My DIY sufganiyot crawl

Running a Jewish preschool is fun. It often inspires me to take on fun projects. For example, one of my staff was looking at resources for Hanukkah and said “Wait, what do donuts have to do with Hanukkah?”

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Hebrew National lawsuit ends

A lawsuit alleging that Hebrew National hot dogs were not made from “100% kosher beef” as advertised has come to an end.

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Muddy Paws entrepreneur tastes sweet success

The wish for every entrepreneur is to take what he or she does best, turn it into a business, turn a profit and maybe even get noticed.

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A tale of three Reubens

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The Reuben. By nearly all accounts, the crown jewel of the sandwich universe. Legend has it that Archimedes, having slipped into that fateful bathtub, took the first bite of a corned beef, Swiss cheese, and sauerkraut on Marble Rye1 and proclaimed, “Eureka!” which roughly translates to, “What a sandwich!” Later that evening, he dipped the second half of his invention into a bowl of Thousand Island dressing, which spilled over the edge, thus discovering the displacement of volume. History has muddled the details, but the Reuben has been central to our culinary consciousness ever since.

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Homegrown Minneapolis hands out "Heroes" awards

Winners of the “Homegrown Heroes” awards for 2014

“Unity will come to local farming, and prosperity will come to the local economy” Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said in her remarks at the Third Annual Homegrown Minneapolis Open House last Wednesday. The mayor added that “the thoughtfulness and consideration of all of you here helps make sure that everyone can do better, now and in the future.”

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Perfect pies at Comstock family's 2014 pie baking contest

(Park Bugle photo by Marina Lang) Twenty-three pies—13 sanctioned and 10 unsanctioned—were entered in the Comstock family’s 2014 pie baking contest. The pies ranged from sweet to savory and traditional to original.

The 23 pies lined up in two straight rows on the front table at Claddagh Coffee & Café on West Seventh Street, St. Paul, had names as alluring as the pies themselves:

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Lefse day!

We began as a hodgepodge of lefse-loving Minnesotas with Lutheran-church-basement-ladies-envy who wanted to learn the art of potato flatbread. Through the years we've each developed an important role in the day, contributing our skills to the balling, rolling, lifting, and griddling. Those skills have progressed and we are now Masters. This is our 7th year together, and we are an awesome, dangerous, motley crew of self-taught lefse makers.

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Globäl Gröceries | Chef Marcus Samuelsson shares his secret lutefisk recipe

(Photo by Stephanie Fox) Left; photo of Marcus Samuelsson courtesy of himself. Right; lutefisk in all its glory.

The obligatory bite of lutefisk at a Winter Solstice/Christmas celebration is one of two yearly traditions for thousands of Scandinavian Americans. The other is to complain about having to eat it.

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Boring public a culprit in loss of treasured businesses

Last week, the owners of Nye’s Polonaise Room announced that the beloved Northeast Minneapolis bar would be closing next year to make way for a residential tower of some sort. It’s pretty sketchy what that will ultimately entail, but quotes from the developer indicate that the existing building will need to be demolished to make a tower work on the site, which is pretty small. It’s worth pointing out that, by now, you’d hope that smart developers know to start out with something crazy to then negotiate down to what they actually want to do. Also, the developer in question lost the nearby/huge Pillsbury “A” Mill complex to foreclosure after proposing an ambitious redevelopment plan about five years ago, so who knows, anything is possible in real estate. In any case, it seems like the bar & restaurant itself will be closing. The owners say they can’t make Nye’s work as a business anymore, but of course you’d want to take that statement with a pretty big grain of salt.

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