Bicycling

New bicycle advocacy group aims at students, protected bikeways

Dan Lubben, co-founder of the University's chapter of the Minneapolis Bike Coalition, leads the group down Southeast Oak Street to discuss ways to improve bicycle traffic. Photo byJames Healy

From improving existing bike lanes to giving city officials suggestions on upcoming projects, a new advocacy group at the University of Minnesota is working to address cyclists’ concerns.

MORE »

SPOKES and Cycles for Change to Merge

Open workshop night at Spokes community bike shop.

On January 1, we had a big change: SPOKES (the community bike center just east of the LRT on 22nd Street) merged with Cycles for Change, a community bike center headquartered in St. Paul.

MORE »

The more cyclists, the better; West Bank nonprofit gives locals a chance at bicycling

Earn-a-Bike student Wondey Geta observes as mechanic Ben Swanson demonstrates how to remove a bike tube at SPOKES on Saturday morning. Photo by James Healy, via the Minnesota Daily.

After a month of studying and repairing bicycles, two people will ride away from a small shop near the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood on free bikes.

MORE »

The Hennepin County 2040 Bike Plan: Cassie's notes

Late this fall Hennepin County put out a draft of its new 2040 Bicycle Plan for public review and comment. This long-range vision and planning document piqued my interest but, oof, the thing is 116 pages long! Not the easiest to tackle in terms of length, especially for bike-loving-yet-busy folks who might not have time to comb through it. In true librarian form, I decided to read the plan through and compile a sort of Cassie’s Notes version (who’s that Cliff guy, anyway?) to hopefully provide easier access to the information for more folks. This post gives a (relatively) short overview of the vision, goals, strategies, and actions of the Hennepin County 2040 Bike Plan.

MORE »

Minneapolis is hitting the trifecta

If you’re a millennial and you’re looking for a job in a new city, you might have read (or want to read) the November 19th article in The Atlantic about “why it’s so hard for millenials to find a place to live and work”. The problem, it seems, is that the cities with the most upward mobility and the highest median incomes are also the cities with the least affordable housing.

MORE »

MN GOP beware: Biking and pedestrian improvements have broad appeal

Minnesota Republicans captured control of the Minnesota House of Representatives in part by fueling urban versus rural resentment: “Those metro-centric DFLers give everything to Minneapolis and St. Paul.” The truth is, turnout trends associated with non-presidential year elections were a much bigger reason why the DFL lost control of the Minnesota House.

MORE »

Suggestions for a safer Jefferson Bicycle Boulevard

Here is my open letter to Saint Paul Public Works and Mayor Coleman.

MORE »

Neighbors and buses sideswipe 36th Street Bikeway project

(Photo by Tony Randgaard) The new bikeway east of Lake Calhoun on 36th Street in Minneapolis is separated from the rest of the road by bollards.

For bikers and motorists merging on to the new and improved West 36th Street in Minneapolis the view may be a Tale of Two Cities. For bikers, the best of times and excitement over a separate, partitioned 10 foot wide expressway; for motorists relegated to the other half of the roadway, "Wow, the new repainted traffic lanes look awfully narrow?" Minneapolis recently completed construction of the model 36th Street West Bikeway Project, which converted half of the street into a protected bikeway and pedestrian corridor.

MORE »

The case of the missing Lyndale bike connection

On the outskirts of many large, expensive, complicated public works projects, there are often examples of easy little things we could do to improve our cities for very little money. A couple blocks from my humble apartment, the City of Minneapolis is moving ahead with a rebuild of the Hennepin/Lyndale bottleneck that looks to be a real improvementfor pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users. Just south of that, though, is another thing we ought to do something about.

MORE »
Syndicate content