement" target="_blank">powerful tools to promote human rights</a>, but it’s important to think broadly and listen to the in-country advocates to evaluate which strategies will be most effective. Last month, The Advocates published <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/paving_pathways_for_justice_accountability_human_rights_tools_for_diaspora_communities_2.html" target="_blank">Paving Pathways for Justice and Accountability: Human Rights Tools for Diaspora Communities</a>. It’s a 400+ page toolkit of resources for human rights advocacy. We developed these resources in response to requests from diaspora groups, but they are equally valuable for other individuals and groups who want to be more effective advocates for human rights. Paving Pathways explores many strategies that have been proposed for promoting LGBTI rights in Russia:</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/children-404_logo.png" width="180" height="180" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" /><em>(Image at right courtesy <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Children-404_logo.png" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>)</em></p><p><strong>1. Showing solidarity with LGBTI Russians:</strong> When asked what people around the world can do to support LGBTI people in Russia, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/children.404?ref=br_tf" target="_blank">Дети-404</a> founder Elena Klimova <a href="http://www.cafebabel.co.uk/society/article/deti-404-interview-whats-life-like-for-russias-lgbt-youth.html" target="_blank">suggested</a>, “we are always very pleased when we receive letters and photos from abroad . . . . Then we understand that we are not alone, and that gives us strength and hope for a better future.” You can reach the Deti-404 team at <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">404deti</span> [at] <span class="d">gmail [dot] com</span></span>. You can like <a href="https://www.facebook.com/children.404?ref=br_tf" target="_blank">Дети-404</a> on Facebook, or set up a VK.com account and join the <a href="http://vk.com/deti404_vk" target="_blank">Дети-404 community</a> there. If you don’t speak Russian, you can read some translated Deti-404 submissions <a href="http://www.children404.co.uk/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p><em><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/principle-6.jpg" width="197" height="123" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />(Image at left courtesy <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:P6_image_with_text.jpg" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons)</a></em></p><p>Openly gay Olympian Australian snowboarder <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/belle-brockhoff/i-am-infuriated-by-the-homophobia-of-putins-government_b_4808709.html" target="_blank">Belle Brockhoff</a> has <a href="http://www.rferl.org/content/sochi-olympics-lgbt-protests-athletes/25254000.html" target="_blank">denounced Russia’s propaganda law</a>, and openly gay Dutch snowboarder Cheryl Maas <a href="http://olympics.cbc.ca/news/article/gay-snowboarder-cheryl-maas-rocks-rainbow-glove-sochi.html" target="_blank">displayed a rainbow and unicorn glove</a> to the cameras after one of her runs in Sochi. Several athletes are part of the <a href="http://www.principle6.org/" target="_blank">Principle 6 Movement</a>, using the <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/14/out-in-the-cold-lgbt-visibility-at-olympics-key-to-ending-homophobia/" target="_blank">non-discrimination language of the Olympic Charter</a> to <a href="http://www.theday.com/article/20140209/NWS14/302099902/1018" target="_blank">show solidarity with LGBTI Russians</a> without violating the Olympic ban on political speech.</p><p>Brian Boitano, one of the openly gay Olympians who was part of the U.S. delegation to Sochi, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brian-boitano/my-us-olympic-delegation-story_b_4774805.html?utm_hp_ref=tw" target="_blank">reported</a> that during a press conference, “[m]ost of the questions that were posed to me were about Obama’s message” in including him in the delegation. “Everywhere we went, people knew our message, and they were congratulating us,” he continued. “It was amazing: everyone in Russia knew exactly why we were there.”</p><p><a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/app_c_2.pdf" target="_blank">Social media can be a great advocacy tool</a>. On Twitter, you can follow Russian LGBTI groups and individuals like <a href="https://twitter.com/rusalgbt" target="_blank">RUSA LGBT</a>, the <a href="https://twitter.com/rulgbtnet" target="_blank">Russian LGBT Network</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/gay_russia" target="_blank">Gay Russia</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/RadarusOrg" target="_blank">Rainbow Association</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/hetero_for_lgbt" target="_blank">Straights for LGBT Equality</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/mirrorsbreath" target="_blank">Elena Kostyuchenko</a>, and <a href="https://twitter.com/n_alexeyev" target="_blank">Nikolai Alexeyev</a>. And you can monitor developments on <a href="http://queerussia.info/" target="_blank">Queerussia</a> and <a href="http://www.gayrussia.eu/en/" target="_blank">Gay Russia</a> and check out <a href="http://www.motherjones.com/media/2014/02/russia-love-gay-propaganda-photos-wedding" target="_blank">Mads Nissen’s striking photo essay</a> of LGBTI activists in Russia.</p><p><a href="https://twitter.com/ru_lgbt_teen" target="_blank">Kirill Maryin</a> is a 17-year-old from Novosibirsk who tweets about his personal experiences as well as the Russian propaganda law and how it is being enforced:</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/gayteenfromrussia.png" width="511" height="220" /></p><p>“I wanted people who live abroad to hear the true story of life for LGBT teenagers from Russia,” Maryin <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/feb/11/russia-violent-anti-gay-groups-vkontakte-lgbt-sochi" target="_blank">told the Guardian</a>. “I am an ordinary LGBT teenager, and in this country, that is incredibly dangerous.” You can <a href="https://twitter.com/ru_lgbt_teen" target="_blank">follow Maryin on Twitter</a> and send him a message of support.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.itgetsbetter.org/" target="_blank">It Gets Better Project</a> has a <a href="http://www.itgetsbetter.org/content/russia" target="_blank">campaign to show support for LGBTI youth in Russia</a>; people can submit their own videos and add their names to a message of support.</p><p>It’s important to understand how critical our expressions of solidarity and support can be. Over the last two weeks, <a href="http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/eight-suicide-attempts-uganda-last-two-weeks-over-anti-gay-law240214" target="_blank">eight LGBTI Ugandans have attempted suicide</a> over that country’s harsh new law. Russia has the <a href="http://www.sptimes.ru/story/37073" target="_blank">highest teen suicide rate in Europe</a>.</p><p>“I don’t like being an activist,” journalist <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/21/the-wild-east-vigilante-violence-against-lgbti-russians/" target="_blank">Elena Kostyuchenko</a> <a href="http://www.gq.com/news-politics/big-issues/201402/being-gay-in-russia" target="_blank">told a reporter</a>. But “[i]t’s a long time until there will be some kind of magical Russian Harvey Milk who will defend my rights. I have been waiting, but he is not coming.” If you know a human rights defender or LGBTI person in Russia like Kostyuchenko who may be at risk, show them support on social media and give them a link to our <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/app_q.pdf" target="_blank">Resources for Human Rights Defenders</a>.</p><p><strong>2. Shutting down vigilante groups: </strong>My <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/21/the-wild-east-vigilante-violence-against-lgbti-russians/" target="_blank">fourth post</a> in this series described how vigilante groups use social media to hunt down LGBTI youth and publicize their attacks. Sometimes their activities violate the terms of service of these social media providers. After inquiries from the Guardian ealier this month, В Kонтакте (VK.com) pledged to remove violent content and delete the accounts of offenders, but five days later <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/feb/11/russia-violent-anti-gay-groups-vkontakte-lgbt-sochi" target="_blank">only one video had been removed</a>. If you use Instagram, Youtube, Facebook, or VK, report these violations and help get the groups shut down. Instagram recently <a href="http://americablog.com/2014/02/russian-police-chief-sergei-umnov-letting-hitler-loving-anti-gay-kidnappers-go-free.html" target="_blank">pulled the accounts</a> of two Occupy Pedophilia leaders. <a href="http://americablog.com/2014/02/russian-police-chief-sergei-umnov-letting-hitler-loving-anti-gay-kidnappers-go-free.html" target="_blank">One activist</a> is asking for help to use social media to track down the identity of people involved in anti-gay violence in order to prompt Russian authorities to bring charges.</p><p><strong>3. Accountability: </strong>Russian authorities have been slow to take on the vigilante groups that are largely responsible for violence against LGBTI Russians. But last week, a Russian court <a href="http://queerussia.info/2014/02/19/4438/?utm_source=twitterfeed&amp;utm_medium=twitter" target="_blank">sentenced three Russian men</a> for killing and robbing several gay men in Moscow in 2012. And authorities have <a href="http://queerussia.info/2014/02/22/4475/" target="_blank">brought charges</a> against at least two participants in the Occupy Pedophilia vigilante group. Advocates can work with their Russian counterparts to determine the most effective ways to encourage further prosecutions for these crimes.</p><p>There are also opportunities to hold the U.S.-based architects of Russia’s anti-LGBTI laws accountable. As I noted last week, Scott Lively is being <a href="http://ccrjustice.org/LGBTUganda/" target="_blank">sued</a> under the U.S. Alien Tort Statute for his work on anti-gay legislation in Uganda. The <a href="http://ccrjustice.org/" target="_blank">Center for Constitutional Rights</a> is considering bringing a similar <a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/rainbow-belongs-god-anti-gay-us-pastor-sets-sights-sochi-v20546485" target="_blank">suit against Lively</a> for his work in Russia.</p><p><strong><strong></strong>4. Litigation:</strong> <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/ch_8_2.pdf" target="_blank">Domestic courts</a> and <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/ch_10_2.pdf" target="_blank">regional human rights mechanisms</a> can be effective avenues for advocacy. Russian LGBTI activists Nikolai Alexeyev and Yaroslav Yevtushenko are <a href="http://queerussia.info/2013/12/04/2840/" target="_blank">setting up a legal challenge to the propaganda law</a>. They have been fined 4,000 rubles each for picketing a children’s library in Arkhangelsk while holding up banners saying, “Gay propaganda doesn’t exist. People don’t become gay, people are born gay.” “The verdicts open the way for appealing the ban on gay propaganda at Russia’s Constitutional court and later at the European Court of Human Rights,” Alexeyev told GayRussia. Russia’s courts have shown some signs of independence, <a href="http://lgbtnet.ru/en/content/elena-klimova-was-acquitted" target="_blank">throwing out</a> charges against <a href="https://www.facebook.com/children.404?ref=br_tf" target="_blank">Deti-404</a>‘s Klimova and <a href="http://www.hrw.org/node/115544" target="_blank">rejecting some prosecutions for violations of the Foreign Agents law</a>. But the Constitutional Court has <a href="http://europeancourts.blogspot.com/2013/04/russias-anti-gay-propaganda-law-and.html" target="_blank">upheld convictions</a> of regional anti-propaganda laws, and the Russian Supreme Court has rejected similar appeals.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/ch10-european-court.png" width="300" height="113" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Even though the prospects for success in Russia’s courts aren’t promising, activists first need to exhaust their remedies in their own domestic legal system before taking their case to the European Court of Human Rights. Paul Johnson at the University of York has done a <a href="http://europeancourts.blogspot.com/2013/04/russias-anti-gay-propaganda-law-and.html" target="_blank">thorough analysis</a> of the <a href="http://echrso.blogspot.nl/2013/04/new-working-paper-on-homosexual.html" target="_blank">prospects</a> for a challenge to the propaganda law in the European Court of Human rights. The European Court is already <a href="http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/sites/eng/pages/search.aspx?i=001-128180#%7B%22itemid%22:[%22001-128180%22]%7D" target="_blank">considering a case</a> challenging a local propaganda law, and the court has expressed interest in adding consideration of the newer federal law to that case.</p><p><strong><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/un-flags_highres-2.jpg" width="268" height="201" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />5. Advocacy at the United Nations: </strong>Most of the UN human rights treaty bodies have “communications mechanisms” that individuals can use to bring a complaint alleging that their government has violated the treaty text. In 2010, Irina Fedotovna submitted a <a href="http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/docs/CCPR.C.106.D.1932.2010.doc" target="_blank">communication</a> to the UN Human Rights Committee to challenge a local law banning “gay propaganda” in Ryazan, Russia. She had been charged under that law after displaying signs saying “Homosexuality is normal” and “I am proud of my homosexuality” near a secondary school. In 2012, the Human Rights Committee concluded that her conviction amounted to a violation of her rights under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and found that Fedotovna was entitled to compensation. Yet despite this ruling, in 2013 Russia adopted its federal propaganda law.</p><p>UN advocacy may pose risks to Russian organizations; Russian authorities have cited advocacy with the UN Committee Against Torture as evidence that the St. Petersburg anti-discrimination group Memorial is a “<a href="http://www.hrw.org/node/115544" target="_blank">foreign agent</a>.” Moreover, Russia routinely ignores the resolutions and findings of UN human rights bodies, so it’s important to weigh the potential positive effects of successful UN advocacy with potential risks and costs at the national level.</p><p><strong>6. Corporate influence: </strong>Some Olympic sponsors have faced sharp criticism in social media for not <a href="http://bigstory.ap.org/article/foes-russias-anti-gay-law-ponder-new-tactics" target="_blank">condemning Russia’s propaganda law</a>. Activists have generated visibility for those issues by spinning <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-wooledge/now-playing-2014-sochi-olympics_b_4766560.html" target="_blank">social media promotions</a> by Olympic sponsors <a href="http://www.rferl.org/content/sochi-olympics-lgbt-protests-athletes/25254000.html" target="_blank">Coca-Cola and McDonald’s</a> to raise visibility about human rights. Activists transformed McDonald’s #CheersToSochi campaign into a <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-wooledge/mcdonalds-gay-propaganda-sochi_b_4804565.html" target="_blank">social media tool</a> to <a href="http://cheerstosochi.org/" target="_blank">raise awareness about the propaganda law</a>. And these campaigns had impressive spillover effects, prompting other major companies like <a href="http://blogs.att.net/consumerblog/story/a7793998#__utma=149406063.1579812923.1391814975.1391814975.1391814975.1&amp;__utmb=149406063.1.10.1391814975&amp;__utmc=149406063&amp;__utmx=-&amp;__utmz=149406063.1391814975.1.1.utmcsr=google%7Cutmccn=%28organic%29%7Cutmcmd=organic%7Cutmctr=%28not%20provided%29&amp;__utmv=-&amp;__utmk=2673697" target="_blank">AT&amp;T</a> and <a href="http://www.newnownext.com/chobani-yogurt-team-usa-sponsor-banned-at-sochi-posts-pro-lgbt-ad/02/2014/" target="_blank">Chobani</a> to <a href="http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/07/as-olympics-open-social-media-is-a-prism-for-protests-against-russias-ant-gay-law/?_php=true&amp;_type=blogs&amp;smid=tw-share&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">show their support</a> for LGBTI rights. Chevrolet and Coca-Cola also committed to broadcast <a href="http://www.lgbtqnation.com/2014/02/chevrolet-plans-olympics-ads-featuring-diverse-cast-that-includes-gay-families/" target="_blank">television advertisements</a> during the Olympics with diverse casts, including gay families. Advertising can help shape public opinion in other countries, too. <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/ch_7_2.pdf" target="_blank">Advocacy targeting businesses</a> is also a particularly important tool when <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/app_g.pdf" target="_blank">business practices themselves are directly responsible</a> for human rights violations.</p><p><strong>The games are over, the fight goes on</strong></p><p>Russia will host the <a href="http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/russia2018/" target="_blank">FIFA World Cup in 2018</a>. Over the next four years, we have a lot of work to do to ensure that the next major international sporting event in Russia takes place in a climate of safety and dignity for competitors, fans, and for all LGBTI Russians.</p><p>What will you do to promote LGBTI rights? Which strategies do you think would be most effective? How would you tailor strategies to combat LGBTI persecution in other parts of the world, like <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2013/09/23/look-at-the-details-of-eric-ohena-lembembes-life-and-you-will-understand-why-he-died/" target="_blank">Cameroon</a>, <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/indias-gay-community-scrambling-after-court-decision-recriminalises-homosexuality-9146244.html" target="_blank">India</a>, <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com/lesterfeder/how-jamaicas-sodomy-laws-drive-gay-teens-into-the-sewers-of" target="_blank">Jamaica</a>, <a href="http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=6&amp;cad=rja&amp;ved=0CEgQFjAF&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fopinions%2Fnigerias-anti-gay-law-demands-a-response-from-the-west%2F2014%2F02%2F10%2F23b19570-9276-11e3-b227-12a45d109e03_story.html&amp;ei=s68KU7u6Kena4ATT04HYAw&amp;usg=AFQjCNFwySr1T1cNHIQiPC0cHMfWjKbxJg&amp;sig2=8aYcPcyzzhaeZVLnUMTvbw&amp;bvm=bv.61725948,d.bGE" target="_blank">Nigeria</a>, and <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/udoka-okafor/gay-rights-in-uganda-how-_b_4805867.html" target="_blank">Uganda</a>? Are there in-country or diaspora partners you can work with? Will you spread the word and help build a movement to promote LGBTI rights around the world?</p><p><em>This post is the last in a five-part series in The Advocates Post about LGBTI rights in Russia and the Sochi Olympics. <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/14/out-in-the-cold-lgbt-visibility-at-olympics-key-to-ending-homophobia/" target="_blank">Part 1</a> took a look at why the Sochi Olympics in 2014 are important to LGBTI rights in Russia and the rest of the world. <em> <a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/18/russias-gay-propaganda-law-how-u-s-extremists-are-fueling-the-fight-against-lgbti-rights/" target="_blank">Part 2</a> examined <em>the provisions of Russia’s propaganda law, its effect on children, and its origins.</em> </em> </em><em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/20/locking-the-iron-closet-russias-propaganda-law-isolates-vulnerable-lgbti-youth/" target="_blank">Part 3</a> explored how Russian authorities are enforcing the propaganda law. <em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/21/the-wild-east-vigilante-violence-against-lgbti-russians/" target="_blank">Part 4</a> examined the societal effects of discriminatory laws such as those in Russia and other countries.</em></em></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><em>More posts in this series:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/14/out-in-the-cold-lgbt-visibility-at-olympics-key-to-ending-homophobia/" target="_blank">Out in the Cold: LGBT Visibility at Olympics Key to Ending Homophobia</a></em></li><li><em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/18/russias-gay-propaganda-law-how-u-s-extremists-are-fueling-the-fight-against-lgbti-rights/" target="_blank">Russia’s “Gay Propaganda” Law: How U.S. Extremists are Fueling the Fight Against LGBTI Rights</a></em></li><li><em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/20/locking-the-iron-closet-russias-propaganda-law-isolates-vulnerable-lgbti-youth/" target="_blank">Locking the Iron Closet: Russia’s Propaganda Law Isolates Vulnerable LGBTI Youth</a></em></li><li><em><a href="http://theadvocatespost.org/2014/02/21/the-wild-east-vigilante-violence-against-lgbti-russians/" target="_blank">The Wild East: Vigilante Violence against LGBTI Russians</a></em></li></ul><p><em><a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/amy_bergquist.html" target="_blank">Amy Bergquist</a> is staff attorney with the <a href="http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/International_Justice.html" target="_blank">International Justice Program</a> at The Advocates for Human Rights.</em></p><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/advocates-human-rights">The Advocates for Human Rights</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/partners/advocates-human-rights">The Advocates for Human Rights</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/86635"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/advrights/moving-forward-four-steps-and-six-strategies-promoting-lgbti-rights-around-world#comments Russia Gender/GLBT Sports World Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:21:07 +0000 Amy Bergquist 86635 at http://tcdailyplanet.net Minneapolis should get out of the golf game http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/anonymous/minneapolis-should-get-out-golf-game <div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Scott Shaffer </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/full/14/23/bewaregolf-500x375.jpg" alt="" title="" width="360" height="270" class="imagecache imagecache-full imagecache-default imagecache-full_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>Golf is a game. It’s entertainment. “It’s a good walk spoiled,” Mark Twain said, apocryphally. Could government provide a service that’s less essential? It’s hard to imagine.<!--break--></p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.streets.mn">Streets.MN</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Streets.MN stories:</em></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://streets.mn/2014/02/19/all-about-community-in-emmaville-a-nostalgic-place-in-minnesotas-northwoods">All About Emmaville, in Minnesota’s Northwoods</a></em></li><li><em><a href="http://streets.mn/2014/02/21/where-to-paint-your-street/">Where to Paint Your Street</a></em></li></ul></blockquote><p>Nevertheless, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) runs <a href="http://minneapolisparks.org/default.asp?PageID=73">six golf courses</a>. Once upon a time, these courses made money, but those days are gone. The MPRB <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/morning_roundup/2014/02/minneapolis-golf-course-fixes-34m.html">recently</a> got <a href="http://minneapolisparksmn.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_Meeting.aspx?ID=1321">a report from a Golf Convergence</a>, a consulting firm, that contained some stark truths. Since 2000, the number of rounds played at public courses has plummeted 46%, and the courses need $14 million dollars of renovation just to maintain the status quo. To turn things around, the report said the Park Board would have to spend $34.5 million on the courses.</p><p>Minneapolis should try to get out of the golf business.</p><p>It’s not that I think that everything should be left to the free market. I love parks and libraries! Sometimes <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_utility">public ownership make sense</a>. But for a lot of things, private ownership is the best system, and people should pay for what they use. An activity should be subsidized (or taxed) in proportion to how it benefits (or harms) <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externality">bystanders</a>.</p><p>And what are the external effects of golf courses? The vast, manicured lawns are nice to look at, but the herbicides, fungicides, pesticides, and fertilizers <a href="http://www.golfdigest.com/magazine/2008-05/environment_feldman">wreak havoc</a> on other vulnerable organisms (sometimes humans). They use a <a href="http://www.waterinfo.org/resources/water-facts">stupefying amount of water</a>. The <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91363837">2.5 billion gallons of water</a> used each day to irrigate the world’s golf courses is more than enough to support every person in Asia. The external benefits of the beautiful courses are mostly captured by the folks who own nice homes nearby. Municipal golf courses are good for golfers and nearby property owners, and bad for pretty much everyone else. This is all to say that it doesn’t look like golf courses’ net effect on society justifies a subsidy.</p><p>It’s not about being pro-golf or anti-golf. This is how the <a href="http://minneapolisparksmn.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_Meeting.aspx?ID=1321">consultants at Golf Convergence</a> framed the issue:</p><p>“To what extent should a governmental entity subsidize the leisure of a recreational asset that is utilized by less than 15% of the population whose average age is 41.5 years of age, who have median household income of $85,800, and 80% of which are Caucasian?”</p><p>What a nice, pointy question! But the economist in me wants to pare down the question to something like this: “When should we use city-owned land for golf and not something else?” A thrifty response would be, “If and only if using the land as a golf course is more valuable than any alternative.”</p><p>It’s important to consider all possibilities. If you just look at the revenue and expenses of a golf course, then you’ll only see part of the picture. When we choose to devote land to playing golf, we’re giving up the profit that would come from the best alternative. That’s what economists call the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opportunity_cost">opportunity cost</a> of a venture. Even if the city golf courses were financially sustainable, we might be leaving money on the table if there were a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highest_and_best_use">better use</a> for them.</p><p><em><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/February/golf_caddy-350x500.jpg" width="250" height="357" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Right: 18th Century beknickered golfer with caddy in a tricorne hat.</em></p><p>So in order to understand the real cost of maintaining expansive, expensive, pseudo-public parks, we have to consider what else we could be doing with the property. How about building homes, offices, shops, restaurants, bars, churches, small parks, and schools? If you hadn’t heard, Mayor Hodges wants Minneapolis’s population to grow to 500,000. “Where are all these people going to go?” the <a href="http://www.southwestjournal.com/voices/voices/a-half-million-minneapolitans-heaven-or-hubris">skeptics have asked</a>. “Have you noticed these big chunks of empty city-owned land?” I reply.</p><p>Some courses could even be sites for transit-oriented development. Of Minneapolis’s six public golf courses, <a href="https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zyFQZhGB1jyc.kS8VfDVTkKyg">three are within a half-mile of planned or existing train stations</a>. Meadowbrook is pretty close to the proposed Louisiana station of the Southwest LRT, the Blue Line extension has a planned stop at the Theodore Wirth course, and the Fort Snelling Course is right next to a Blue Line station.</p><p>How feasible is this? I’m not sure, to be honest. I have no experience in the financial or legal aspects of selling public land. But for Minneapolis to grow, we need to choose which of the barriers to growth we push against. Do we <a href="http://streets.mn/2012/01/14/urban-highway-removal-in-minneapolis/">remove some freeways</a> and rebuild a few city blocks? Do we relax zoning codes to allow <a href="http://streets.mn/2014/02/13/would-the-minneapolis-of-today-oppose-the-construction-of-the-ids-center-can-we-still-dream-as-we-once-did/">taller towers</a>? Do we <a href="http://streets.mn/2012/12/10/tax-land-not-buildings/">change our tax structure</a> to discourage surface parking lots? All these ideas have merit, but it sounds like it would be easier just to sell a golf course or two.</p><p>Minneapolis has a history of <a href="http://streets.mn/2013/05/14/minnesota-vikings-stadium-needs-better-urban-design/">subsidizing</a> <a href="http://streets.mn/2013/12/27/2013-best-sports-venue-target-field/">sports</a> until it hurts. I get that. But if Minneapolis’s interest in providing an “entry door” to an unpopular sport trumps its resolve to become a more vibrant city, I might as well quit this whole urbanism thing and join the winning side. Maybe the <a href="http://www.minnesotabadminton.com/">Twin Cities Badminton Club</a> needs a lobbyist.</p><p><em>(Photo by flickr user <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9539613@N03/7875624276/sizes/l/">Ro’tten</a> under creative commons license.)</em></p><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/streetsmn">Streets.MN</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://tcdailyplanet.net/node/86556"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"><li>Despite being an occasional golfer myself, I agree that it would be entirely appropriate to reconsider the amount of land and financial subsidy currently devoted to golf in the Twin Cities. That said, I would hope that any repurposed golf courses would be preserved as green parkland. There are plenty of places (ahem, "historic" drive-through Dinkytown banks) where housing and commercial development can occur without eating parkland. - by Jay Gabler on Mon, 02/24/2014 - 7:40pm</li></ul> http://tcdailyplanet.net/blog/anonymous/minneapolis-should-get-out-golf-game#comments parks Sports Sun, 23 Feb 2014 18:23:45 +0000 Scott Shaffer 86556 at http://tcdailyplanet.net