OUR STORIES | Nancy Ford: Standing against panhandlers, counting some as friends

Print

3 thoughts on “OUR STORIES | Nancy Ford: Standing against panhandlers, counting some as friends

  1. As people, we choose or not choose to give to or acknowledge panhandlers – we have our reasons when we do and we have our reasons when we don’t.  I think that we are all generally intellegant enough to determine whether or not we want to do so without someone standing around “protesting” panhandling.  But we all have our causes, so I guess it is what it is.  I am well aware of how frustrating things in ones neighborhood can start to get, I deal with drug dealers, prostitutes and pimps in front of my house, waking me up nightly at 2 or 3 am on a daily basis but to me personally, panhandling pales in comparison.  It’s pretty much a victimless activity unless someone is agressively panhandling which means that they are intimidating or threatening someone into giving them money.  We choose to roll our window down or to engage in speaking with someone. 

     

    What I’ve learned from working in Human Services is that it’s easier not to try to determine whether or not someone truly *needs* the thing that you are offering them if you are doing it from the heart.  There is almost always more to the story, even for the people that are using the money for things other than food or shelter.  It may be generational poverty, domestic or sexual violence, mental health or brain injury concerns that keep persons from working, long term chemical health concerns.  There is no easy solution.

  2. We choose or not choose to give to and/or acknowledge panhandlers – we have our reasons when we do and we have our reasons when we don’t.  I think that we are all generally intellegant enough to determine whether or not we want to do so without someone standing around “protesting” panhandling.  But we all have our causes, so I guess it is what it is.  I am well aware of how frustrating things in ones neighborhood can start to get, I deal with drug dealers, prostitutes and pimps in front of my house, waking me up nightly at 2 or 3 am on a daily basis but to me personally, panhandling pales in comparison.  It’s pretty much a victimless activity unless someone is agressively panhandling which means that they are intimidating or threatening someone into giving them money.  We choose to roll our window down or to engage in speaking with someone. 

     

    What I’ve learned from working in Human Services is that it’s easier not to try to determine whether or not someone truly *needs* the thing that you are offering them if you are doing it from the heart.  If you believe they are in need, then go for it.  If you feel that there might be other motivations, choose not to and don’t feel guilty. 

    There is almost always more to the story, even for the people that are using the money for things other than food or shelter.  It may be generational poverty, domestic or sexual violence, mental health or brain injury concerns that keep persons from working, long term chemical health concerns.  Unfortunately, there is no easy solution to homelessness, poverty and addiction – people lead their own lives and as much as we try to help or to fight their decisions, it is what it is.

  3. We choose or not choose to give to and/or acknowledge panhandlers – we have our reasons when we do and we have our reasons when we don’t. I think that we are all generally intellegant enough to determine whether or not we want to do so without someone standing around “protesting” panhandling. But we all have our causes, so I guess it is what it is. I am well aware of how frustrating things in ones neighborhood can start to get, I deal with drug dealers, prostitutes and pimps in front of my house, waking me up nightly at 2 or 3 am on a daily basis but to me personally, panhandling pales in comparison. It’s pretty much a victimless activity unless someone is agressively panhandling which means that they are intimidating or threatening someone into giving them money. We choose to roll our window down or to engage in speaking with someone. What I’ve learned from working in Human Services is that it’s easier not to try to determine whether or not someone truly *needs* the thing that you are offering them if you are doing it from the heart. If you believe they are in need, then go for it. If you feel that there might be other motivations, choose not to and don’t feel guilty. There is almost always more to the story, even for the people that are using the money for things other than food or shelter. It may be generational poverty, domestic or sexual violence, mental health or brain injury concerns that keep persons from working, long term chemical health concerns. Unfortunately, there is no easy solution to homelessness, poverty and addiction – people lead their own lives and as much as we try to help or to fight their decisions, it is what it is.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>