Sports http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/taxonomy/term/12/feed en Native community welcomes new lacrosse star http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/01/16/native-community-welcomes-new-lacrosse-star <div class="field field-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="emvideo emvideo-preview emvideo-youtube"><iframe id="media-youtube-html5-1" title="YouTube video player" class="media-youtube-html5" type="text/html" width="360" height="300" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mmOUU9BJh-c?autoplay=0&rel=0&hd=1" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Circle </div> </div> </div> <p><span><span><strong>M</strong></span>iles Giaehgwaeh Thompson, co-winner of college lacrosse’s top honor last year with his younger brother Lyle, arrived in the Twin Cities on Jan. 2 to a hero’s welcome before he had even played in his first National Lacrosse League game.</span><span></span><span></span></p><p><span>Twin Cities Native American Lacrosse Club youth players, coaches and families joined other members of the local Native community to greet Thompson with banners and an honor song as he arrived at the Minneapolis airport. He was all smiles as he posed for photos and signed autographs for the fans in the airport’s baggage claim area.</span></p><p><span>The next night, Thompson scored three goals and one assist in his NLL debut at the Xcel Center before a crowd of almost 9,000 fans. Although the Swarm lost 20-13 to Colorado, the team’s native players – forwards Thompson (Onondaga from New York), veteran Corbyn Tao (Nishga First Nation from British Columbia) and returning Swarm star Dean Hill (Turtle Clan Mohawk from Six Nations) – accounted for more than half the scoring, with Tao and Hill adding two goals each.</span></p><p><span>When Hill fed Thompson the ball for one of his goals, a group of fans in the corner of the arena held up a large Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy) flag and danced.</span></p><p><span>It was just the sort of welcome and excitement for the Creator’s game that Thompson was expecting.</span></p><p><span>“When I was talking to different (National Lacrosse League general managers) and trying to decide where I wanted to play, my brother Lyle told me about Minnesota,” Thompson said by phone before he boarded his flight to Minnesota. “He said the Swarm draws a big crowd and they really love lacrosse. That's really how I decided I wanted to come to Minnesota.”</span></p><p><span>Miles was the Swarm’s top pick in the 2014 NLL draft. The team also drafted Joe Haodais Maracle, Bear Clan Cayuga, who plays this year on the Swarm’s practice squad. Tao, drafted by the Swarm in 2011, played on the practice squad most of last season but returned to a starting role in 2015. Hill, played for the Swarm from 2006-09 before he was traded to Washington, then Colorado. He was re-signed by the Swarm as a free-agent last summer.</span></p><p><span>On the sidelines for the Swarm, assistant coach Aime Caines (Mi'kmaq First Nations) is in his eighth season with the team. Caines has been very involved in spreading the game in native communities across Minnesota, including leading Lax4Life camps at Fond du Lac and Prairie Island.</span></p><p><span>Thompson, too, wants to help grow the game with native youth.</span></p><p><span>“My brothers and I have camps that we run, Thompson Brothers Lacrosse, and we want to grow the game as much as we can,” he said. “This is our game as native people, so we want to take the camps to all of the reservation communities in Minnesota and work with the youth.”</span></p><p><span>The Swarm play their next three games on the road, returning to The Hive Feb. 6 for Native American Heritage Night and a game with the defending NLL champion Rochester Knighthawks. The game will be sponsored by the team’s 2015 partner, Ho-Chunk Gaming Wisconsin.</span></p><p><span>When asked if he had a message for the native community in the Twin Cities, Thompson said, “I'm excited to come out to Minnesota and I'm looking forward to meeting all of you.”</span></p><p><span>He got a pretty good start New Year’s weekend.</span></p><p><span>For more information about Native American Heritage Night or to buy tickets, call (888) MN-SWARM or visit www.mnswarm.com.</span></p><p><span><em>Art Coulson is a veteran journalist and member of The Circle board. His book, The Creator’s Game: A Story of Baaga’adowe/Lacrosse, was published in 2013 by the Minnesota Historical Society Press. He plays lacrosse and traditional Cherokee stickball.</em></span></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span><span><strong>M</strong></span>iles Giaehgwaeh Thompson, co-winner of college lacrosse’s top honor last year with his younger brother Lyle, arrived in the Twin Cities on Jan. 2 to a hero’s welcome before he had even played in his first National Lacrosse League game.</span><span></span><span></span></p><p><span>Twin Cities Native American Lacrosse Club youth players, coaches and families joined other members of the local Native community to greet Thompson with banners and an honor song as he arrived at the Minneapolis airport. He was all smiles as he posed for photos and signed autographs for the fans in the airport’s baggage claim area.</span></p><p><span>The next night, Thompson scored three goals and one assist in his NLL debut at the Xcel Center before a crowd of almost 9,000 fans. Although the Swarm lost 20-13 to Colorado, the team’s native players – forwards Thompson (Onondaga from New York), veteran Corbyn Tao (Nishga First Nation from British Columbia) and returning Swarm star Dean Hill (Turtle Clan Mohawk from Six Nations) – accounted for more than half the scoring, with Tao and Hill adding two goals each.</span></p><p><span>When Hill fed Thompson the ball for one of his goals, a group of fans in the corner of the arena held up a large Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy) flag and danced.</span></p><p><span>It was just the sort of welcome and excitement for the Creator’s game that Thompson was expecting.</span></p><p><span>“When I was talking to different (National Lacrosse League general managers) and trying to decide where I wanted to play, my brother Lyle told me about Minnesota,” Thompson said by phone before he boarded his flight to Minnesota. “He said the Swarm draws a big crowd and they really love lacrosse. That's really how I decided I wanted to come to Minnesota.”</span></p><p><span>Miles was the Swarm’s top pick in the 2014 NLL draft. The team also drafted Joe Haodais Maracle, Bear Clan Cayuga, who plays this year on the Swarm’s practice squad. Tao, drafted by the Swarm in 2011, played on the practice squad most of last season but returned to a starting role in 2015. Hill, played for the Swarm from 2006-09 before he was traded to Washington, then Colorado. He was re-signed by the Swarm as a free-agent last summer.</span></p><p><span>On the sidelines for the Swarm, assistant coach Aime Caines (Mi'kmaq First Nations) is in his eighth season with the team. Caines has been very involved in spreading the game in native communities across Minnesota, including leading Lax4Life camps at Fond du Lac and Prairie Island.</span></p><p><span>Thompson, too, wants to help grow the game with native youth.</span></p><p><span>“My brothers and I have camps that we run, Thompson Brothers Lacrosse, and we want to grow the game as much as we can,” he said. “This is our game as native people, so we want to take the camps to all of the reservation communities in Minnesota and work with the youth.”</span></p><p><span>The Swarm play their next three games on the road, returning to The Hive Feb. 6 for Native American Heritage Night and a game with the defending NLL champion Rochester Knighthawks. The game will be sponsored by the team’s 2015 partner, Ho-Chunk Gaming Wisconsin.</span></p><p><span>When asked if he had a message for the native community in the Twin Cities, Thompson said, “I'm excited to come out to Minnesota and I'm looking forward to meeting all of you.”</span></p><p><span>He got a pretty good start New Year’s weekend.</span></p><p><span>For more information about Native American Heritage Night or to buy tickets, call (888) MN-SWARM or visit www.mnswarm.com.</span></p><p><span><em>Art Coulson is a veteran journalist and member of The Circle board. His book, The Creator’s Game: A Story of Baaga’adowe/Lacrosse, was published in 2013 by the Minnesota Historical Society Press. He plays lacrosse and traditional Cherokee stickball.</em></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/105390"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/01/16/native-community-welcomes-new-lacrosse-star#comments Communities Sports Fri, 16 Jan 2015 19:51:04 +0000 Art Coulson 105390 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Mascot protest spurs continued momentum http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/01/15/mascot-protest-spurs-continued-momentum <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/01/15/mascot-protest-spurs-continued-momentum" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/15/notyourmascot.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Circle </div> </div> </div> <p><span><span><strong>I</strong></span>n the weeks since thousands of native people and their allies converged on TCF Stadium to protest the Washington NFL team’s offensive name, those involved in the #NotYourMascot march and rally have continued the conversation with a focus on maintaining momentum toward a name change.</span></p><p><span>“Five hundred and twenty-two years of stereotypes is difficult to eradicate,” Robert DesJarlait, a Red Lake elder, said. He carried the eagle staff to lead the People’s March from the American Indian OIC to the stadium on the University of Minnesota campus on Nov. 2 as an organizer for Save Our Manoomin. “We need to use education as a means of dislodging decades of stereotypes. [Washington owner Daniel] Snyder's team is just the starting point. But it's the beginning of the process to eradicate such imagery and restore pride and human dignity to Native people.”</span></p><p><span>Organizers of the march said while the Washington team name is the most racially offensive, their battle to end the use of native mascots in sport does not end there.</span></p><p><span>“We need to go after not just the NFL, but the NHL and major-league baseball also,” Jason Elias, a march organizer and member of AIM-Twin Cities said. “I think it's too bad we missed an opportunity this last summer to protest the All-Star game when it was here in Minneapolis. One thing I would like to say is that I would like to give credit and thank Vernon Bellecourt who is the founding father in the fight against Native mascots. He truly deserves the credit.”</span></p><p><span>Elias plans to continue the battle by focusing on schools and using anti-bullying policies to target those who wear native mascot gear to school.</span></p><p><span>#NotYourMascot is a coalition of grassroots organizations including Idle No More-Twin Cities, AIM-Twin Cities, AIM Patrol of Minneapolis, United Urban Warrior Society, Idle No More-Wisconsin, Protect Our Manoomin, Twin Cities Save the Kids, Minnesota Two Spirit Society and several other organizations.</span></p><p><span>The march and rally for the Minnesota-Washington football game, which drew a crowd of between 3,500 and 5,000 people from across North America who marched on the stadium from several directions, was the largest so far to protest the use of native mascots by sports teams. Organizers vowed to protest at each of the remaining Washington football games this season. On Nov. 23, hundreds of protesters took to the streets in San Francisco before the San Francisco-Washington game.</span></p><p><span>Opposition to the Washington team name includes numerous tribal organizations and tribal leaders, the National Congress of American Indians, the U.S. Congress, President Barack Obama, civil rights and religious groups, players and former players. Representatives of most of these groups spoke at the Minneapolis rally.</span></p><p><span>“I think the thing that struck me the most while I was marching was the notion that this was, in essence, a civil rights march,” DesJarlait said. “We were marching against discrimination, in particular, discriminatory imagery that is not only evoked by Dan Snyder, but discriminatory imagery that is embedded in the history between Euro-Americans and Native Americans … One approach to maintain pressure on Dan Snyder is to establish a nationwide alliance – an alliance that is inclusive of all the various anti-mascot organizations and also include non-Native groups. If more emphasis is placed on civil rights, public support would broaden. At present, Snyder doesn't accept that his team's name is racist. But the dynamics of civil rights would force the issue of the racism that is inherent in the team's name.”</span></p><p><span>Yvonne Barrett, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe and her daughter, Mika, joined the march that began at Northrup Auditorium. She was struck by the number of fans entering the game who pushed back at the protest.</span></p><p><span>“At the TCF stadium, the group walked past several football fans – both for Minnesota and Washington. I overheard one Vikings fan say to a rally participant, ‘I don’t know what you guys are making a big deal about. They’ve had the mascot for years. It’s tradition.’ Obviously, he has a different frame of reference for what tradition means,” she said. “The rally made my daughter and I feel a lot of pride for being part of a community that doesn’t tolerate racist stereotypes in sports media and is speaking up.”</span></p><p><span>Jase Roe, who helped organize the rally and march for the Minnesota Two Spirit Society, said racist mascots are a symptom of a deeper issue. “I grew up being ashamed of who I was,” he told the crowd gathered at American Indian OIC before the two and a half-mile march. “For many of us today, it’s more than a mascot or a name. It’s about taking pride in who we are.”</span></p><p><span>After the rally, Barrett called on leaders who spoke that day to continue the fight.</span></p><p><span>Speakers at the rally included leaders of many native nations from Minnesota and elsewhere, members of Congress, former NFL players, the mayor of Minneapolis and representatives of national groups such as the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media.</span></p><p><span>“The march definitely brought the community together. I saw so many individuals, families and community organizations come together to have a united voice about the mascot issue,” Barrett said. “I hope that the enthusiasm and spirit of the day doesn’t end with the rally. We need to have the leaders that were present continue to push the issue forward.”</span></p><p><span><em>Art Coulson, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, is a veteran journalist and author who lives in the Twin Cities.</em></span><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">&nbsp;</span></p><p><span><em><strong>EDITOR'S NOTE:</strong>&nbsp;The National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media organized the rally that began at TCF Stadium. The #NotYourMascot march was organized by a coalition of grassroots organizations not formally affiliated with NCARSM.</em></span></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span><span><strong>I</strong></span>n the weeks since thousands of native people and their allies converged on TCF Stadium to protest the Washington NFL team’s offensive name, those involved in the #NotYourMascot march and rally have continued the conversation with a focus on maintaining momentum toward a name change.</span></p><p><span>“Five hundred and twenty-two years of stereotypes is difficult to eradicate,” Robert DesJarlait, a Red Lake elder, said. He carried the eagle staff to lead the People’s March from the American Indian OIC to the stadium on the University of Minnesota campus on Nov. 2 as an organizer for Save Our Manoomin. “We need to use education as a means of dislodging decades of stereotypes. [Washington owner Daniel] Snyder's team is just the starting point. But it's the beginning of the process to eradicate such imagery and restore pride and human dignity to Native people.”</span></p><p><span>Organizers of the march said while the Washington team name is the most racially offensive, their battle to end the use of native mascots in sport does not end there.</span></p><p><span>“We need to go after not just the NFL, but the NHL and major-league baseball also,” Jason Elias, a march organizer and member of AIM-Twin Cities said. “I think it's too bad we missed an opportunity this last summer to protest the All-Star game when it was here in Minneapolis. One thing I would like to say is that I would like to give credit and thank Vernon Bellecourt who is the founding father in the fight against Native mascots. He truly deserves the credit.”</span></p><p><span>Elias plans to continue the battle by focusing on schools and using anti-bullying policies to target those who wear native mascot gear to school.</span></p><p><span>#NotYourMascot is a coalition of grassroots organizations including Idle No More-Twin Cities, AIM-Twin Cities, AIM Patrol of Minneapolis, United Urban Warrior Society, Idle No More-Wisconsin, Protect Our Manoomin, Twin Cities Save the Kids, Minnesota Two Spirit Society and several other organizations.</span></p><p><span>The march and rally for the Minnesota-Washington football game, which drew a crowd of between 3,500 and 5,000 people from across North America who marched on the stadium from several directions, was the largest so far to protest the use of native mascots by sports teams. Organizers vowed to protest at each of the remaining Washington football games this season. On Nov. 23, hundreds of protesters took to the streets in San Francisco before the San Francisco-Washington game.</span></p><p><span>Opposition to the Washington team name includes numerous tribal organizations and tribal leaders, the National Congress of American Indians, the U.S. Congress, President Barack Obama, civil rights and religious groups, players and former players. Representatives of most of these groups spoke at the Minneapolis rally.</span></p><p><span>“I think the thing that struck me the most while I was marching was the notion that this was, in essence, a civil rights march,” DesJarlait said. “We were marching against discrimination, in particular, discriminatory imagery that is not only evoked by Dan Snyder, but discriminatory imagery that is embedded in the history between Euro-Americans and Native Americans … One approach to maintain pressure on Dan Snyder is to establish a nationwide alliance – an alliance that is inclusive of all the various anti-mascot organizations and also include non-Native groups. If more emphasis is placed on civil rights, public support would broaden. At present, Snyder doesn't accept that his team's name is racist. But the dynamics of civil rights would force the issue of the racism that is inherent in the team's name.”</span></p><p><span>Yvonne Barrett, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe and her daughter, Mika, joined the march that began at Northrup Auditorium. She was struck by the number of fans entering the game who pushed back at the protest.</span></p><p><span>“At the TCF stadium, the group walked past several football fans – both for Minnesota and Washington. I overheard one Vikings fan say to a rally participant, ‘I don’t know what you guys are making a big deal about. They’ve had the mascot for years. It’s tradition.’ Obviously, he has a different frame of reference for what tradition means,” she said. “The rally made my daughter and I feel a lot of pride for being part of a community that doesn’t tolerate racist stereotypes in sports media and is speaking up.”</span></p><p><span>Jase Roe, who helped organize the rally and march for the Minnesota Two Spirit Society, said racist mascots are a symptom of a deeper issue. “I grew up being ashamed of who I was,” he told the crowd gathered at American Indian OIC before the two and a half-mile march. “For many of us today, it’s more than a mascot or a name. It’s about taking pride in who we are.”</span></p><p><span>After the rally, Barrett called on leaders who spoke that day to continue the fight.</span></p><p><span>Speakers at the rally included leaders of many native nations from Minnesota and elsewhere, members of Congress, former NFL players, the mayor of Minneapolis and representatives of national groups such as the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media.</span></p><p><span>“The march definitely brought the community together. I saw so many individuals, families and community organizations come together to have a united voice about the mascot issue,” Barrett said. “I hope that the enthusiasm and spirit of the day doesn’t end with the rally. We need to have the leaders that were present continue to push the issue forward.”</span></p><p><span><em>Art Coulson, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, is a veteran journalist and author who lives in the Twin Cities.</em></span><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">&nbsp;</span></p><p><span><em><strong>EDITOR'S NOTE:</strong>&nbsp;The National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media organized the rally that began at TCF Stadium. The #NotYourMascot march was organized by a coalition of grassroots organizations not formally affiliated with NCARSM.</em></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/105348"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/01/15/mascot-protest-spurs-continued-momentum#comments #notyourmascot Local Minnesota Race/Ethnicity Sports Thu, 15 Jan 2015 13:42:01 +0000 Art Coulson 105348 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net OPINION | Black athletes weigh in on police violence http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/18/opinion-black-athletes-weigh-police-violence <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/12/18/opinion-black-athletes-weigh-police-violence" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/18/sports_view_breathe.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/charles-hallman" title="View user profile.">Charles Hallman</a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Recent events of police brutality, a problem that Blacks in this country have faced for decades, have pushed Black athletes out of their normal say-nothing postures.<!--break--></p><p>Several NBA players and two college teams last week donned “I Can’t Breathe” t-shirts during warm-ups. Pro football players emerged from the locker room with their hands up. All this was in protest over what happened in Ferguson, New York City, Cleveland, and across this country from sea to shining sea to thousands of Blacks who have had their lives snuffed out by police officers over the years.</p><p>Is it about time?</p><p>“Every generation going all the way back to Jack Johnson in the turn of the 20<sup>th</sup> century has made statements. I think this generation is no different simply because they didn’t speak up when many of us thought they should have,” explained Dr. Harry Edwards last week on NBA Radio. “Somehow, this notion took hold that these athletes were making too much money; they were too corporatized and commoditized to take a position. I think that was all premature.”</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com">Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/12/12/five-big-steps-across-the-achievement-gap/"><em>Five big steps across the achievement gap</em></a></li><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/12/17/preventive-medicine-police-stops-a-discussion-for-the-times/"><em>Preventive medicine: Police stops, a discussion for the times</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p>Edwards says he was proud a couple of years ago when the Miami Heat players wore hoodies during pregame warm-ups to protest the Trayvon Martin killing.</p><p>“They…have a voice that is legitimate,” said President Obama last week in an ESPN Radio interview. “Some of our greatest sports heroes — Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell, Arthur Ashe — they spoke out on issues that mattered at pretty critical times,” he said, adding that athletes are citizens, too.</p><p>However, some think a Black player or a Black president should stay in their place and out of such issues as police brutality against folk that looks like them. But Edwards quickly noted that it doesn’t matter whether you are a pro athlete or a former community organizer who was elected U.S. president six years ago: “I don’t care if you are living in a gated community and making $13 to $30 million dollars a year as a professional athlete,: the reality is that we tend to respond and identify to those things that potentially victimize us and those that we love.</p><p>“Whether you’re Kobe Bryant or LeBron James or Derrick Rose, if you are a Black male, the potential is that at some point you’re going to have some kind of a face-off with a police officer. I have been pulled over and have been in a heated debate with a police officer [or] stopped while walking in a city that I have lived in for over 47 years in the same house with the same woman.”</p><p>I’ve been stopped more than once by police in my hometown, in this town, and in other towns during my lifetime. I saw my father who was in his 60s called a boy by a White policeman while his young son watched during a supposed stop for a traffic violation that occurred only in the policeman’s imagination. I grew up in Detroit more afraid of the men in blue than of any criminal because the then-police commissioner publicly declared all Black young men my age and older as “cold hard thugs.”</p><p>I instructed both my sons to always have their hands in full view when stopped by police, never make any sudden moves, and say ‘Yes, officer’ when asked to respond.</p><p>There are times, nonetheless, when Black pro athletes can’t be “sideline participators,” believes Edwards. “But I also think there are issues…that become so pervasive and so fundamental to life and culture in this society that if you have a studied, intelligent point of view, you should express that,” he advised. “I think that there is an obligation to speak up on these types of issues irrespective of your station and position in this country. It’s about being an American citizen in the 21<sup>st</sup> century.”</p><p>I wore black clothing last Sunday as instructed by AME Church Senior Bishop John Bryant to show that Black life matters. I asked Minnesota Timberwolves guard-forward Corey Brewer after his game Sunday night if he was aware of this. “I didn’t know that. I got my black [jacket] on,” he said. “I think it’s good that athletes are starting to step up to speak out.”</p><p>“Everybody that has a stake in this thing is going to have to be around the table — police, the politicians, the pastors, the community activists, and the young people” to work for change, said Edwards. “The only real issue is how many burned buildings are we going to have to climb over to get to the table.”</p><p><em>Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">challman</span> [at] <span class="d">spokesman-recorder [dot] com</span></span>.</em></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recent events of police brutality, a problem that Blacks in this country have faced for decades, have pushed Black athletes out of their normal say-nothing postures.<!--break--></p><p>Several NBA players and two college teams last week donned “I Can’t Breathe” t-shirts during warm-ups. Pro football players emerged from the locker room with their hands up. All this was in protest over what happened in Ferguson, New York City, Cleveland, and across this country from sea to shining sea to thousands of Blacks who have had their lives snuffed out by police officers over the years.</p><p>Is it about time?</p><p>“Every generation going all the way back to Jack Johnson in the turn of the 20<sup>th</sup> century has made statements. I think this generation is no different simply because they didn’t speak up when many of us thought they should have,” explained Dr. Harry Edwards last week on NBA Radio. “Somehow, this notion took hold that these athletes were making too much money; they were too corporatized and commoditized to take a position. I think that was all premature.”</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com">Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/12/12/five-big-steps-across-the-achievement-gap/"><em>Five big steps across the achievement gap</em></a></li><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/12/17/preventive-medicine-police-stops-a-discussion-for-the-times/"><em>Preventive medicine: Police stops, a discussion for the times</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p>Edwards says he was proud a couple of years ago when the Miami Heat players wore hoodies during pregame warm-ups to protest the Trayvon Martin killing.</p><p>“They…have a voice that is legitimate,” said President Obama last week in an ESPN Radio interview. “Some of our greatest sports heroes — Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell, Arthur Ashe — they spoke out on issues that mattered at pretty critical times,” he said, adding that athletes are citizens, too.</p><p>However, some think a Black player or a Black president should stay in their place and out of such issues as police brutality against folk that looks like them. But Edwards quickly noted that it doesn’t matter whether you are a pro athlete or a former community organizer who was elected U.S. president six years ago: “I don’t care if you are living in a gated community and making $13 to $30 million dollars a year as a professional athlete,: the reality is that we tend to respond and identify to those things that potentially victimize us and those that we love.</p><p>“Whether you’re Kobe Bryant or LeBron James or Derrick Rose, if you are a Black male, the potential is that at some point you’re going to have some kind of a face-off with a police officer. I have been pulled over and have been in a heated debate with a police officer [or] stopped while walking in a city that I have lived in for over 47 years in the same house with the same woman.”</p><p>I’ve been stopped more than once by police in my hometown, in this town, and in other towns during my lifetime. I saw my father who was in his 60s called a boy by a White policeman while his young son watched during a supposed stop for a traffic violation that occurred only in the policeman’s imagination. I grew up in Detroit more afraid of the men in blue than of any criminal because the then-police commissioner publicly declared all Black young men my age and older as “cold hard thugs.”</p><p>I instructed both my sons to always have their hands in full view when stopped by police, never make any sudden moves, and say ‘Yes, officer’ when asked to respond.</p><p>There are times, nonetheless, when Black pro athletes can’t be “sideline participators,” believes Edwards. “But I also think there are issues…that become so pervasive and so fundamental to life and culture in this society that if you have a studied, intelligent point of view, you should express that,” he advised. “I think that there is an obligation to speak up on these types of issues irrespective of your station and position in this country. It’s about being an American citizen in the 21<sup>st</sup> century.”</p><p>I wore black clothing last Sunday as instructed by AME Church Senior Bishop John Bryant to show that Black life matters. I asked Minnesota Timberwolves guard-forward Corey Brewer after his game Sunday night if he was aware of this. “I didn’t know that. I got my black [jacket] on,” he said. “I think it’s good that athletes are starting to step up to speak out.”</p><p>“Everybody that has a stake in this thing is going to have to be around the table — police, the politicians, the pastors, the community activists, and the young people” to work for change, said Edwards. “The only real issue is how many burned buildings are we going to have to climb over to get to the table.”</p><p><em>Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">challman</span> [at] <span class="d">spokesman-recorder [dot] com</span></span>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104719"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/18/opinion-black-athletes-weigh-police-violence#comments #blacklivesmatter #Ferguson #ICantBreathe Eric Garner Michael Brown Mike Brown police misconduct Opinion Race/Ethnicity Sports Thu, 18 Dec 2014 20:40:30 +0000 104719 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Minnesota State High School League adopts trans-inclusive policy http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/04/minnesota-state-high-school-league-adopts-trans-inclusive-policy <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/12/04/minnesota-state-high-school-league-adopts-trans-inclusive-policy" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/04/mshsl-620x449.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/andy-birkey" title="View user profile.">Andy Birkey</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Colu.mn </div> </div> </div> <p>The Minnesota State High School League passed a policy on Thursday morning that provide a framework for schools to allow transgender students to participate in high school extracurricular activities including athletics.<!--break--></p><p>The board voted to send a fact-sheet on transgender students to all MSHSL member schools in the state, and approved a policy that provides for an appeal process for students who have transitioned their gender. The policy says, in part, “In accordance with applicable state and federal laws, rules and regulations, the Minnesota State High School League allows participation for all students regardless of their gender identity or expression in an environment free from discrimination with an equal opportunity for participation in athletics and fine arts.”</p><p>The vote was nearly unanimous with one vote against the policy, and one abstention.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Read more</strong> TC Daily Planet <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/category/tags/minnesota-state-high-school-league">coverage of the MSHSL's trans-inclusive policy</a>.</p></blockquote><p>Here’s the copy of the proposal:</p><p><iframe style="width: 100%; height: 500px; border: none;" src="//docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthecolu.mn%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F12%2FParticipationInMSHSLActivities12_4_14.pdf&amp;hl=en_US&amp;embedded=true" scrolling="no" width="320" height="240"></iframe></p><p class="gde-text"><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/ParticipationInMSHSLActivities12_4_14.pdf" class="gde-link">Download (PDF, 93KB)</a></p><p>The vote came after nearly two hours of public comment and board debate. An original vote in early October was tabled after the opposition, led by the Minnesota Child Protection League, took out a full-page ad in the Star Tribune.</p><p>The opposition at the hearing was almost exclusively religious:</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1990.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1990.jpg" alt="IMG_1990" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-15076" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> One sign reads, “We are against transgender policy. God bless our nation.”</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1991.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1991.jpg" alt="IMG_1991" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-15077" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> Another sign read, “God is love, but he doesn’t stand for sin.”</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1983.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1983.jpg" alt="IMG_1983" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-15078" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> A sign read, “A woman must not wear men’s clothing, nor a man wear woman’s clothing, for the Lord your God detests anyone who does this -Deuteronomy 22:5″</p><p>The hearing room was crowded to capacity on Wednesday, and Brooklyn Center police were on hand to diffuse arguments and ensure the room stayed at capacity.</p><p>Board member John Millea tweeted some of the confrontations:</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea1.png" width="512" height="219" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea2.png" width="511" height="198" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea3.png" width="509" height="219" /></p><p>Before passing the new policy, the board heard from organizations representing religious interests, as well as LGBT advocacy organizations. Just before the vote, the board heard from several transgender youth who urged the board to pass the policy.</p><p>The policy will go into effect at the start of the 2015-2016 school year.</p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Minnesota State High School League passed a policy on Thursday morning that provide a framework for schools to allow transgender students to participate in high school extracurricular activities including athletics.<!--break--></p><p>The board voted to send a fact-sheet on transgender students to all MSHSL member schools in the state, and approved a policy that provides for an appeal process for students who have transitioned their gender. The policy says, in part, “In accordance with applicable state and federal laws, rules and regulations, the Minnesota State High School League allows participation for all students regardless of their gender identity or expression in an environment free from discrimination with an equal opportunity for participation in athletics and fine arts.”</p><p>The vote was nearly unanimous with one vote against the policy, and one abstention.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Read more</strong> TC Daily Planet <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/category/tags/minnesota-state-high-school-league">coverage of the MSHSL's trans-inclusive policy</a>.</p></blockquote><p>Here’s the copy of the proposal:</p><p><iframe style="width: 100%; height: 500px; border: none;" src="//docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthecolu.mn%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F12%2FParticipationInMSHSLActivities12_4_14.pdf&amp;hl=en_US&amp;embedded=true" scrolling="no" width="320" height="240"></iframe></p><p class="gde-text"><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/ParticipationInMSHSLActivities12_4_14.pdf" class="gde-link">Download (PDF, 93KB)</a></p><p>The vote came after nearly two hours of public comment and board debate. An original vote in early October was tabled after the opposition, led by the Minnesota Child Protection League, took out a full-page ad in the Star Tribune.</p><p>The opposition at the hearing was almost exclusively religious:</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1990.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1990.jpg" alt="IMG_1990" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-15076" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> One sign reads, “We are against transgender policy. God bless our nation.”</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1991.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1991.jpg" alt="IMG_1991" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-15077" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> Another sign read, “God is love, but he doesn’t stand for sin.”</p><p><a href="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1983.jpg"><img src="http://thecolu.mn/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_1983.jpg" alt="IMG_1983" class="aligncenter size-medium wp-image-15078" width="480" height="640" /></a><br /> A sign read, “A woman must not wear men’s clothing, nor a man wear woman’s clothing, for the Lord your God detests anyone who does this -Deuteronomy 22:5″</p><p>The hearing room was crowded to capacity on Wednesday, and Brooklyn Center police were on hand to diffuse arguments and ensure the room stayed at capacity.</p><p>Board member John Millea tweeted some of the confrontations:</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea1.png" width="512" height="219" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea2.png" width="511" height="198" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/December/millea3.png" width="509" height="219" /></p><p>Before passing the new policy, the board heard from organizations representing religious interests, as well as LGBT advocacy organizations. Just before the vote, the board heard from several transgender youth who urged the board to pass the policy.</p><p>The policy will go into effect at the start of the 2015-2016 school year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Colu.mn </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104296"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/04/minnesota-state-high-school-league-adopts-trans-inclusive-policy#comments Minnesota State High School League transgender Gender/GLBT Minnesota Religion Sports Youth Youth Policy Thu, 04 Dec 2014 20:20:17 +0000 104296 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Support for transgender students grows around the state ahead of policy vote http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/03/support-transgender-students-grows-around-state-ahead-policy-vote <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/12/03/support-transgender-students-grows-around-state-ahead-policy-vote" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/03/inclusivead.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/andy-birkey" title="View user profile.">Andy Birkey</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Colu.mn </div> </div> </div> <p>Just before the Minnesota State High School League’s proposed vote in early October on a trans-inclusive high school athletics policy, support poured in for transgender students. Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, council members Barbara Johnson and Elizabeth Glidden, Sen. Scott Dibble, the president of Minnesota’s pro-soccer club Minnesota United, the Star Tribune Editorial Board, and the state’s teachers union Education Minnesota all wrote statements in <a href="http://thecolu.mn/13721/support-pours-transgender-students-ahead-mshsl-vote">support of transgender students.<!--break--></a>The MSHSL voted to table the policy and instead take up a vote on the issue on Thursday, Dec. 4. In the past few weeks, more support has poured in for the policy and for transgender students.</p><p>The Minneapolis Commission on Civil Rights pass a resolution in support of the policy on Nov. 17.</p><p><span style="vertical-align: bottom; width: 552px; height: 626px;"><iframe style="visibility: visible; width: 552px; height: 626px;" title="fb:post Facebook Social Plugin" name="f25a8eec6b1206" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?app_id=&amp;channel=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.ak.facebook.com%2Fconnect%2Fxd_arbiter%2F7r8gQb8MIqE.js%3Fversion%3D41%23cb%3Df23fafe8d0a788c%26domain%3Dthecolu.mn%26origin%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fthecolu.mn%252Ff1963a859b88c1e%26relation%3Dparent.parent&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fphoto.php%3Ffbid%3D10105440824491040%26set%3Da.10100149976607610.2857475.13919246%26type%3D1%26theater&amp;locale=en_US&amp;sdk=joey" scrolling="no" width="1000px" frameborder="0" height="1000px"></iframe></span></p><p>Writing in the <a href="http://www.startribune.com/opinion/284541571.html">Star Tribune</a>, Peggy Brenden, the first girl to play on a boys’ team in Minnesota, noted that the same arguments being used to oppose the trans-inclusive policy were used to oppose equal opportunities for girls.</p><blockquote><p>I experienced an unsettling flashback as I read the full-page ad run by Child Protection League Action (CPLA) in this past Sunday’s Star Tribune. The purpose of the ad was to rally citizens to attend Thursday’s Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) meeting, where the issue of transgender student participation in athletics will be addressed. The CPLA forecasts a dim future for “student bodily privacy, safety, dignity and the future of athletics” if transgender students are allowed to “choose their gender team.”</p><p>Though I am not transgender, I may have some helpful insights. Some 40 years ago, I was the first girl in Minnesota to participate on a boys’ interscholastic athletic team — the tennis team at St. Cloud Tech. Fears about “bodily privacy, safety, dignity and the future of athletics” were also rampant back in 1972 when I put on the Tech Tiger warm-up and stepped out onto the court…<br /> The CPLA folks fear that the MSHSL will allow transgender athletes to participate on the team that is consistent with their gender identity. In big, bold letters their ad asks: “Are you willing to let this happen?”</p><p>I certainly hope we are.</p></blockquote><p>John Jasper Jr., sports reporter for the Winona Daily News, <a href="http://www.winonadailynews.com/sports/high-school/john-casper-jr-approving-transgender-participation-policy-is-right-thing/article_1bdb6af4-5458-5c17-a374-bb4f81e8a813.html">penned a commentary in support of transgender youth</a> on Tuesday.</p><blockquote><p>The Minnesota State High School League Board of Directors has a second chance to do the right thing Thursday morning.</p><p>The first action item on the agenda of the board’s quarterly meeting is a vote on a transgender participation policy. Two months ago, voting was tabled to allow further study of the policy, which would give schools a framework for determining transgender student eligibility. Student athletes would be allowed to participate in athletics for the gender team they feel matches their gender-related identity.</p><p>It should have been approved in October. Heck, it should have been proposed and approved before then.</p></blockquote><p><a href="http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/content/iron-rangers-view-minnesota-state-high-school-league-watered-down-policy-transgender">Duluth News Tribune opinion writer</a> Joseph Legueri backed the policy earlier this month and chided the MSHSL for backing down to the MNCPL:</p><blockquote><p>Are transgender students not a part of the high school also? Are they not a part of the 200,000 high school students who participate in athletics and fine-arts competitions statewide each year? Did the MSHSL provide the necessary leadership to ensure transgender students have an equal opportunity to participate? Did the MSHSL provide the necessary leadership to ensure transgender students will be included, and not excluded, from high school activities?</p><p>The MSHSL did not.</p></blockquote><p>Knight Errant, the student newspaper of Benilde-St. Margaret’s School in St. Louis Park,<a href="http://bsmknighterrant.org/commentary/2014/10/20/mshsl-ruling-discriminates-against-transgender-students/"> backed the policy</a>:</p><blockquote><p>As a Catholic school, we know the importance of breaking down systems of oppression and fighting the marginalization of historically underrepresented groups. No matter how small a group, no community deserves to be subjected to exclusion, harassment, or violence. By not taking a stand for trans* students and their rights, you are condoning trans*phobia.</p></blockquote><p>Sean Cork, writer for the St. Louis Park Echo, the newspaper for St. Louis Park High School,<a href="http://slpecho.com/opinion/columns/2014/11/13/setting-new-boundaries/"> backed the policy</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Denying people the chance to play their favorite sport just because they associate with a different gender is not fair or reasonable. Students can feel victimised because they associate as a transgender. Not being able to be yourself is severely detrimental to a person’s health and confidence. Many transgender students struggle to fit in with their fellow peers. Many school administrators agree the new guidelines are a good way for students to open up for their peers and not be scared to be themselves. The new guidelines would fill the gap between associated gender and sports by allowing some transgender students to play on sport teams of the gender they define themselves as.</p></blockquote><p><strong><em>Related stories:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104155">Star Tribune publishes second anti-transgender ad</a> (Kristoffer Tigue, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103867">OPINION | MN Child Protection League continues its assault on LGBT community</a> (Claire-Renee Kohner, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102151">Minnesota League tables trans-inclusive policy under mounting opposition</a> (Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102502">BEHIND THE STORY | What's so problematic about equal rights?</a> (Sheila Regan, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102008">Star Tribune runs full-page anti-transgender ad</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/101913">State athletics league mulls transgender inclusion in sports</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li></ul><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Just before the Minnesota State High School League’s proposed vote in early October on a trans-inclusive high school athletics policy, support poured in for transgender students. Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, council members Barbara Johnson and Elizabeth Glidden, Sen. Scott Dibble, the president of Minnesota’s pro-soccer club Minnesota United, the Star Tribune Editorial Board, and the state’s teachers union Education Minnesota all wrote statements in <a href="http://thecolu.mn/13721/support-pours-transgender-students-ahead-mshsl-vote">support of transgender students.<!--break--></a>The MSHSL voted to table the policy and instead take up a vote on the issue on Thursday, Dec. 4. In the past few weeks, more support has poured in for the policy and for transgender students.</p><p>The Minneapolis Commission on Civil Rights pass a resolution in support of the policy on Nov. 17.</p><p><span style="vertical-align: bottom; width: 552px; height: 626px;"><iframe style="visibility: visible; width: 552px; height: 626px;" title="fb:post Facebook Social Plugin" name="f25a8eec6b1206" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?app_id=&amp;channel=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.ak.facebook.com%2Fconnect%2Fxd_arbiter%2F7r8gQb8MIqE.js%3Fversion%3D41%23cb%3Df23fafe8d0a788c%26domain%3Dthecolu.mn%26origin%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fthecolu.mn%252Ff1963a859b88c1e%26relation%3Dparent.parent&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fphoto.php%3Ffbid%3D10105440824491040%26set%3Da.10100149976607610.2857475.13919246%26type%3D1%26theater&amp;locale=en_US&amp;sdk=joey" scrolling="no" width="1000px" frameborder="0" height="1000px"></iframe></span></p><p>Writing in the <a href="http://www.startribune.com/opinion/284541571.html">Star Tribune</a>, Peggy Brenden, the first girl to play on a boys’ team in Minnesota, noted that the same arguments being used to oppose the trans-inclusive policy were used to oppose equal opportunities for girls.</p><blockquote><p>I experienced an unsettling flashback as I read the full-page ad run by Child Protection League Action (CPLA) in this past Sunday’s Star Tribune. The purpose of the ad was to rally citizens to attend Thursday’s Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) meeting, where the issue of transgender student participation in athletics will be addressed. The CPLA forecasts a dim future for “student bodily privacy, safety, dignity and the future of athletics” if transgender students are allowed to “choose their gender team.”</p><p>Though I am not transgender, I may have some helpful insights. Some 40 years ago, I was the first girl in Minnesota to participate on a boys’ interscholastic athletic team — the tennis team at St. Cloud Tech. Fears about “bodily privacy, safety, dignity and the future of athletics” were also rampant back in 1972 when I put on the Tech Tiger warm-up and stepped out onto the court…<br /> The CPLA folks fear that the MSHSL will allow transgender athletes to participate on the team that is consistent with their gender identity. In big, bold letters their ad asks: “Are you willing to let this happen?”</p><p>I certainly hope we are.</p></blockquote><p>John Jasper Jr., sports reporter for the Winona Daily News, <a href="http://www.winonadailynews.com/sports/high-school/john-casper-jr-approving-transgender-participation-policy-is-right-thing/article_1bdb6af4-5458-5c17-a374-bb4f81e8a813.html">penned a commentary in support of transgender youth</a> on Tuesday.</p><blockquote><p>The Minnesota State High School League Board of Directors has a second chance to do the right thing Thursday morning.</p><p>The first action item on the agenda of the board’s quarterly meeting is a vote on a transgender participation policy. Two months ago, voting was tabled to allow further study of the policy, which would give schools a framework for determining transgender student eligibility. Student athletes would be allowed to participate in athletics for the gender team they feel matches their gender-related identity.</p><p>It should have been approved in October. Heck, it should have been proposed and approved before then.</p></blockquote><p><a href="http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/content/iron-rangers-view-minnesota-state-high-school-league-watered-down-policy-transgender">Duluth News Tribune opinion writer</a> Joseph Legueri backed the policy earlier this month and chided the MSHSL for backing down to the MNCPL:</p><blockquote><p>Are transgender students not a part of the high school also? Are they not a part of the 200,000 high school students who participate in athletics and fine-arts competitions statewide each year? Did the MSHSL provide the necessary leadership to ensure transgender students have an equal opportunity to participate? Did the MSHSL provide the necessary leadership to ensure transgender students will be included, and not excluded, from high school activities?</p><p>The MSHSL did not.</p></blockquote><p>Knight Errant, the student newspaper of Benilde-St. Margaret’s School in St. Louis Park,<a href="http://bsmknighterrant.org/commentary/2014/10/20/mshsl-ruling-discriminates-against-transgender-students/"> backed the policy</a>:</p><blockquote><p>As a Catholic school, we know the importance of breaking down systems of oppression and fighting the marginalization of historically underrepresented groups. No matter how small a group, no community deserves to be subjected to exclusion, harassment, or violence. By not taking a stand for trans* students and their rights, you are condoning trans*phobia.</p></blockquote><p>Sean Cork, writer for the St. Louis Park Echo, the newspaper for St. Louis Park High School,<a href="http://slpecho.com/opinion/columns/2014/11/13/setting-new-boundaries/"> backed the policy</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Denying people the chance to play their favorite sport just because they associate with a different gender is not fair or reasonable. Students can feel victimised because they associate as a transgender. Not being able to be yourself is severely detrimental to a person’s health and confidence. Many transgender students struggle to fit in with their fellow peers. Many school administrators agree the new guidelines are a good way for students to open up for their peers and not be scared to be themselves. The new guidelines would fill the gap between associated gender and sports by allowing some transgender students to play on sport teams of the gender they define themselves as.</p></blockquote><p><strong><em>Related stories:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104155">Star Tribune publishes second anti-transgender ad</a> (Kristoffer Tigue, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103867">OPINION | MN Child Protection League continues its assault on LGBT community</a> (Claire-Renee Kohner, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102151">Minnesota League tables trans-inclusive policy under mounting opposition</a> (Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102502">BEHIND THE STORY | What's so problematic about equal rights?</a> (Sheila Regan, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102008">Star Tribune runs full-page anti-transgender ad</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/101913">State athletics league mulls transgender inclusion in sports</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li></ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Colu.mn </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104257"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/12/03/support-transgender-students-grows-around-state-ahead-policy-vote#comments Minnesota State High School League transgender Gender/GLBT Minnesota Religion Sports Youth Youth Policy Wed, 03 Dec 2014 20:51:14 +0000 104257 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net CPL sent anti-transgender direct mail across state to derail MN State High School League policy http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/blog/sally-jo-sorensen/cpl-sent-anti-trangender-direct-mail-across-state-derail-mn-state-high-school <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/sally-jo-sorensen" title="View user profile.">Sally Jo Sorensen</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/full/14/02/6a00d834516a0869e201b7c7150c8e970b-800wi.jpg" alt="" title="" width="360" height="185" class="imagecache imagecache-full imagecache-default imagecache-full_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>The full-page newspaper ad that the Child Protection League (CPL) took out i<a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2014/11/full-page-cpl-anti-trans-ad-also-published-in-duluth-mankato-stcloud-winona-dailies.html" target="_self">n the Star Tribune, Duluth News Tribune, Mankato Free Press, St. Cloud Times and the Winona Daily News</a> is not the only medium that the conservative anti-LGBT group is using to frighten Minnesotans about young transgender athletes.<!--break--></p><p>The CPL's campaign aims to derail a policy that the Minnesota State High School League has proposed for <a href="http://blogs.mprnews.org/newscut/2014/11/opposition-mobilizes-again-to-mshsl-transgender-policy/" target="_self">compliance with a U.S. Department of Education update to Title IX.</a></p><p>A source in the Little Falls area gave us the heads up about the mailer, but had not kept the oversize postcard the household secured. Via Facebook, we crowdsourced a request for a copy and received this version of the card, which was received by a household in St. Cloud.</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com">Bluestem Prairie</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Bluestem Prairie stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2014/11/full-page-cpl-anti-trans-ad-also-published-in-duluth-mankato-stcloud-winona-dailies.html"><em>Full-page CPL anti-trans ad also published in Duluth, Mankato, St.Cloud &amp; Winona dailies</em></a></li><li><a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2014/11/jeff-backers-campaign-posts-big-stone-co-chair-resignation-news-on-facebook-without-comment.html"><em>Jeff Backer's campaign posts Big Stone Co GOP chair resignation news release without comment</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p>The Column's Andy Birkey also informs us that the postcard has been sent to households in the Mankato area.</p><p>It's clear that the CPL and its anti-LGBT allies are spending a great deal of money on this campaign.</p><p>On Sunday, Bluestem reviewed the newspaper ad buys statewide in <a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2014/11/full-page-cpl-anti-trans-ad-also-published-in-duluth-mankato-stcloud-winona-dailies.html" target="_self">Full-page CPL anti-trans ad also published in Duluth, Mankato, St.Cloud &amp; Winona dailies.</a></p><p>A source in Little Falls tells us that the full-page ad was also published on Sunday in the Morrison County Record, a weekly newspaper owned by <a href="http://ecmpublishers.com/" target="_self">ECM Publishers</a>.</p><p><strong>What's the issue?</strong></p><p>Minnesota News Cut bogger Bob Collins summarized the issue in <a href="http://blogs.mprnews.org/newscut/2014/11/opposition-mobilizes-again-to-mshsl-transgender-policy/" rel="bookmark">Opposition mobilizes again to MSHSL transgender policy</a>:</p><blockquote><p>The conservative group that’s opposed to the Minnesota State High School League’s proposed policy for transgender athletes has pulled another full-page ad out of the “say what?” file.</p><p>The MSHSL proposed policy is meant to comply with a U.S. Department of Education update to Title IX requirements, which say the civil rights law extends to all students, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.</p><p>The League shied away from a decision earlier this year after the Child Protection League <a href="http://blogs.mprnews.org/newscut/2014/09/opponents-of-mn-transgender-athletes-hit-the-showers/" title="Opponents of MN transgender athletes hit the showers">claimed it would result in boys taking showers with women.</a></p></blockquote><p>The Column's Andy Birkey has more in <a href="http://thecolu.mn/14835/religious-right-catholic-church-continue-fight-trans-inclusive-athletics-policy" target="_self">Religious Right, Catholic Church continue fight against trans-inclusive athletics policy</a>.</p><p><strong><em>Related stories:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104155">Star Tribune publishes second anti-transgender ad</a> (Kristoffer Tigue, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103867">OPINION | MN Child Protection League continues its assault on LGBT community</a> (Claire-Renee Kohner, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102151">Minnesota League tables trans-inclusive policy under mounting opposition</a> (Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102502">BEHIND THE STORY | What's so problematic about equal rights?</a> (Sheila Regan, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102008">Star Tribune runs full-page anti-transgender ad</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/101913">State athletics league mulls transgender inclusion in sports</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li></ul><div class="field field-address"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="postal adr postal-address"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-column"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bluestem-prairie">Bluestem Prairie </a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/partners/bluestem-prairie">Bluestem Prairie</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104229"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/blog/sally-jo-sorensen/cpl-sent-anti-trangender-direct-mail-across-state-derail-mn-state-high-school#comments Minnesota State High School League transgender Gender/GLBT Minnesota Religion Sports Youth Youth Policy Tue, 02 Dec 2014 20:17:50 +0000 104229 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Star Tribune publishes second anti-transgender ad http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/30/star-tribune-publishes-second-anti-transgender-ad <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/30/star-tribune-publishes-second-anti-transgender-ad" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/30/admain.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ktigue" title="View user profile.">Kristoffer Tigue</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>The Minnesota Child Protection League is at it again. The anti-LGBTQ organization paid for a second full-page anti-transgender ad in the Star Tribune’s Sunday paper this week. The ad comes as the Minnesota State High School League reconsiders this week whether or not to allow transgender high school students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.</p><p>“The end of girls’ sports?” reads the ad in bold letters at the top. “Her dreams of a scholarship shattered, your 14-year-old daughter just lost her position on an all-girl team to a male … and now she may have to shower with him. Are you willing to let that happen?”</p><p>The MPCL published <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/09/29/star-tribune-runs-full-page-anti-transgender-ad">an anti-transgender ad in the Star Tribune last September</a>,&nbsp;just before an October vote by MSHSL to allow transgender students to play sports based on their gender identity.</p><p>However, MSHSL decided to table that decision because of significant pressure from opposition, and <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/10/02/minnesota-league-tables-trans-inclusive-policy-under-mounting-opposition">postponed the vote until Dec. 4</a>.</p><p>Both ads have drawn major heat from the transgender community and civil rights advocates for the misleading fashion MPCL is portraying transgender people and the issue at hand.</p><p>Many voiced their outrage on Twitter, including NBC Sports writer Aaron Gleeman.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/stribad.jpg" width="519" height="565" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/stribad2.jpg" width="583" height="453" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t1.jpg" width="630" height="184" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t3.jpg" width="630" height="85" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t4.jpg" width="630" height="84" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t6.jpg" width="630" height="102" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Some Twitter users said that the photo in the ad is actually a stock photo, not a 14-year-old girl.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t2.jpg" width="630" height="101" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Others said the ad marginalizes the feelings and privacy rights of transgender people.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t5.jpg" width="630" height="102" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>But, fortunately for us, Twitter user the hella raddest made sure to point out maybe one of the most misleading parts of the ad.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t7.jpg" width="630" height="101" /></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Minnesota Child Protection League is at it again. The anti-LGBTQ organization paid for a second full-page anti-transgender ad in the Star Tribune’s Sunday paper this week. The ad comes as the Minnesota State High School League reconsiders this week whether or not to allow transgender high school students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.</p><p>“The end of girls’ sports?” reads the ad in bold letters at the top. “Her dreams of a scholarship shattered, your 14-year-old daughter just lost her position on an all-girl team to a male … and now she may have to shower with him. Are you willing to let that happen?”</p><p>The MPCL published <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/09/29/star-tribune-runs-full-page-anti-transgender-ad">an anti-transgender ad in the Star Tribune last September</a>,&nbsp;just before an October vote by MSHSL to allow transgender students to play sports based on their gender identity.</p><p>However, MSHSL decided to table that decision because of significant pressure from opposition, and <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/10/02/minnesota-league-tables-trans-inclusive-policy-under-mounting-opposition">postponed the vote until Dec. 4</a>.</p><p>Both ads have drawn major heat from the transgender community and civil rights advocates for the misleading fashion MPCL is portraying transgender people and the issue at hand.</p><p>Many voiced their outrage on Twitter, including NBC Sports writer Aaron Gleeman.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/stribad.jpg" width="519" height="565" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/stribad2.jpg" width="583" height="453" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t1.jpg" width="630" height="184" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t3.jpg" width="630" height="85" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t4.jpg" width="630" height="84" /></p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t6.jpg" width="630" height="102" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Some Twitter users said that the photo in the ad is actually a stock photo, not a 14-year-old girl.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t2.jpg" width="630" height="101" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Others said the ad marginalizes the feelings and privacy rights of transgender people.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t5.jpg" width="630" height="102" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>But, fortunately for us, Twitter user the hella raddest made sure to point out maybe one of the most misleading parts of the ad.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/t7.jpg" width="630" height="101" /></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Kristoffer Tigue </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104155"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/30/star-tribune-publishes-second-anti-transgender-ad#comments Minnesota Child Protection League Minnesota State High School League Star Tribune transgender Daily Planet Originals Gender/GLBT Local Minnesota Politics & Policy Sports Youth Youth Policy Sun, 30 Nov 2014 20:42:53 +0000 104155 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Twin Cities Black preachers unite against biased reporting http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/30/twin-cities-black-preachers-unite-against-biased-reporting <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/30/twin-cities-black-preachers-unite-against-biased-reporting" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/30/5483359493_bf22d7dc4a_o.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/charles-hallman" title="View user profile.">Charles Hallman</a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The local mainstream media has been “culturally arrogant” in its reporting of prominent Blacks, says a ministers’ group. His Works United, “an informal group” of nearly 20 clergy, told reporters at a November 24 morning press conference at New Salem Baptist Church in North Minneapolis that mainstream media outlets have “discounted our community” by not including diverse voices in their reporting.<!--break--></p><p>“We believe the voices of the broader African American community are not being heard,” said Rev. Alfred Babington-Johnson. “We will write three sets of letters” and send them this week to the National Football League, the Vikings organization, local media outlets, and the leaders of both political parties “on the unfair treatment of our community” and request to meet with these entities as well, he stated.</p><p>The recent suspension of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, and the ethics charges levied against the state’s only two Black senators, Jeff Hayden and Bobby Joe Champion, are the group’s main concerns, continued Babington-Johnson.</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com">Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/11/27/national-urban-league-finds-black-parents-support-common-core-state-standards/"><em>National Urban League finds Black parents support Common Core State Standards</em></a></li><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/11/28/cosby-still-darling-right/"><em>Cosby still the darling of the right?</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p>The NFL announced Peterson’s suspension November 18, two weeks after the player had pleaded no-contest to a misdemeanor — he was charged this fall with child abuse after disciplining his young son. “We do not condone child abuse of any kind,” said Babington-Johnson. “We are not even condoning excessive discipline, but we are standing up for fairness.”</p><p>However, it appears to the ministers that the league “has been sporadic and making it up as they go” in its punishment of Peterson, added the pastor. The player has filed an appeal and it is expected to be heard by an independent arbiter in December.</p><p>Hayden and Champion were brought up on ethics charges in October after the <em>Minneapolis Star Tribune</em> published an article citing an unnamed source that the two state senators had “bullied” the Minneapolis Public Schools into signing a contract with a local community organization. Babington-Johnson called this “an unprecedented personal political attack.”</p><p>In an earlier <em>MSR</em> published article by Isaac Peterson (“Hayden-Champion ethics hearings delayed: Republicans defend complaints; accused deny charges,” Nov. 13, 2014), State Senator David Hann was asked if he and his Republican colleagues had thoroughly examined the newspaper article.</p><p>“There were credible reports being made by the Minneapolis paper, which doesn’t typically report things of this nature unless they feel pretty sure their source is sound,” stated the senator. “You’re not required to do an investigation before you make a complaint. I talked to the reporter. They confirmed that their story was accurate.”</p><p>Babington-Johnson on Monday argued that the GOP’s use of a “highly flawed” newspaper article to file ethics charges against Senators Hayden and Champion was “appalling. We can only conclude that the basest form of politics and a desire to restrict and hinder the ability and effectiveness of these African American statesmen is at play. They [the two Black state senators] have been effective for their constituents.”</p><p>When a reporter asked if His Works United is the Black community’s spokesman, “I don’t think we are looking for the community to fall in line,” responded Babington-Johnson. “Our community is not monolithic — we have different points of view.”</p><p>Rev. Harding Smith of Spiritual Church of God in Robbinsdale told the <em>MSR</em> that his parishioners have expressed concern on how local media seems to have been mainly negative in its reporting of Peterson, Hayden and Champion. “We [as ministers and pastors] have been challenged by many of our members,” added Rev. Melvin Miller of Progressive Baptist Church in St. Paul. “They are really concerned that we get involved and articulate [their] concerns.”</p><p>“Our concerns are community concerns,” reiterated Babington-Johnson.</p><p>The <em>MSR</em> asked him if the KSTP-TV story that negatively linked a photo of Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and a Black male volunteer together fits their overall concerns of local mainstream media negative reporting of Blacks. “We are outraged by that,” Babington-Johnson confirmed. “It’s a series of things that have occurred” both locally and nationally.</p><p>“As African Americans, we see this phenomenon acted out day after day in ways that continue to put our community at a disadvantage as public discussions are held and public policies are made and enforced,” concluded Babington-Johnson. “African American people are not treated with the same respect [and] a sense of justice as [are] others in this society. We see this played out again and again.”</p><p><em>Additional reporting by </em>MSR<em> Contributing Writer Isaac Peterson was included in this report.</em></p><p><em>Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">challman</span> [at] <span class="d">spokesman-recorder [dot] com</span></span>.</em></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The local mainstream media has been “culturally arrogant” in its reporting of prominent Blacks, says a ministers’ group. His Works United, “an informal group” of nearly 20 clergy, told reporters at a November 24 morning press conference at New Salem Baptist Church in North Minneapolis that mainstream media outlets have “discounted our community” by not including diverse voices in their reporting.<!--break--></p><p>“We believe the voices of the broader African American community are not being heard,” said Rev. Alfred Babington-Johnson. “We will write three sets of letters” and send them this week to the National Football League, the Vikings organization, local media outlets, and the leaders of both political parties “on the unfair treatment of our community” and request to meet with these entities as well, he stated.</p><p>The recent suspension of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, and the ethics charges levied against the state’s only two Black senators, Jeff Hayden and Bobby Joe Champion, are the group’s main concerns, continued Babington-Johnson.</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com">Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/11/27/national-urban-league-finds-black-parents-support-common-core-state-standards/"><em>National Urban League finds Black parents support Common Core State Standards</em></a></li><li><a href="http://www.spokesman-recorder.com/2014/11/28/cosby-still-darling-right/"><em>Cosby still the darling of the right?</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p>The NFL announced Peterson’s suspension November 18, two weeks after the player had pleaded no-contest to a misdemeanor — he was charged this fall with child abuse after disciplining his young son. “We do not condone child abuse of any kind,” said Babington-Johnson. “We are not even condoning excessive discipline, but we are standing up for fairness.”</p><p>However, it appears to the ministers that the league “has been sporadic and making it up as they go” in its punishment of Peterson, added the pastor. The player has filed an appeal and it is expected to be heard by an independent arbiter in December.</p><p>Hayden and Champion were brought up on ethics charges in October after the <em>Minneapolis Star Tribune</em> published an article citing an unnamed source that the two state senators had “bullied” the Minneapolis Public Schools into signing a contract with a local community organization. Babington-Johnson called this “an unprecedented personal political attack.”</p><p>In an earlier <em>MSR</em> published article by Isaac Peterson (“Hayden-Champion ethics hearings delayed: Republicans defend complaints; accused deny charges,” Nov. 13, 2014), State Senator David Hann was asked if he and his Republican colleagues had thoroughly examined the newspaper article.</p><p>“There were credible reports being made by the Minneapolis paper, which doesn’t typically report things of this nature unless they feel pretty sure their source is sound,” stated the senator. “You’re not required to do an investigation before you make a complaint. I talked to the reporter. They confirmed that their story was accurate.”</p><p>Babington-Johnson on Monday argued that the GOP’s use of a “highly flawed” newspaper article to file ethics charges against Senators Hayden and Champion was “appalling. We can only conclude that the basest form of politics and a desire to restrict and hinder the ability and effectiveness of these African American statesmen is at play. They [the two Black state senators] have been effective for their constituents.”</p><p>When a reporter asked if His Works United is the Black community’s spokesman, “I don’t think we are looking for the community to fall in line,” responded Babington-Johnson. “Our community is not monolithic — we have different points of view.”</p><p>Rev. Harding Smith of Spiritual Church of God in Robbinsdale told the <em>MSR</em> that his parishioners have expressed concern on how local media seems to have been mainly negative in its reporting of Peterson, Hayden and Champion. “We [as ministers and pastors] have been challenged by many of our members,” added Rev. Melvin Miller of Progressive Baptist Church in St. Paul. “They are really concerned that we get involved and articulate [their] concerns.”</p><p>“Our concerns are community concerns,” reiterated Babington-Johnson.</p><p>The <em>MSR</em> asked him if the KSTP-TV story that negatively linked a photo of Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and a Black male volunteer together fits their overall concerns of local mainstream media negative reporting of Blacks. “We are outraged by that,” Babington-Johnson confirmed. “It’s a series of things that have occurred” both locally and nationally.</p><p>“As African Americans, we see this phenomenon acted out day after day in ways that continue to put our community at a disadvantage as public discussions are held and public policies are made and enforced,” concluded Babington-Johnson. “African American people are not treated with the same respect [and] a sense of justice as [are] others in this society. We see this played out again and again.”</p><p><em>Additional reporting by </em>MSR<em> Contributing Writer Isaac Peterson was included in this report.</em></p><p><em>Charles Hallman welcomes reader responses to <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">challman</span> [at] <span class="d">spokesman-recorder [dot] com</span></span>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/104142"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"></ul> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/30/twin-cities-black-preachers-unite-against-biased-reporting#comments #Pointergate Media Race/Ethnicity Sports Sun, 30 Nov 2014 19:47:15 +0000 104142 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net What the Puck? New Swedish playground-like sport to come to St. Paul http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/23/what-puck-new-swedish-playground-sport-come-st-paul <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/23/what-puck-new-swedish-playground-sport-come-st-paul" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/23/011_glosoliatelje_davidpuigserinya_dsc0175.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jonas-warlich" title="View user profile.">Jonas Warlich</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>The midfielder is moving the ball through the center circle. He’s dribbling past a defender, looks for a teammate, passes the ball and it stops because of a bump in the field, right in front of the eighteen-yard box. Welcome to <a href="http://puckelball.com/info.html">the game of Puckelball</a>.</p><p><!--break--></p><p>The innovative playground-style sport may be making its debut in the United States next year. Local soccer non-profit Joy of the People (JOTP) and Swedish artist and Puckelball inventor Johan Ström are planning on installing one of the bumpy soccer fields in St. Paul as soon as 2015. It will be the third field in the world and the first one outside of Sweden, and would cost around $500,000 to build.</p><p>Ström teamed up with St. Paul nonprofit Joy of the People, who will be paying for the field, and presented their idea to the public on Nov. 18 at Urban Growler brewery.</p><p>“We like to relate sports to life but a normal soccer field does not represent life properly,” Ström said. “Life is not smooth and even, you never know where the ball will bounce. Sometimes it is just not fair.”</p><p>Puckel means “bump” in Swedish, and Ström said bumpy soccer fields better represent the unpredictability of life. The two goals may not be the same size, he said, the field may be asymmetrical, and of course, there’s a lot of bumps.</p><p>No Puckelball field will be the exact same, he said, because he wants each field to be custom-fitted to the environment they’re in.</p><p>“I don’t want the fields to be just another sports field in the neighborhood,” Ström said. “I want them to be something that makes a difference in a community and that creates new opportunities in certain areas.”</p><p>JOTP artist director Ted Kroeten said they approached Ström after they learned about the sport and realized it aligned with their own ideals.</p><p>“You need to play before you can compete,” Kroeten said, “We lost the idea of play.”</p><p>Youth soccer is a multi-billion dollar industry, he said, but people have lost the idea of play because they’re too focused on competition. A lot of kids end up quitting soccer by 18 because of this, he said.</p><p>Puckelball can be soccer on a bumpy field, Ström said, but there really are no rules. Kids can play soccer, climb on the goals, or just dance, he said.</p><p>JOTP tries to reintroduce the joy of free and unstructured play as an alternative to coached and competitive soccer, Kroeten said. “To turn into great players, children have to play the game without being told what to do,” he said.</p><p>Ström said the bumpy fields also even out players’ skills. “It neutralizes individual players’ special skills and talents. In fact, the bumps make it smoother,” he said.</p><p>Separating kids by skill can ruin experiences and even friendships, Ström said, but when people are playing on a Puckelball field everyone can be on the same level. Brazil is so good at soccer because they develop their skills on the streets, rather than in organized sports, he said.</p><p>Ström said two other cities in Europe asked him to build Puckelball fields there, but he decided to do it in St. Paul because he believes his fields can make a difference in communities that need more opportunities. He doesn’t want to build them in places that already have tons of opportunities, he said.</p><p>But Puckelball is more than just a playground or sports arena, he said, they’re also works of art. “The fields are pieces of art, they are sculptures. That’s what I would want them to be seen as.”&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p><em>This story was written by a Twin Cities Daily Planet intern for the TCDP college internship program.&nbsp;This is one of a number of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/interns-and-students">articles produced by student interns</a>&nbsp;at the TC Daily Planet.</em></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The midfielder is moving the ball through the center circle. He’s dribbling past a defender, looks for a teammate, passes the ball and it stops because of a bump in the field, right in front of the eighteen-yard box. Welcome to <a href="http://puckelball.com/info.html">the game of Puckelball</a>.</p><p><!--break--></p><p>The innovative playground-style sport may be making its debut in the United States next year. Local soccer non-profit Joy of the People (JOTP) and Swedish artist and Puckelball inventor Johan Ström are planning on installing one of the bumpy soccer fields in St. Paul as soon as 2015. It will be the third field in the world and the first one outside of Sweden, and would cost around $500,000 to build.</p><p>Ström teamed up with St. Paul nonprofit Joy of the People, who will be paying for the field, and presented their idea to the public on Nov. 18 at Urban Growler brewery.</p><p>“We like to relate sports to life but a normal soccer field does not represent life properly,” Ström said. “Life is not smooth and even, you never know where the ball will bounce. Sometimes it is just not fair.”</p><p>Puckel means “bump” in Swedish, and Ström said bumpy soccer fields better represent the unpredictability of life. The two goals may not be the same size, he said, the field may be asymmetrical, and of course, there’s a lot of bumps.</p><p>No Puckelball field will be the exact same, he said, because he wants each field to be custom-fitted to the environment they’re in.</p><p>“I don’t want the fields to be just another sports field in the neighborhood,” Ström said. “I want them to be something that makes a difference in a community and that creates new opportunities in certain areas.”</p><p>JOTP artist director Ted Kroeten said they approached Ström after they learned about the sport and realized it aligned with their own ideals.</p><p>“You need to play before you can compete,” Kroeten said, “We lost the idea of play.”</p><p>Youth soccer is a multi-billion dollar industry, he said, but people have lost the idea of play because they’re too focused on competition. A lot of kids end up quitting soccer by 18 because of this, he said.</p><p>Puckelball can be soccer on a bumpy field, Ström said, but there really are no rules. Kids can play soccer, climb on the goals, or just dance, he said.</p><p>JOTP tries to reintroduce the joy of free and unstructured play as an alternative to coached and competitive soccer, Kroeten said. “To turn into great players, children have to play the game without being told what to do,” he said.</p><p>Ström said the bumpy fields also even out players’ skills. “It neutralizes individual players’ special skills and talents. In fact, the bumps make it smoother,” he said.</p><p>Separating kids by skill can ruin experiences and even friendships, Ström said, but when people are playing on a Puckelball field everyone can be on the same level. Brazil is so good at soccer because they develop their skills on the streets, rather than in organized sports, he said.</p><p>Ström said two other cities in Europe asked him to build Puckelball fields there, but he decided to do it in St. Paul because he believes his fields can make a difference in communities that need more opportunities. He doesn’t want to build them in places that already have tons of opportunities, he said.</p><p>But Puckelball is more than just a playground or sports arena, he said, they’re also works of art. “The fields are pieces of art, they are sculptures. That’s what I would want them to be seen as.”&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p><em>This story was written by a Twin Cities Daily Planet intern for the TCDP college internship program.&nbsp;This is one of a number of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/interns-and-students">articles produced by student interns</a>&nbsp;at the TC Daily Planet.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Jonas Warlich </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103929"></fb:comments> </div> <ul style="display:none"><li>Broken ankles.... broken ankles everywhere... - by Russell Johnston III on Tue, 11/25/2014 - 8:21am</li><li>It looks like something out of the mind of Dr Seuss! How fun! - by Coni Ann Cassity on Mon, 11/24/2014 - 3:13pm</li><li>Í have seen it once before on TV, Sounds funny and the idea behind is interesting. - by Jürgen Zink on Mon, 11/24/2014 - 2:02pm</li></ul> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/23/what-puck-new-swedish-playground-sport-come-st-paul#comments Puckelball St. Paul Visual Arts Daily Planet Originals Lifestyle Local Minnesota Sports Youth Sun, 23 Nov 2014 20:40:25 +0000 103929 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net OPINION | MN Child Protection League continues its assault on LGBT community http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/20/opinion-mn-child-protection-league-continues-its-assault-lgbt-community <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/20/opinion-mn-child-protection-league-continues-its-assault-lgbt-community" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/20/transpolicy.gif" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Colu.mn </div> </div> </div> <p>The MN Child Protection League Action PAC [CPLActionPAC] issued an action alert to their current followers concerning the Transgender Athletic Policy coming up for a vote on December 4, 2014. They claim that the Minnesota State High School League [MSHSL] is not listening to “you” and have urged their members to call the MSHSL and regurgitate their tired talking points to oppose the policy.<!--break--></p><p>The alert continues to state, “They [children] should not be used as tools of aggressive special interest groups with dangerous agendas that will harm children.” Based on their past lobbying efforts, this appears to be what the CPLActionPAC is, an aggressive special interest group putting our children in harms way, particularly those in the LGBT community.</p><p>On September 26th, 2014 the CPLActionPAC in MN spent approximately $37,000.00 on a full page ad in the Sunday Sports section of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. The headline blared “A male wants to shower beside your 14-year old daughter…Are you OK with that?” and intentionally created a controversial debate in Minnesota concerning transgender student athletes competing in K-12 sports and urged the public to attend the October 1st meeting to oppose the new policy of inclusion.</p><p>Executive Direct, David Stead of the Minnesota State High School League [MSHSL] stated that the current policy draft was constructed borrowing the best practices from the 32 states that have already past a similar policy regarding transgender student athletes. The policy is an inclusive document that basically allows transgender athletes to participate in sports while their privacy is protected. Although the ad was debunked line-by-line, there were 55 people signed up to speak, but due to time constraints, approximately 40 made it to the podium. Packed with more than 150 “concerned citizens”, the CPLAction PAC came well-armed with proxy mouth pieces to oppose the bill and push their anti-transgender agenda.</p><p>This isn’t the first time the CPLAction PAC has been opposed to LGBT student rights under the guise of “protection.” “We’re concerned about protecting children,” said Michele Lentz, the state coordinator for Child Protection League Action on their website. Child Protection League aims to protect all children from “exploitation, indoctrination and violence.” A paradoxical stance considering CPLAction PAC’s past campaign was opposing the Safe Schools Bill.</p><p>HF 826, the Safe Schools Bill, or the “Anti-Bullying Bill” would take Minnesota from having one of the weakest laws on school bullying to a policy on parity with the rest of the country. Governor Dayton’s Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Prevention of Bullying Task Force Report HF 826 was opposed by the CPLAction PAC stating, “This report includes language that opens the door to emotionally damaging, sexually explicit curriculum for all school-age children regarding human sexuality.” The opposition to the law was also met with at 27 minute video and DVD issued by the CPLAction PAC containing explicit cartoon like drawn pictures about sexuality, including images of children in a sexual context.</p><p>“We universally in Minnesota –every one of us– oppose bullying,” said Lentz. “We care about children and we want all children to be protected. Period. But we don’t believe this bill will stop or prevent bullying.” stated Lentz on CBS Minnesota. The CPLAction PAC continues on their website, “Values and attitudes about human sexuality will be transformed by means of “inclusive curriculum (HF 826, line 11.19)” The CPLAction PAC assumes, “When it comes to human sexuality, “inclusive” means normalizing anal sex and presenting it as equivalent to vaginal intercourse.” The lobbying effort was unsuccessful and the bill was signed by Governor Dayton in April of 2014, handing the CPLAction PAC a defeat.</p><p>If the CPLAction PAC seems to have a consistently anti-LGBT agenda, it’s because it is supported by members of Education Liberty Watch and Barb Anderson, head of the Parents Action League [PAL]. PAL has been designated as an LGBT hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center and Barb Anderson has suggested that, “a lot” of gay teens have been sexually abused, which is why they are “sexually confused” and in need of “change.”</p><p>On November 18th of 2013, Anderson addressed the Southwest Metro Tea Party stating, <em>“The transgender movement under the label of gender identity and expression which, is the language in this bill, is sweeping across the nation and into our schools at an accelerated pace. The phrase boys will be boys can now mean boys will be girls. This is warped thinking that defies biology medical facts and common sense. The gender identity and expression is a politically biased, fabricated term. It includes transgender and cross-dressing. The medically correct term is gender identity disorder. Why is there more protection for this one disorder while excluding other disorders like attention deficit disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, anorexia, bulimia, and Asperger’s syndrome — this is just to name a few? And the children in these categories they are more likely to be bullied than the other students.”</em></p><p>At the October 1, 2014 MSHSL meeting, cries from the CPLAction PAC were made that bullying at the schools against transgender students would increase if this policy was passed and “besides, transgender students will be protected from bullying under the Safe Schools Act” [the very bill the CPLAction PAC opposed, they were now standing behind], so the way to reduce transgender violence in public schools was to oppose this policy.</p><p>Full disclosure, as a trans-woman who spoke at the October 1, 2014 MSHSL meeting, I stated <em>“78% of transgender students suffered from harassment at school K-12. In this scenario, who is afraid of whom?” </em> The CPLAction PAC agenda seems to exclude the LGBT student body as well as the Gender Non-Conforming community, but hides behind the mask of “protecting children”.</p><p>The vote taken on October 2, 2014 by the MSHSL was tabled until December 4, 2014. This didn’t necessarily hand the CPLAction PAC a victory, but allowed them to ramp up their efforts to defeat this Trans inclusive policy.</p><p>On November 14, 2014, CPLAction PAC launched an aggressive email, Facebook, Twitter and website campaign reminding their members to attend the December 4th meeting to voice their opinions against the new policy. They once again stated that the policy “creates the potential for children of the opposite sex to <strong>SHOWER WITH EACH OTHER, DRESS WITH EACH OTHER, and SHARE HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS</strong>.” and urges their approximate 1500 Facebook followers to contact the MSHSL Board and speak up to oppose this policy.</p><p>The CPLAction went on to state the following in their recent Anti-LGBT campaign.</p><blockquote><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/cpl.jpg" width="599" height="111" /></p></blockquote><p>This once again perpetuates the “boy in a dress” scare-tactic that CPLAction PAC knows is a trigger point for their followers. I reached out the CPLAction PAC via Facebook asking for some clarification on their stance regarding female-to-male [FTM] student athletes and if they feared that “girls would be showering in the boys locker facilities”. I specifically asked if CPLAction PAC believed that FTM students should not be allowed on boy’s teams if they felt that MTF transgender athletes were banned from girl’s sports. As of yet, they have chosen not to respond.</p><p>CPLAction PAC is unknowingly correct in saying that “Gender is Biology” and proof of this began to appear in 2008 with Australia’s Prince Henry’s Institute Study on the DNA of transgender individuals lead by Dr. Vincent Harley. Previous studies had shown that the brain structures of Male-to-Female transgender individuals were more “female-like,” however the Prince Henry Study took it one step further and pinpointed the cause.</p><p>In this study, the DNA of 112 transgender people were studied against a group of 258 controls and found a longer androgen receptor gene in those who were transgender; this genetic difference resulted in weaker testosterone level in MTF transgender individuals. In an interview with The Telegraph, Professor Vincent Harley stated, <em>“There is a social stigma that transsexualism is simply a lifestyle choice, however our findings support a biological basis of how gender identity develops.” </em></p><p>Since 2008, multiple studies have also shown that an atypical gender identity is triggered by genetics and biology via a defective AR gene. These further studies virtually eliminate the clinical debate of whether being transgender is a “choice” while also discrediting the CPLAction PAC’s talking point that DNA is not involved in gender expression.</p><p>Instead of debunking misinformation and straw-man scenarios and assumptions presented by the CPLAction PAC, Minnesota has already positively and successfully implemented this unwritten policy in the Hopkins School District 270 with Jae Bates. Jae is the Hopkins, MN. graduate who in the 11th grade informed his coaches that he wanted to be addressed as a transgender male. I reached out to Jae to find out what kind of accommodations were offered to make him feel inclusive and safe as a trans athlete, Jae stated,</p><blockquote><p><em>“Hopkins was very accommodating and most accommodations were made by the coaches directly rather than the district. I actually never had a problem that wasn’t immediately addressed that would require going to the district level. My coaches changed my name on all of their rosters and allowed me to compete the way I wanted and encouraged me to keep an open line of communication about if that were to ever change. I was allowed access to gender neutral bathrooms to change if I desired them and they kept the team a very friendly and supportive place.”</em></p></blockquote><p>In other words, the same accommodations suggested by the MSHSL draft policy were already being implemented by the individual school district with no need to elevate the requests to a higher level. In essence, the policy that the CPLAction PAC is so vehemently opposed to has already been put into place at the local level. The MSHSL Policy simply creates a Standard Operating Procedure to be used as a statewide guideline.</p><p>The CPLAction is a registered Political Action Committee [PAC] that runs on a shoe-string budget ending the month of September with just $1360.00 attained mostly through donations from Barb Anderson, Michele Lentz, Julie M. Quist and Douglas Seaton.</p><p>A PAC is a political committee specifically organized for the sole purpose of pooling money and resources to defeat a candidate or to lobby against policy. CPLAction PAC is a registered PAC [reg. #41127] and is required to report their receipts and expenditures to the Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board.</p><p>According to the Board, October total donations reached $4065.00 in cash and in kind, however a $1000.00 donation reported a back date to September 20, [the week the $37,000 full-page ad was run in the Star-Tribune] by Renee T. Doyle. If that name sounds familiar, it’s because Doyle was the founder of the now shuttered Edwatch, an organization similar to CPLAction PAC with a firm anti-LGBT stance. Doyle is currently employed by Rep. Michele Bachmann as a Senior Legislative Assistant and refused to answer my questions related to her donation.</p><p>Finally, as we witness the anti-LGBT propaganda pushed this week by the CPLAction PAC to spread misinformation about the transgender athlete policy proposed by the MSHSL, one question still remains; with a September and October balance not exceeding $4065.00, where did the $37,000.00 come from to run a full page ad in the Star-Tribune on September 28, 2014? It certainly wasn’t reported on the Receipts and Expenditures Report received by the Board on October 24, 2014 and electronically signed by Julie M. Quist.</p><p>Contact the CPLAction PAC [<a href="http://cplaction.com/contact/">http://cplaction.com/contact/</a>] and let them know that Minnesota stands for equality for every student.</p><p><em><strong>Content provided by ClaireOverThere and republished with permission. To read more of Claire-Renee Kohner’s writing, visit <a href="http://clairekohner.wordpress.com">clairekohner.wordpress.com</a>.</strong></em></p><p class="gde-text"><strong><em>Related stories:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102151">Minnesota League tables trans-inclusive policy under mounting opposition</a> (Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/101913">State athletics league mulls transgender inclusion in sports</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li></ul><p><em><strong><br /></strong></em></p><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The MN Child Protection League Action PAC [CPLActionPAC] issued an action alert to their current followers concerning the Transgender Athletic Policy coming up for a vote on December 4, 2014. They claim that the Minnesota State High School League [MSHSL] is not listening to “you” and have urged their members to call the MSHSL and regurgitate their tired talking points to oppose the policy.<!--break--></p><p>The alert continues to state, “They [children] should not be used as tools of aggressive special interest groups with dangerous agendas that will harm children.” Based on their past lobbying efforts, this appears to be what the CPLActionPAC is, an aggressive special interest group putting our children in harms way, particularly those in the LGBT community.</p><p>On September 26th, 2014 the CPLActionPAC in MN spent approximately $37,000.00 on a full page ad in the Sunday Sports section of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. The headline blared “A male wants to shower beside your 14-year old daughter…Are you OK with that?” and intentionally created a controversial debate in Minnesota concerning transgender student athletes competing in K-12 sports and urged the public to attend the October 1st meeting to oppose the new policy of inclusion.</p><p>Executive Direct, David Stead of the Minnesota State High School League [MSHSL] stated that the current policy draft was constructed borrowing the best practices from the 32 states that have already past a similar policy regarding transgender student athletes. The policy is an inclusive document that basically allows transgender athletes to participate in sports while their privacy is protected. Although the ad was debunked line-by-line, there were 55 people signed up to speak, but due to time constraints, approximately 40 made it to the podium. Packed with more than 150 “concerned citizens”, the CPLAction PAC came well-armed with proxy mouth pieces to oppose the bill and push their anti-transgender agenda.</p><p>This isn’t the first time the CPLAction PAC has been opposed to LGBT student rights under the guise of “protection.” “We’re concerned about protecting children,” said Michele Lentz, the state coordinator for Child Protection League Action on their website. Child Protection League aims to protect all children from “exploitation, indoctrination and violence.” A paradoxical stance considering CPLAction PAC’s past campaign was opposing the Safe Schools Bill.</p><p>HF 826, the Safe Schools Bill, or the “Anti-Bullying Bill” would take Minnesota from having one of the weakest laws on school bullying to a policy on parity with the rest of the country. Governor Dayton’s Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Prevention of Bullying Task Force Report HF 826 was opposed by the CPLAction PAC stating, “This report includes language that opens the door to emotionally damaging, sexually explicit curriculum for all school-age children regarding human sexuality.” The opposition to the law was also met with at 27 minute video and DVD issued by the CPLAction PAC containing explicit cartoon like drawn pictures about sexuality, including images of children in a sexual context.</p><p>“We universally in Minnesota –every one of us– oppose bullying,” said Lentz. “We care about children and we want all children to be protected. Period. But we don’t believe this bill will stop or prevent bullying.” stated Lentz on CBS Minnesota. The CPLAction PAC continues on their website, “Values and attitudes about human sexuality will be transformed by means of “inclusive curriculum (HF 826, line 11.19)” The CPLAction PAC assumes, “When it comes to human sexuality, “inclusive” means normalizing anal sex and presenting it as equivalent to vaginal intercourse.” The lobbying effort was unsuccessful and the bill was signed by Governor Dayton in April of 2014, handing the CPLAction PAC a defeat.</p><p>If the CPLAction PAC seems to have a consistently anti-LGBT agenda, it’s because it is supported by members of Education Liberty Watch and Barb Anderson, head of the Parents Action League [PAL]. PAL has been designated as an LGBT hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center and Barb Anderson has suggested that, “a lot” of gay teens have been sexually abused, which is why they are “sexually confused” and in need of “change.”</p><p>On November 18th of 2013, Anderson addressed the Southwest Metro Tea Party stating, <em>“The transgender movement under the label of gender identity and expression which, is the language in this bill, is sweeping across the nation and into our schools at an accelerated pace. The phrase boys will be boys can now mean boys will be girls. This is warped thinking that defies biology medical facts and common sense. The gender identity and expression is a politically biased, fabricated term. It includes transgender and cross-dressing. The medically correct term is gender identity disorder. Why is there more protection for this one disorder while excluding other disorders like attention deficit disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, anorexia, bulimia, and Asperger’s syndrome — this is just to name a few? And the children in these categories they are more likely to be bullied than the other students.”</em></p><p>At the October 1, 2014 MSHSL meeting, cries from the CPLAction PAC were made that bullying at the schools against transgender students would increase if this policy was passed and “besides, transgender students will be protected from bullying under the Safe Schools Act” [the very bill the CPLAction PAC opposed, they were now standing behind], so the way to reduce transgender violence in public schools was to oppose this policy.</p><p>Full disclosure, as a trans-woman who spoke at the October 1, 2014 MSHSL meeting, I stated <em>“78% of transgender students suffered from harassment at school K-12. In this scenario, who is afraid of whom?” </em> The CPLAction PAC agenda seems to exclude the LGBT student body as well as the Gender Non-Conforming community, but hides behind the mask of “protecting children”.</p><p>The vote taken on October 2, 2014 by the MSHSL was tabled until December 4, 2014. This didn’t necessarily hand the CPLAction PAC a victory, but allowed them to ramp up their efforts to defeat this Trans inclusive policy.</p><p>On November 14, 2014, CPLAction PAC launched an aggressive email, Facebook, Twitter and website campaign reminding their members to attend the December 4th meeting to voice their opinions against the new policy. They once again stated that the policy “creates the potential for children of the opposite sex to <strong>SHOWER WITH EACH OTHER, DRESS WITH EACH OTHER, and SHARE HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS</strong>.” and urges their approximate 1500 Facebook followers to contact the MSHSL Board and speak up to oppose this policy.</p><p>The CPLAction went on to state the following in their recent Anti-LGBT campaign.</p><blockquote><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/cpl.jpg" width="599" height="111" /></p></blockquote><p>This once again perpetuates the “boy in a dress” scare-tactic that CPLAction PAC knows is a trigger point for their followers. I reached out the CPLAction PAC via Facebook asking for some clarification on their stance regarding female-to-male [FTM] student athletes and if they feared that “girls would be showering in the boys locker facilities”. I specifically asked if CPLAction PAC believed that FTM students should not be allowed on boy’s teams if they felt that MTF transgender athletes were banned from girl’s sports. As of yet, they have chosen not to respond.</p><p>CPLAction PAC is unknowingly correct in saying that “Gender is Biology” and proof of this began to appear in 2008 with Australia’s Prince Henry’s Institute Study on the DNA of transgender individuals lead by Dr. Vincent Harley. Previous studies had shown that the brain structures of Male-to-Female transgender individuals were more “female-like,” however the Prince Henry Study took it one step further and pinpointed the cause.</p><p>In this study, the DNA of 112 transgender people were studied against a group of 258 controls and found a longer androgen receptor gene in those who were transgender; this genetic difference resulted in weaker testosterone level in MTF transgender individuals. In an interview with The Telegraph, Professor Vincent Harley stated, <em>“There is a social stigma that transsexualism is simply a lifestyle choice, however our findings support a biological basis of how gender identity develops.” </em></p><p>Since 2008, multiple studies have also shown that an atypical gender identity is triggered by genetics and biology via a defective AR gene. These further studies virtually eliminate the clinical debate of whether being transgender is a “choice” while also discrediting the CPLAction PAC’s talking point that DNA is not involved in gender expression.</p><p>Instead of debunking misinformation and straw-man scenarios and assumptions presented by the CPLAction PAC, Minnesota has already positively and successfully implemented this unwritten policy in the Hopkins School District 270 with Jae Bates. Jae is the Hopkins, MN. graduate who in the 11th grade informed his coaches that he wanted to be addressed as a transgender male. I reached out to Jae to find out what kind of accommodations were offered to make him feel inclusive and safe as a trans athlete, Jae stated,</p><blockquote><p><em>“Hopkins was very accommodating and most accommodations were made by the coaches directly rather than the district. I actually never had a problem that wasn’t immediately addressed that would require going to the district level. My coaches changed my name on all of their rosters and allowed me to compete the way I wanted and encouraged me to keep an open line of communication about if that were to ever change. I was allowed access to gender neutral bathrooms to change if I desired them and they kept the team a very friendly and supportive place.”</em></p></blockquote><p>In other words, the same accommodations suggested by the MSHSL draft policy were already being implemented by the individual school district with no need to elevate the requests to a higher level. In essence, the policy that the CPLAction PAC is so vehemently opposed to has already been put into place at the local level. The MSHSL Policy simply creates a Standard Operating Procedure to be used as a statewide guideline.</p><p>The CPLAction is a registered Political Action Committee [PAC] that runs on a shoe-string budget ending the month of September with just $1360.00 attained mostly through donations from Barb Anderson, Michele Lentz, Julie M. Quist and Douglas Seaton.</p><p>A PAC is a political committee specifically organized for the sole purpose of pooling money and resources to defeat a candidate or to lobby against policy. CPLAction PAC is a registered PAC [reg. #41127] and is required to report their receipts and expenditures to the Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board.</p><p>According to the Board, October total donations reached $4065.00 in cash and in kind, however a $1000.00 donation reported a back date to September 20, [the week the $37,000 full-page ad was run in the Star-Tribune] by Renee T. Doyle. If that name sounds familiar, it’s because Doyle was the founder of the now shuttered Edwatch, an organization similar to CPLAction PAC with a firm anti-LGBT stance. Doyle is currently employed by Rep. Michele Bachmann as a Senior Legislative Assistant and refused to answer my questions related to her donation.</p><p>Finally, as we witness the anti-LGBT propaganda pushed this week by the CPLAction PAC to spread misinformation about the transgender athlete policy proposed by the MSHSL, one question still remains; with a September and October balance not exceeding $4065.00, where did the $37,000.00 come from to run a full page ad in the Star-Tribune on September 28, 2014? It certainly wasn’t reported on the Receipts and Expenditures Report received by the Board on October 24, 2014 and electronically signed by Julie M. Quist.</p><p>Contact the CPLAction PAC [<a href="http://cplaction.com/contact/">http://cplaction.com/contact/</a>] and let them know that Minnesota stands for equality for every student.</p><p><em><strong>Content provided by ClaireOverThere and republished with permission. To read more of Claire-Renee Kohner’s writing, visit <a href="http://clairekohner.wordpress.com">clairekohner.wordpress.com</a>.</strong></em></p><p class="gde-text"><strong><em>Related stories:</em></strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/102151">Minnesota League tables trans-inclusive policy under mounting opposition</a> (Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet, 2014)</em></li><li><em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/101913">State athletics league mulls transgender inclusion in sports</a> (Andy Birkey, The Colu.mn, 2014)</em></li></ul><p><em><strong><br /></strong></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Claire-Renee Kohner </div> </div> </div> <div class="fb-social-comments-plugin"> <fb:comments numposts="10" width="630" colorscheme="light" migrated="0" href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103867"></fb:comments> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/20/opinion-mn-child-protection-league-continues-its-assault-lgbt-community#comments Gender/GLBT Minnesota Opinion Sports Youth Policy Thu, 20 Nov 2014 21:55:34 +0000 Claire-Renee Kohner 103867 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net