Twin Cities Daily Planet | Latest Headlines http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/columnists en Twin Cities Hmong community seeks help in closing achievement gap http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/twin-cities-hmong-community-seeks-help-closing-achievement-gap <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/30/twin-cities-hmong-community-seeks-help-closing-achievement-gap" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/032615-photo-asian_children_program-av.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Session Daily </div> </div> </div> <div id="_p1" class="_storyDiv"><p>Advocates from Minnesota’s Hmong community want to ensure their children are not left behind as legislators continue to tackle the state’s well-publicized achievemen</p></div><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/30/twin-cities-hmong-community-seeks-help-closing-achievement-gap"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div id="_p1" class="_storyDiv"><p>Advocates from Minnesota’s Hmong community want to ensure their children are not left behind as legislators continue to tackle the state’s well-publicized achievement gap.</p></div><div id="_p3" class="_storyDiv"><p><a href="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/bills/billnum.asp?Billnumber=HF1930&amp;ls_year=89&amp;session_year=2015&amp;session_number=0" title="Information for HF1930" id="sticky1" rel="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/bills/billvnum.asp?Billnumber=HF1930&amp;ls_year=89&amp;session_year=2015&amp;session_number=0">HF1930</a>, sponsored by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/members/membersR.asp?id=Rep_Rod_Hamilton">Rep. Rod Hamilton</a>&nbsp;(R-Mountain Lake), would provide funding for the Department of Education to create outreach programs that help Southeast Asian immigrant and refugee families better access early childhood care and education resources, developmental screening and early reading assessments.</p></div><div id="_p4" class="_storyDiv"><p>The House Education Innovation Policy Committee approved the bill Thursday and sent it to the House Education Finance Committee. Its companion,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/bills/billnum.asp?Billnumber=SF1781&amp;ls_year=89&amp;session_year=2015&amp;session_number=0" title="Information for SF1781" id="sticky2" rel="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/bills/billvnum.asp?Billnumber=SF1781&amp;ls_year=89&amp;session_year=2015&amp;session_number=0">SF1781</a>, sponsored by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/members/membersR.asp?id=Sen_Sandy_Pappas">Senate President Sandy Pappas</a>&nbsp;(DFL-St. Paul), has been laid over by the Senate E-12 Budget Division for possible omnibus bill inclusion.</p></div><div id="_p5" class="_storyDiv"><p>Recent research conducted by the Twin Cities-based Hmong National Development, Inc. indicates that Hmong students in early education score two standard deviations below the national average on reading assessments. That gap follows these students when they transition to K-12 education, said Zha Blong Xiong, a professor of college education and human development at the University of Minnesota.</p></div><div id="_p6" class="_storyDiv"><p>About half of Hmong students in the Twin Cities are considered proficient in MCA reading exams, Xiong told lawmakers. Many of these students would have qualified for programs like early learning scholarships, but their parents aren’t aware of the opportunities, he said.</p></div><div id="_p7" class="_storyDiv"><p>“We believe that family engagement efforts are needed to ensure the hardest to reach populations, like Southeast Asian population, are gaining access to these wonderful early child education resources to close the achievement gap.”</p></div><div id="_p8" class="_storyDiv"><p>Sinying Lee is a working mother to three young children, two of whom attend a St. Paul preschool on early learning scholarships awarded through the Department of Education.</p></div><div id="_p9" class="_storyDiv"><p>Lee said she represents a growing demographic in the Twin Cities Hmong community, where many are first generation-born Minnesotans who have started families, but struggle to access available resources to ensure their children are kindergarten ready.</p></div><div id="_p10" class="_storyDiv"><p>Currently, 43 percent of the Hmong population in the Twin Cities is under 18, but only 14 percent of Hmong adults living in Minnesota have obtained a higher education degree, said Bao Vang, president of the St. Paul-based Hmong American Partnership.</p></div><div id="_p11" class="_storyDiv"><p>“Creating a new support system of outreach that could get those parents access to available resources would help close the achievement gap for a community whose academic success is vital to the future of Minnesota,” Vang said.</p><p><em>[See original post here: <a href="http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/sessiondaily/SDView.aspx?StoryID=5672">http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/sessiondaily/SDView.aspx?StoryID=5672</a>]</em></p></div> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/twin-cities-hmong-community-seeks-help-closing-achievement-gap#comments education Hmong state legislature Education Downtown Immigrants Minnesota News in Hmong Race/Ethnicity Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:59:01 +0000 Hank Long 107247 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Residents of East Phillips want less industrialization, more green jobs and space for the community. http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/residents-east-phillips-want-less-industrialization-more-green-jobs-and-space-commun <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/30/residents-east-phillips-want-less-industrialization-more-green-jobs-and-space-commun" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/screen_shot_2015-03-30_at_10.47.30_am.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>MINNEAPOLIS: In January, 2015, The City of Minneapolis inquired on a plot of land located between The City Hiawatha Public Works facility and Smith Foundry in the South Minneapolis neighborhood of </p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/30/residents-east-phillips-want-less-industrialization-more-green-jobs-and-space-commun"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>MINNEAPOLIS: In January, 2015, The City of Minneapolis inquired on a plot of land located between The City Hiawatha Public Works facility and Smith Foundry in the South Minneapolis neighborhood of East Phillips. It’s owned by Roof Depot Inc., a company which manufactures shingles and other residential and commercial roofing materials, as well as a private month-to-month storage facility for residential use in a warehouse layout.It’s being vetted by the City of Minneapolis for development as a water yard and road maintenance facility for everything from fixing potholes to fire hydrants all across the city, repositioning 90 employees and their maintenance vehicles to the neighborhood.The asking price? Seven million dollars.</p><p>Thats where José Luis Villaseñor and the East Phillips Environmental Justice Committee comes in. They said they have had enough.</p><p>José Luis is the Executive Director of Tamales y Bicicletas, an organization that works to raise awareness about the Indigenous cultural roots, underlying in many of today’s “green” efforts.</p><p>Tamales y Bicicletas were joined by nearly 75 other community members, city officials, and council members at the East Phillips Community Center to compare notes and ideas as to how to approach yet another industrial plan in their already overburdened neighborhood.</p><p>At the meeting, the city laid out their intended use of the site, and community members voiced their opinions on what could be done with the land as an alternative. While its still early in the planning phase, Jose Luis and the EPEJC isn’t wasting any time coming up with possible solutions.</p><p>“Our vision is what happened here today. How can we get community voice and power to address an issue around health and stopping industrialization of our communities. At this point we are putting everything on the table. &nbsp;If anything, I would argue the community is saying we don’t want any more industrialization here in East Phillips” said Jose Luis.</p><p><strong>What’s the need and why East Phillips?</strong></p><p>It has been classically known in the last 150 years as a magnet for industrial work and blue collar jobs as it sits conveniently located just south of downtown Minneapolis between State Highway’s 65 and 55 with easy access to railways and interstates. In 1879, the construction of the Milwaukee Road Railroad, part of which still exists in the neighborhood today as the Minnesota Commercial Railway, brought increased industrial traffic to the area.</p><p>East Phillips is already home to a foundry, an asphalt plant, a hot tar storage facility owned by a roofing company, and an asphalt hot-mix storage site for the City of Minneapolis Public Works Department. East Phillips is also the site of a Federal Pollution Super-Fund facility (called the arsenic triangle) and it continues to feel the effects from severe lead contamination as a result of leaded gasoline and lead paint in its aging housing stock. These factors have lead to one of Minnesota's worst air quality and pollution indexes for a neighborhood, including higher than normal readings of Benzene and human carcinogen, which may cause Leukemia with long term exposure.</p><p>According to Greg Goeke, Director of Property Services for the City of Minneapolis Finance &amp; Property Services Department, the facilities current site on East Hennepin was built in 1898 and is to be repurposed as a fire station to better serve the industrial needs of that part of the city and improve response times in emergency situations.</p><p>Moving locations would also save the City money in repurposing the 19th century structure into energy-efficient, up to date buildings.</p><p>The site would also benefit the City by continuing an initiative to better centralize the water Works department, allowing for less drive time and increased efficiency, reportedly saving the City 57,000 miles in driving according to preliminary traffic reports.</p><p>“We are not in the business of taking properties that people don’t want to sell, and we don’t like to use eminent domain. So with a willing seller, that is a helpful thing” said Goeke</p><p>Members of East Phillips Environmental Justice Committee have other ideas for the land in question. They would like to see an eco-friendly job center, urban agriculture institution educating youth on urban farming and sustainability, youth led bike shop focusing on the Midtown Greenway, hydroponics, (growing plants and fish to sell to local businesses) and a Solar farm to subsidize local energy.</p><p>Closely nuzzled near large warehouse spaces and workyards, sits urban residential housing, schools, and local businesses without so much as a sound wall put in place, and thats where the problem lies according to Sammie Ardito-Rivera, a community activist specializing in the industrialization of low-income communities of color. The neighborhood of East Phillips is home to nearly five thousand Minneapolis residents, many being communities of color.</p><p>Ardito-Rivera believes that any more additions to the East Phillips industrial burden, should be avoided.</p><p>“I think what it is, is more who bears the disproportionate burden of the industrial age that we live in. Communities of color and low income are bearing the brunt of this industrial age and East Phillips is one of those communities” said Ardito-Rivera.</p><p>“The people of this community are asking: Instead of having one more thing that’s not really directly benefiting our community, why can’t we co-create something, the City and the community, that benefits both and also comes from the ideas and the passions of the people that live in this neighborhood” Ardito Rivera added.</p><p>The question that lingered through that event and the events that followed is: Are the two sides willing to compromise.</p><p>According to Goeke, the answer is yes.</p><p>“The current needs of the water department would use about 50% of the property. We don’t have the funding lined up to completely redevelop for the other 50% of the property, so we have some ideas for uses of the warehouse space, which would allow us to save money in renting storage property. Part of the property could be used for other purposes. So we have a laundry list of things that could be used for the city and we heard a lot of ideas that could be used for the community. All possibilities at this point” said Goeke.</p><p>“We have done our first cut of estimated vehicle emissions, the building we would build on the site, or refurbish the current one, will be more energy efficient then it sits today. That’s what the City does-we are a responsible builder. Our current phase one building on Hiawatha is &nbsp;the first leed platinum building for a Public Works department in the world, so we will be responsible with whatever we do on the property if the city decides to pursue acquisition. And if we don’t do it at the Roof Depot location we will do it somewhere else and be responsible there as well” said Goeke.</p><p>But those words didn’t satisfy the people of East Phillips, as they took to their phones, computers, and social media devices to get word out on this issue as the City Water</p><p>Department was set to vote on acquiring this space.</p><p>They bombarded City Council members responsible for the East Phillips area with calls and emails, screaming for a stop to the purchase of the Rood Depot location.</p><p>Those calls seemed to work as the acquisition was put to a halt until after the council’s Spring Break.</p><p>Luke Moe can be reached at <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">Lukemoe85</span> [at] <span class="d">gmail [dot] com</span></span></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/residents-east-phillips-want-less-industrialization-more-green-jobs-and-space-commun#comments Daily Planet Originals Environment Health Immigrants East Phillips Neighborhoods Work & Economy Youth Policy Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:46:32 +0000 Luke Moe 107246 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net 7th Annual Augsburg Powwow http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/7th-annual-augsburg-powwow <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/30/7th-annual-augsburg-powwow" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/9_powwow.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jennifer-larson" title="View user profile.">Jennifer Larson</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>Augsburg College held its 7th annual traditional powwow on Saturday, March 28 in the Si Melby Gymnasium on campus in Minneapolis.</p> <span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/30/7th-annual-augsburg-powwow"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Augsburg College held its 7th annual traditional powwow on Saturday, March 28 in the Si Melby Gymnasium on campus in Minneapolis. The event was hosted by the Augusburg American Indian Student Association and American Indian Student Services.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/7th-annual-augsburg-powwow#comments Augsburg Pow wow Native American dancers Arts Daily Planet Originals Lifestyle Local Neighborhoods Race/Ethnicity Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:41:08 +0000 107245 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net We expect better from the StarTribune http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/we-expect-better-startribune <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/30/we-expect-better-startribune" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/strib_logo.gif" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Insight News </div> </div> </div> <p><span>The StarTribune article on March 18, “Nonprofit paid to help with minority hiring at stadium short of goal…Workforce Is Diverse, But No Thanks to Nonprofit That Was Hired to Help”, totally mi</span></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/30/we-expect-better-startribune"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>The StarTribune article on March 18, “Nonprofit paid to help with minority hiring at stadium short of goal…Workforce Is Diverse, But No Thanks to Nonprofit That Was Hired to Help”, totally missed the mark. We expect better of the StarTribune. This story was far beneath the standards we expect from a major newspaper in a growing and diverse community.&nbsp;</span><span></span><br /><span>It is no secret that Minnesota has the worst racial disparities on most socioeconomic indicators in the nation. The success of minority employment hiring on the Viking Stadium construction could have far-reaching implications for the economic well-being of our community as a whole. This begs the question of why the success of the Viking’s Stadium, which is exceeding all its workforce and business development goals for people of color, is not being trumpeted.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>Rather than applauding and understanding this unprecedented accomplishment, the StarTribune squandered this opportunity to educate its readers concerning employment disparities in our cities.&nbsp; Instead, it chose to unfairly castigate a well-respected African-American led legacy institution – Summit Academy Opportunities Industrialization Center (SAOIC) and its African-American leader Louis King.</span><br /><br /><span>King, like many others, may have underestimated the actual effectiveness of Mortenson Construction, THOR Construction, subcontractors, the MSFA equity program and the trade unions; and therefore overestimated the actual needs on the project. If this is the extent of the wrongdoing or the offense, then all parties involved should be painted with the same brush, not just one person and one organization.&nbsp; King was singled out even though, according to the article, SAOIC was part of a “coalition” of 14 organizations and colleges.</span><br /><br /><span>SAOIC was not alone in its concern that the minority workforce participation goals would be difficult to obtain. Initially many questioned whether it was feasible to meet the new State of Minnesota’s 32% minority workforce participation goal. It had never been done before on such a massive scale as the Viking Stadium. The StarTribune’s recent headlines are replete with stories of publicly supported construction projects that have failed to meet even lower minority workforce goals.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>Therefore, it was prudent for the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority to support an innovative collaboration of organizations to provide additional workers of color if the need arose. MSFA did this by creating a pay-for-performance contracting mechanism that ensured that no resources would be allocated unless actual workers were trained and placed on the construction site.</span><br /><br /><span>Contrary to the title and tenor of the article, there was no wrongdoing, no malfeasance, and no scandal committed by King or SAOIC. No public money was squandered. In fact, there was no suggestion in the article that SAOIC had not met its contractual obligations to the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority or anyone else. Yet, the story was front page news.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>With just a little research, the newspaper would have uncovered that SAOIC and its coalition partners have provided training to thousands of low income people in a variety of fields. These jobs change people’s lives. They become taxpaying citizens who contribute to all of our well-being and enhance our community.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>The African-American community is diverse, with multiple perspectives on any given subject. To rely on one source to represent our many perspectives is neither fair nor objective. Fairness demands that multiple points of view be provided on any given story. Otherwise, the story becomes more of an editorial opinion than objective journalism.</span><br /><br /><span>We seek balance and fairness when we read your newspaper. We expect nothing more, or nothing less. In this case the StarTribune fell way below this key standard.</span><br /><br /><span>Gary L. Cunningham, President &amp; CEO&nbsp;</span><br /><span>Metropolitan Economic Development Association</span><br /><br /><span>Jeffery A. Hassan, Executive Director&nbsp;</span><br /><span>African American Leadership Forum</span><br /><br /><span>Ravi Norman, CEO</span><br /><span>Thor Construction</span><br /><br /><span>Toni Carter</span><br /><span>Commissioner - Dist. 4</span><br /><span>Ramsey County</span></p><p><em>[See original article here:&nbsp;<a href="http://insightnews.com/commentary/13394-we-expect-better-from-the-startribune">http://insightnews.com/commentary/13394-we-expect-better-from-the-startribune</a>]</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/we-expect-better-startribune#comments jobs Media media race Star Tribune summit academy Downtown Minnesota Opinion Race/Ethnicity Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:23:03 +0000 Gary L. Cunningham, Jeffrey A. Hassan, Ravi Norman, and Toni Carter 107244 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Who's got a ticket to ride on private Zip Rail? http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/whos-got-ticket-ride-private-zip-rail <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/30/whos-got-ticket-ride-private-zip-rail" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/zip_rail.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/sally-jo-sorensen" title="View user profile.">Sally Jo Sorensen</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bluestem Prairie </div> </div> </div> <p>While a private entity calling itself the North American High Speed Rail Group LLC has declared itself the private organization that's going to raise capital and build the Zip Rail, a nonstop high </p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/30/whos-got-ticket-ride-private-zip-rail"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While a private entity calling itself the North American High Speed Rail Group LLC has declared itself the private organization that's going to raise capital and build the Zip Rail, a nonstop high speed rail line between the Twin Cities and Rochester, the group has been reluctant to share much about its corporate structure or backers.</p><p>In an email exchange with Bluestem Prairie, the group's Chief Strategy Officer Wendy Meadley declined to share information via email about the group's corporate structure, the CEO's bio, and the group's plan to elevate the Zip Rail tracks to accommodate agriculture.&nbsp; "At this time we are not publicly displaying the type of information you are requesting, but we are happy to respond," Meadley wrote.</p><p>We've done a bit of research, hoping to learn more. This is what we've come across so far.</p><p><strong>CEO: Joe Sperber</strong></p><p>The Rochester Post Bulletin's Heather Carlson reported in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.postbulletin.com/news/politics/long-road-ahead-for-private-rail-developer/article_50c1d5a8-c6f3-5c6f-8219-c691b543c5cf.html" target="_self">Long road ahead for private rail developer</a>:</p><blockquote><p>During an interview after the meeting, North American's CEO and president, Joe Sperber, said the company believes it can do something that has never been done in the United States before —privately build and operate a high-speed rail system. The key to making the plan a success is that it would not rely simply on the rail. Instead, Sperber said the project would including economic development tied into the project.</p></blockquote><p>Who is Joe Sperber?&nbsp; He appears to be a resident of Stillwater who was CEO of HexFuel.&nbsp; Finance and Commerce reported in&nbsp;<a href="http://finance-commerce.com/2014/04/hexfuel-gets-state-grant-for-hastings-facility/" target="_self">HexFuel gets state grant for Hastings facility</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Maplewood-based startup HexFuel is getting a $740,000 grant from the Minnesota Job Creation Fund to help with a new manufacturing facility in Hastings that is expected to employ 150 people within three years, according to a Department of Employment and Economic Development news release.</p><p>HexFuel makes a device that can be installed on diesel engines to make them more efficient. The BoostBox H2 breaks down water into hydrogen and oxygen and uses the gases to improve combustion, which increases fuel efficiency, reduces emissions and enhances performance.</p><p>The company is investing $10 million to open a plant for manufacturing the devices. The company will buy and remodel a 35,000-square-foot building at 1101 Spiral Blvd. in Hastings Business Park, just east of the Minnesota 316 and U.S. 61 intersection. The 6.75-acre property is a former UBC ProBuild Lumber site that has been vacant for two to three years, said John Hinzman, Hastings’ community development director.</p><p>HexFuel, whose leadership is in Minnesota, now has 12 full-time employees and 10 contractors at a Utah manufacturing facility that it will retain. Company President Joseph Sperber said Minnesota was selected for the manufacturing facility because it’s centrally located and has a healthy ecological technology industry for the Midwest. Sperber lives in Stillwater and CEO David E. Ault lives in Arden Hills.</p><p>The company aims for the plant to produce 3,000 to 5,000 units in its initial year and 50,000 to 60,000 units within five years, Sperber said. UPS is already testing the devices, and FedEx has inquired. “We’re looking forward to great things, and it’s exciting to work close to home,” he said. . . . .</p></blockquote><p>Unfortunately, the company was not able to secure the Hastings property. In November 2014, the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal reported in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/blog/real_estate/2014/11/state-cancels-hexfuel-job-subsidy-over-delay.html?page=all" target="_self">State cancels HexFuel job subsidy over delay; company eyes Minneapolis instead of Hastings</a>:</p><p>A company that&nbsp;<a href="https://securepubads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/adview?ai=BNKREZ9wYVbP4MOKAwgHer4HIDLGg3bUGAAAAEAEgqZbaHzgAWJGAnKzyAWDJrtOJlKSYE7IBE3d3dy5iaXpqb3VybmFscy5jb226AQlnZnBfaW1hZ2XIAQnaAXlodHRwOi8vd3d3LmJpempvdXJuYWxzLmNvbS90d2luY2l0aWVzL2Jsb2cvcmVhbF9lc3RhdGUvMjAxNC8xMS9zdGF0ZS1jYW5jZWxzLWhleGZ1ZWwtam9iLXN1YnNpZHktb3Zlci1kZWxheS5odG1sP3BhZ2U9YWxsmAKvdsACAuACAOoCGC80NjM1L2J6ai50d2luY2l0aWVzL29vcPgC_9EekAOkA5gD4AOoAwHgBAGSBQsIBxABGAEgseChGZIFCwgHEAEYASCJx6EZkgULCAcQARgBIJmd6higBiDYBwA&amp;sigh=A54O2tJyTC4&amp;adurl=https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/pagead/imgad?id=CICAgKDju7mkYRABGAEyCOKmgrLbgQP6%26t%3D10%26cT%3Dhttp%253A//bizjournals.com%26l%3Dhttp%253A//www.bizjournals.com/twincities/blog/real_estate/2014/02/manufacturer-may-expand-in-hastings.html%253Fpage%253Dall">promised 150 to 300 jobs for the city of Hastings</a>&nbsp;has scrubbed its plans for that city and lost a $740,000 grant announced in April from the&nbsp;<a href="https://securepubads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/adview?ai=BNKREZ9wYVbP4MOKAwgHer4HIDLGg3bUGAAAAEAEgqZbaHzgAWJGAnKzyAWDJrtOJlKSYE7IBE3d3dy5iaXpqb3VybmFscy5jb226AQlnZnBfaW1hZ2XIAQnaAXlodHRwOi8vd3d3LmJpempvdXJuYWxzLmNvbS90d2luY2l0aWVzL2Jsb2cvcmVhbF9lc3RhdGUvMjAxNC8xMS9zdGF0ZS1jYW5jZWxzLWhleGZ1ZWwtam9iLXN1YnNpZHktb3Zlci1kZWxheS5odG1sP3BhZ2U9YWxsmAKvdsACAuACAOoCGC80NjM1L2J6ai50d2luY2l0aWVzL29vcPgC_9EekAOkA5gD4AOoAwHgBAGSBQsIBxABGAEgseChGZIFCwgHEAEYASCJx6EZkgULCAcQARgBIJmd6higBiDYBwA&amp;sigh=A54O2tJyTC4&amp;adurl=https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/pagead/imgad?id=CICAgKDju7mkYRABGAEyCOKmgrLbgQP6%26t%3D10%26cT%3Dhttp%253A//bizjournals.com%26l%3Dhttp%253A//www.bizjournals.com/profiles/company/us/mn/saint_paul/minnesota_department_of_employment_and_economic_development/3329089">Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development</a>.</p><blockquote><p>Hexfuel, described "as a Maplewood startup"&nbsp;<a href="http://mn.gov/governor/newsroom/pressreleasedetail.jsp?id=102-124507">in the April press release from Gov. Mark Dayton's office</a>, didn't break ground on the $10 million factory it planned in Hastings within the required six month period, so the state rescinded its Minnesota Job Creation Fund award, according to a DEED memo obtained by the&nbsp;<em>Business Journal</em>. . . .</p><p>Hexfuel is in the middle of a two-state legal battle with a group of three senior company officers. There's a lawsuit in Colorado against Hexfuel by three men who were former officers. Hexfuel filed its own suit against the men and some related entities this spring, alleging that the men left Hexfuel and started a company in Denver that's in direct competition. The Ramsey County suit seeks unspecified damages. The hexfuel.com website is also involved in the dispute and for now, is not operational.</p></blockquote><p>The Ramsey County case is still active, according to court records.</p><p><strong>The Mysterious Shrinking Advisory Board</strong></p><p>Via the&nbsp;<a href="http://urbanmsp.com/viewtopic.php?f=18&amp;t=81&amp;start=200" target="_self">streets.mn Forum</a>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20150217183807/http://nahsr.com/who-is-nahsr/" target="_self">Internet Wayback Machine</a>, it's possible to see an advisory board that was posted at the NAHSR webpage on<a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20150217183807/http://nahsr.com/who-is-nahsr/" target="_self">&nbsp;February 17, 2015</a>.</p><p>Of the names listed in February, only those of Board Chair Bill Goins and Social Strategy Director Wendy Meadley remain, but the others--<strong>who may or may not remain on the advisory board</strong>--are fairly high profile figures in Minnesota's transportation and project development spheres. Who was on the deleted list? Let's review.</p><p>However, readers should use caution in citing this group of individuals as proof of motive and chicanery. The content was removed.</p><div><p><strong>Bill Goins | Federal Express-&nbsp; NAHSRG LLC Board Chair</strong></p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://tpec.umn.edu/about/structure/board/" target="_self">his profile on the U of M's Transportation Policy and Economic Competitiveness Advisory Board's page</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Bill has served as Worldwide Account Manager for FedEx Services for the past 15+ years, providing strategic planning, account management and supply chain leadership to several major corporations that are headquartered in the State of Minnesota.&nbsp; His most recent focus, for the past 10+ years, has been in the Healthcare Industry working with their transportation and supply chain requirements.&nbsp; Bill and his family were located at the FedEx Headquarters in Memphis, TN, for 4 years where he was engaged in strategic logistics marketing, sales training in total logistics cost management and the creation of a Business Development program to support Supply Chain requirements globally between FedEx and major customers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>His transportation and logistics experience includes 20+ years of active duty and reserve assignments in the US Navy Supply Corp where he has retired as a Navy Commander. Bill has also been an adjunct professor at the Carlson School of Management, (CSOM), at the University of Minnesota;&nbsp; a 10+ year member and currently acting Chairman of the Minnesota Freight Advisory Committee, (MFAC);&nbsp;&nbsp; on the Supply Chain Advisory Board at CSOM and on the Board of&nbsp; Advisors for the Center for Transportation Studies at the U of M. Bill holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Minnesota, plus an MBA degree in Transportation and Logistics from Golden Gate University in San Francisco.</p></blockquote><p><strong>Chris Terry | Knutson Mortgage</strong></p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.postbulletin.com/business/heard-on-the-street-knutson-construction-gets-new-rochester-chief/article_e2263349-9284-5325-8ff7-9bfdf91e30cc.html" target="_self">the Rochester Post Bulletin</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Chris Terry was promoted to vice president of business development [for Knutson Construction]. Terry will be responsible for leading business development for all offices. Previously serving as director of business development for Knutson's locations in Wisconsin and Rochester, Terry will continue to live in Rochester and build upon the company's growth by working closely with Leimer and the Rochester team. He has worked at Knutson for three years.</p></blockquote><p>According to<a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/christerry1" target="_self">&nbsp;his Linked in profile,</a>&nbsp;Terry worked in the banking sector for many years.</p><p><a href="http://www.knutsonconstruction.com/" target="_self">Knutson Construction Services</a>&nbsp;employs 500 people,<a href="http://www.knutsonconstruction.com/our-firm/" target="_self">&nbsp;with offices</a>&nbsp;in Minneapolis, Iowa City, Rochester, Cedar Rapids, and Altoona.</p><p><strong>Dale Wahlstrom | Act 3</strong></p><p>Wahlstrom is the former president and CEO of St. Louis Park-based LifeScience Alley and its subsidiary, the BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota;&nbsp;<a href="http://tcbmag.com/News/Recent-News/2014/March/LifeScience-Alley-Leader-Wahlstrom-Retiring;-Repla" target="_self">he retired in 2014</a>.</p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=4&amp;ved=0CDEQFjAD&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.worthington-minnesota.com%2F_literature_133121%2F2015_Worthington_Bio_-_Conference_Program&amp;ei=784YVb6dOdiwogSHwoKwCw&amp;usg=AFQjCNGw4VE2p9nf6HPksR-rMwX3F0JuvA&amp;sig2=_ZA4g0ZP0gRiYGqdu8qTnA&amp;bvm=bv.89381419,d.cGU" target="_self">the program</a>&nbsp;for a conference in Worthington where he'll be presenting next month, Walstrom is now:</p><blockquote><p>President and CEO of Act 3, LLC, a consulting, engineering, and investment firm that focuses on helping companies to expand their global markets, assisting start up companies, and providing unique program management services in the development of capabilities that extend across public private sectors</p></blockquote><p><strong>David Williams&nbsp; | University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management</strong></p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidiwilliams" target="_self">Williams' Linked in profile,</a>he serves as Chief Innovation Officer &amp; VP of Strategic Alliances for the Carlson School's executive education program.&nbsp; Describing his position, he writes:</p><blockquote><p>I focus on business trends/challenges and the impact/opportunity globally. I partner with leaders in corporations, start-ups, government, and research. I'm a part of a fantastic team of experts built to engage directly with business to help them innovate and compete in today's ever changing landscape. My role is to define, design, and develop products and services. Through collaboration with multi-discipline faculty and practitioners, we are able identify best practices to improve organizations and business models. My long term mission is to help cultivate global communities of practice and help engage the world in life long learning. This takes many forms including global summits, programs for networking peers and mentors, and driving the social conversation.</p></blockquote><p><strong>Lynnette Crandall | Dorsey &amp; Partners</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.dorsey.com/crandall_lynnette/" target="_self">According to her page</a>&nbsp;on the Dorsey &amp; Whitney website:</p><p>Lynnette Slater Crandall, a leading expert on economic development tools and public-private development projects, is a partner at Dorsey &amp; Whitney LLP, Chair of the Firm's Public-Private Project Development practice group, member of the Public Finance and Legislative practice groups, and Chair of the Political Law subgroup. . . .</p><p>Lynnette’s Public-Private Project Development practice includes some of the most innovative public-private development projects in the region and the country. . . .</p><p><strong>Representative Engagements</strong></p><ul><li>Counsel to the Minnesota Sports Facility Authority, the public entity that will own and operate the $1 billion plus People’s Stadium, which will serve as the future home of the Minnesota Vikings.</li><li>Counsel to Mayo Clinic in the passage of the Destination Medical Center (DMC) legislation signed into law in May 2013 as part of the omnibus tax bill. DMC will help fund the public infrastructure required to keep pace with an estimated $5 billion in private investment by Mayo Clinic and other private entities over the next 20 years, all aimed at securing Rochester’s and Minnesota’s position as a global medical destination.</li><li>Bond counsel to Hennepin County, issuer of over $350 million tax-exempt bonds to finance Target Field, the major league baseball stadium of the Minnesota Twins. Bonds were issued under a Master Indenture in several tranches and both fixed and variable rate series.</li><li>Counsel to County, Regional Rail Authority and Housing and Redevelopment Authority for Target Field Station, a private development-oriented, multi-modal transit hub.</li><li>Counsel to joint venture Transit Improvement Board, which funds urban transit infrastructure improvements, including light rail and commuter rail, on a multi-jurisdictional basis. . . .</li></ul><p><strong>Mark Loftus | Dakota Electric</strong></p><p>According to Dakota Electric Association's&nbsp;<a href="http://ecd.dakotaelectric.com/dakota-electric-association/about-us/staff/?item=401" target="_self">webpage for Loftus</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Mark Lofthus has been the economic development director at Dakota Electric Association since November 2012. Before that, he was employed for 24 years at the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, in business and community development program management. Preceding his time with the state, he worked for six years in Marshall, Minnesota for a community development group.</p><p>Mark has a B.A. in economics from the University of Minnesota, and an M.A. in public administration from Minnesota State University, Mankato.</p><p>Mark is on the board of the Dakota-Scott Workforce Investment Board, and the board of Dakota County Regional Chamber of Commerce. Since 2011, he has been a board member for “Think Small,” a statewide nonprofit organization devoted to enhancing early childhood education, and also serves on the board of the Minnesota Economic Development Foundation.</p></blockquote><p>The Dakota Electric Association is the second largest electric cooperative in Minnesota, according to the member co-op's<a href="http://ecd.dakotaelectric.com/dakota-electric-association/about-us" target="_self">&nbsp;About Us page</a>.</p><p><strong>Mark Phillips | Kraus Anderson</strong></p><p>Phillips is no longer&nbsp;<a href="http://www.krausanderson.com/state-commissioner-mark-phillips-returns-to-kraus-anderson.html" target="_self">director of business development Kraus-Anderson Construction Company,&nbsp;</a>having been appointed&nbsp;<a href="http://mn.gov/irrrb/about-us/who-we-are/commissioners-office.jsp" target="_self">commissioner of Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board (IRRRB)</a>&nbsp;by Governor Mark Dayton in January 2015.</p><p>According to&nbsp;<a href="http://mn.gov/irrrb/about-us/who-we-are/commissioners-office.jsp" target="_self">the IRRRB website:</a></p><blockquote><p>He previously had served as the agency’s director of economic development from 1983 to 1988. Phillips has more than 25 years of leadership in development and finance, including launching new and creative programs for community and economic development, real estate development and business financing.</p><p>He most recently served as director of business development at Kraus-Anderson Construction Company. Prior to that, he served as commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED), as vice president of Northeast Ventures Corporation and as director of development for Minnesota Power.</p><p>Phillips is a graduate of the Minnesota Executive Program within the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota and has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Minnesota Duluth. He also is a recipient of the Economic Development Association of Minnesota’s Career Achievement Award.</p></blockquote><p>It's an impressive background, but we're curious how much time Phillips will be able to commit to advising on any project outside of the Iron Range--if he remains on the NAHSRG LLC's board after the appointment.</p><p><strong>Wendy Meadley | Social Wendy Group</strong></p><p>At Social Wendy,&nbsp;<a href="http://socialwendygroup.com/wendy-meadley/" target="_self">Meadley bills herself</a>&nbsp;as as an Author and&nbsp; Social Anthropologist; she earned her "Executive MBA and Project Management Certification from the University of St Thomas."</p><p>Recently, she's been in charge of<a href="http://socialwendygroup.com/expo2023/" target="_self">&nbsp;the strategic communications, Minnesota State Fair presence and&nbsp;partner development&nbsp;for Expo 2023</a>, Minnesota's World Fair. A much-ballyhooed&nbsp;<a href="https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/expo-2023-the-minnesota-world-s-fair#home" target="_self">2014 Indiegogo campaign</a>&nbsp;to raise $200,000 came up short, raising only 7 percent of its goal, $13,133 before the deadline.</p><p><strong>Who's who in the Zip Rail's opposition</strong></p>As we've noted before, citizen opposition to the project has been organizing since 2013. Carlson reports in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.postbulletin.com/news/politics/long-road-ahead-for-private-rail-developer/article_50c1d5a8-c6f3-5c6f-8219-c691b543c5cf.html" target="_self">Long road ahead for private rail developer</a>:<blockquote><p>Several high-speed rail opponents traveled to St. Paul on Thursday in hopes of attending the legislative gathering. One of them was Nora Bryson Felton, co-founder of Citizens Concerned About Rail Line. Felton said she was very disappointed she did not get the chance to ask company leaders questions.</p><p>"I want to know that they have the wherewithal that if they start this that it's not going to end up being half done, and we're left to both pay for it or clean up it up or subsidize it forever," the Cannon Falls resident said.</p></blockquote><p>The PB's Brett Boese reported in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.postbulletin.com/news/local/zip-rail-critics-get-a-seat-at-the-table/article_7e32005d-00d1-5901-af26-516b5bd24e0e.html" target="_self">Zip Rail critics get a seat at the table</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Critics of the controversial Zip Rail project are working hard to ensure their voices get heard during a critical year of the planning process.</p><p>Goodhue County citizens Nora Bryson Felton and Heather Arndt, two of the project's most vocal critics, were added to Zip Rail's Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) in November. They've attended just one meeting thus far, but Felton says it's "helped us understand the process better and report back to our group.</p></blockquote><p>Citizens Concerned About the Rail Line (CCARL) will hold its&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/459186800910997/" target="_self">next meeting on April 9 in Cannon Falls.</a></p><p><a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2014/06/semn-irrigators-organizer-bashes-brown-trout-as-invasive-species-at-sw-metro-tea-party-meeting.html" target="_self">Bluestem reported in 2014&nbsp;</a>that Felton was a guest speaker at the SW Metro Tea Party in Chanhassen, talking about the DNR and water quality. An organizer for the SEMN Irrigators Association and a correspondent for the Cannon Falls Beacon, Felton ran unsuccessfully for&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nora-Bryson-Felton-for-Goodhue-County/717907968265338" target="_self">Goodhue County commissioner in 2014</a>.</p><p>Heather Arndt farms near<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hader,_Minnesota" target="_self">&nbsp;Hader, in Goodhue County.</a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>If you appreciate Bluestem Prairie, you can mail contributions (payable to Sally Jo Sorensen P.O. Box 108, Maynard MN 56260) or use the paypal button below:</strong></p><p><em>[See original post here:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2015/03/whos-got-a-ticket-to-ride-on-private-zip-rail.html">http://www.bluestemprairie.com/bluestemprairie/2015/03/whos-got-a-ticket-to-ride-on-private-zip-rail.html</a>]</em></p></div> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/30/whos-got-ticket-ride-private-zip-rail#comments Business high speed rail Rochester transportation zip rail Transportation Downtown Minnesota Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:10:59 +0000 107243 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net MUSIC REVIEW | Stevie Wonder a marvel at the Target Center http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/30/music-review-photos-stevie-wonder-target-center-minneapolis <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/30/music-review-photos-stevie-wonder-target-center-minneapolis" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/30/sw_004.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/caleb-baumgartner" title="View user profile.">Caleb Baumgartner</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>The very moment that <a href="http://www.steviewonder.net/" target="_blank">Stevie Wonder</a> was lead out to the stage by<a href="http://www.soulbird.com/" target="_blank"> India Arie</a>, he had the crowd in the palm of his hand.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/30/music-review-photos-stevie-wonder-target-center-minneapolis"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The very moment that <a href="http://www.steviewonder.net/" target="_blank">Stevie Wonder</a> was lead out to the stage by<a href="http://www.soulbird.com/" target="_blank"> India Arie</a>, he had the crowd in the palm of his hand.<!--break--></p><p>The nearly sold-out crowd in the Target Center rose to their feet for an extended standing ovation before even a single song was sung, before even a single word was spoken, a grand tribute to a musical legend who decades-long legacy has left an incredible impact on the industry. This crowd knew who this man was, and from the start were aching to show him both respect and appreciation on a grand (and very audible) scale.</p><p>For his part, Stevie Wonder did not disappoint. Accompanied by a massive supporting cast of musicians and singers, Wonder displayed an incredible vocal range for his age as he guided the audience through the ups and downs of his <em>Songs in the Key of Life</em> album. The setlist was wonderfully arranged, maneuvering deftly between the slower, more soulful tracks, tracks like “Village Ghetto Land” and “Love’s in Need of Love Today”, and those fast, upbeat, and infinitely danceable tracks that brought the crowd to their feet again and again to dance like no one was watching, tracks like “Sir Duke” and “I Wish.”</p><p>Wonder was more than just on point with his music; his playful stage-banter was a sight to behold. In engaging with a bit of improvisation with his backup singers, Wonder simultaneously showed off a very warm personality while giving those folks in the background a chance to shine.</p><p>If there was really any criticism to lob at this performance, it would have to be levied at a rather long and ponderous jam session that seemed to drag a touch. The reluctance of the string section, composed of local musicians, to engage with the improv was probably a big part of that situation, but one could imagine it may be a bit difficult to step up to the plate on Stevie Wonder’s stage, even with his support and blessing.</p><p>Overall, this was a great show, an opportunity not to be missed. The fact that Stevie Wonder can still perform at this level is incredible. Wonder played up to his status with an unforgettable performance that absolutely electrified those in attendance and brought the near-capacity crowd at the Target Center to their feet in a celebration of joy that was incredible to be a part of.&nbsp;</p><hr /><p><em>Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Caleb Baumgartner (text) and Patrick Dunn (photos) </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/30/music-review-photos-stevie-wonder-target-center-minneapolis#comments CC area Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Downtown Mon, 30 Mar 2015 09:44:39 +0000 107235 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Al Milgrom introduces film and history to generations http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/29/al-milgrom-introduces-film-and-history-generations <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/29/al-milgrom-introduces-film-and-history-generations" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/29/ellenpencein1970.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/bill-huntzicker" title="View user profile.">Bill Huntzicker</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/121387504" width="500" frameborder="0" height="281"></iframe></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/29/al-milgrom-introduces-film-and-history-generations"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/121387504" width="500" frameborder="0" height="281"></iframe></p><p><a href="https://vimeo.com/121387504">Dinkytown Short Trailer Al's Version</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user25304198">Albert Milgrom</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p><p>Al Milgrom spent 50 years introducing Minnesotans to films they would not otherwise see and now he’s working to show them the history they’ve forgotten.</p><p>“When I’m talking to kids in Dinkytown,” says Milgrom who has spent most of his 92 years around the University of Minnesota, “they have no idea what went on – right there on the sidewalks they walk on, on their way to the U.”</p><p>To improve their historical awareness, Milgrom will premiere his own film, “The Dinkytown Uprising,” at 6 p.m. April 12 and 2 p.m. April 20 at the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, an event he created 34 years ago.</p><p>The<a href="http://mspfilm.org"> festival</a>, which opens April 9 will screen more than 200 films this year at the St. Anthony Main Theater in Southeast Minneapolis.</p><p>Milgrom’s first feature-length documentary tells the story of a month-long protest in 1970 that involved a cast of hundreds, perhaps thousands, to protest the demolition of small businesses and the construction of a fast-food restaurant in Dinkytown, a quaint business district adjacent to the University’s Minneapolis campus.</p><p>“The whole idea was there was a ‘70s generation of activists, idealists – some went so far as to call themselves revolutionaries – who aren’t here anymore,” Milgrom said. “This was the baby boomer generation that was liberal politically. They ended up out of step with the conservative turn of the United States, even today.”</p><p>“The Dinkytown Uprising” has literally been 45 years in the making, beginning when Milgrom filmed the takeover of two Dinktytown buildings on April 1, 1970, by protestors who wanted to prevent their demolition to make way for a Red Barn fast-food restaurant. Five small businesses, including a shoe-repair shop and Lou’s Diner, had been evicted from the buildings.</p><p>Milgrom and his 16mm Éclair movie camera stayed with the protestors for more than a month, filming their activities, interviewing participants about their ideals and goals, and witnessing as police in riot gear forcefully evicted them in the dark at 4 a.m. on May 6, 1970, while bulldozers took down the buildings.</p><p>Later the same day, he followed demonstrators to a Red Barn restaurant near Oak and Washington on the other side of campus the where protestors were arrested when police forcefully cleared the sidewalk. Within a day, protestors also created a park and planted a “peace garden” on the cleared site. Some roasted wieners over an open fire and others put up antiwar messages and a blue-and-red poster labeled “Dinkytown Occupation Forces.”</p><p>Milgrom’s contemporary interviews intersect with interviews made over the years as people reminisced, explained their behavior and reflected on how the Red Barn protests affected their lives.</p><p>In the film, Dr. David Pence, a Mankato physician, chuckled as he watches a video of himself 40 years earlier calling through a megaphone for revolution. “We saw that restraining orders and petitions weren’t going to work,” Pence said. “We were in a time of trying to build a new community of ‘love and peace’ against a community of ‘militarism and money,’” Pence said, adding that he no longer talks or thinks in those terms. And, he said, the actions supporting small businesses were not revolutionary.</p><p>His sister, Ellen Pence, joined the Red Barn and antiwar activities to follow her brother. Unlike him, she continued to work for social justice causes until her death from cancer in 2012. Facing death after her diagnosis, she said, she meditated on her life, “and I always come back to this time.” The civil rights movement, the antiwar movement and the women’s movement brought great social change, she said. “Very few people can say that in their life major social change happened, and I got to be involved in it.”</p><p>Milgrom evokes poignant feelings from some whom he interviewed, and he’s sure to spark some from the audience, especially among people who lived through the events.</p><p>He interviewed the late Professor Allan Spear of Minneapolis, who served 27 years in the Minnesota Senate, before he died in 2008. “In those days, it didn’t take much to get me up on a box and to put a microphone in my hand,” Spear said, adding that he had not yet been elected to political office. “Red barn was seen as a big corporation … we said the Red Barn was doing to Dinkytown what the United States military was doing in Vietnam. … It sounds far-fetched. It was far-fetched.”</p><p>News reports kept local anger alive. President Nixon announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia on the same day as a local court issued an order evicting the protestors for trespassing. The forced removal of protestors came a day after National Guardsmen killed four antiwar protestors at Kent State University in Ohio. A photograph of Ellen Pence’s arrest at the Red Barn on Oak Street appeared in Time magazine in a collage of national photos of antiwar protests. In the photo, she appears to be choking because of the officer’s baton on her neck.</p><p>Local social change also played a role. Milgrom reports that Dinkytown was once a few blocks of “ma-and-pa shops, small businesses and bookstores.” During the late 1960s, Spear added, Dinkytown had become more counter cultural than the small business district it once was. Nonetheless, several protestors discussed how Dinkytown felt personal, like a small town a block away from the large University campus. It was like nowhere else, with locally owned small businesses.</p><p>The film will be shown as part of the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, MSPIFF, that opens April 9.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/29/al-milgrom-introduces-film-and-history-generations#comments Media MSPIFF11 Arts Movies Daily Planet Originals Mon, 30 Mar 2015 04:23:54 +0000 107229 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Videos: Lorna Landvik & John Marty http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/29/videos-lorna-landvik-john-marty <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/29/videos-lorna-landvik-john-marty" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/29/marty.lornvik.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jeff-strate" title="View user profile.">Jeff Strate</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>Author Lorna Landvik reveals that her recent novel best to<strong>&nbsp;Best to Laugh</strong>&nbsp;borrows some from her own life in&nbsp;Hollywood.</p> <span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/29/videos-lorna-landvik-john-marty"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Author Lorna Landvik reveals that her recent novel best to<strong>&nbsp;Best to Laugh</strong>&nbsp;borrows some from her own life in&nbsp;Hollywood. &nbsp;Minnesota’s most gifted humorist, like the Korean-American protagonist of her book, had been a stand-up comedy hopeful in L.A. who supported herself with a series of eclectic temp jobs and a residential complex injected with LaLa Land characters and urban legend.&nbsp; Landvik also tells of her real-life adventures on the 3,700 miles long Peace March for Nuclear Disarmament from L.A. to D.C. in 1986.&nbsp; Landvik's quick, sharp and easy wit is a delight that is rarely seen on home flatscreens. I consider her <em>Dem Vis</em> appearance a satisfying stew of sly insight on being Minnesotan.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>State Senator John Marty, Minnesota's leading progressive law maker, here makes a&nbsp;solid case to Democratic Visions host Tim O’Brien for SF 890 the "Worker Dignity Bill."&nbsp; Marty (DFL, Roseville) and co-author Senator Chris Eaton (DFL, Brooklyn Center) proposed legislation would extend the phased-in minimum wage increase; increase the working family credit to exceed the federal earned income tax; provide increased child care assistance to all low-income workers and, among other actions, would reform MinnCare.&nbsp; SF 890 was referred to the Senate Committee on Health, Human Services and Housing on February 16 where it awaits further action.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The full version of the current Democratic Visions includes a short segment on the St. Olaf College dedication of its memorial to civil rights martyr James Reeb.&nbsp; Rev. Reeb, a 1950 graduate of the Northfield school, was murdered in Selma, Alabama fifty years ago.&nbsp; He and two other activist clergy had been beaten on the evening of the “Turnaround Tuesday”&nbsp; march led by Dr. Martin Luther King.&nbsp; This demonstration had concluded with prayer on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on the highway to Montgomery, the Alabama State Capitol.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lorna Landvik <em>on Dem Vis</em> -</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hv7-quYbWXg" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hv7-quYbWXg</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>John Marty on Dem Vis -</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG_Gp8M90U0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG_Gp8M90U0</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Full Democratic Visions program</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAgWRNasNKo" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAgWRNasNKo</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>CABLE TV SCHEDULE</p> <p>Eden Prairie, Richfield, Minnetonka, Edina and Hopkins Comcast Channel 15 – Saturdays 2:00 p.m.. Sundays 9 p.m., Mondays 10 p.m., Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.,&nbsp;</p> <p>Bloomington – BCAT Channel 16 — Tuesdays at 2:00 p.m. &amp; 10:00 p.m.; Fridays at 9:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 7:30 a.m. &amp; 2:30 p.m.</p> <p>Minneapolis – MTN Channel 16 — Sundays at 8:30 p.m., Mondays 3:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m.&nbsp; Program is streamed at the MTN website during cablecasts.</p> <p>Champlin, Anoka,Ramsey, Andover – QCTV Channel 15<strong>.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.qctv.org/qctvguide15.php" target="_blank">Click here for schedule</a>.</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;<em></em></p> <p><em>Democratic Visions</em>&nbsp;is produced by Eden Prairie, Minnetonka and Edina volunteers at the Bloomington Community Access TV studio. <em>Democratic Visions</em>&nbsp;is not funded, endorsed or supported by any political party or political action committee.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/29/videos-lorna-landvik-john-marty#comments author best to laugh democratic visions Hollywood jeff strate legislation lorna landvik Minnesota peace march Senator John Marty tim o'brien worker dignity bill Books Community Voices Politics & Policy Sun, 29 Mar 2015 20:32:35 +0000 107223 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net MUSIC REVIEW | Moon and Pollution rise over Icehouse http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/29/moon-and-pollution-icehouse-minneapolis <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/29/moon-and-pollution-icehouse-minneapolis" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/29/moon_and_pollution_1.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ann-treacy" title="View user profile.">Ann Treacy</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>I spent too much time on the way home from Icehouse explaining that <a href="http://www.ftoitox.com/moonandpollution/" target="_blank">Moon and Pollution</a> was electronica, but nothing like EDM, not as pounding and impersonal. I’ll stand by electronica but electronic pop is probably a more apt description.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/29/moon-and-pollution-icehouse-minneapolis"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>I spent too much time on the way home from Icehouse explaining that <a href="http://www.ftoitox.com/moonandpollution/" target="_blank">Moon and Pollution</a> was electronica, but nothing like EDM, not as pounding and impersonal. I’ll stand by electronica but electronic pop is probably a more apt description.<!--break--></p><p>For an electronic pop duo, Moon and Pollution has a lot of instruments on stage, which I think gives is a richer sound. Core members include Molly Dean and Graham O’Brien but there were others on stage last night, which again adds to the richness of the sound.</p><p>The drums set a pace that drives the songs forward. It’s a smart use of beat; together with the synthesized beats there’s a layering that again is not like the pounding of EDM but a more mature and subtle sound. (Not that there isn’t a time and place for EDM.)</p><p>The guitars are a nice addition too but it’s really Dean’s voice that captures the attention. There’s something a little haunting or other-worldly about her voice. It contrasts with the reverb and electronic rhythm making it very easy to listen to the music, not in a way where the music gets lost but more like the audience gets lost in the music. &nbsp;</p><p>The audience really seemed to like them and I know they have been called a band to watch. It would be great to see them do well in Minneapolis and beyond.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Ann Treacy </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/29/moon-and-pollution-icehouse-minneapolis#comments Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Sun, 29 Mar 2015 20:15:28 +0000 107222 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net MUSIC REVIEW | Gregg Allman timeless at the Pantages Theatre http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/28/11024786_1570969039822446_1123750208812453893_n.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/betsygee7" title="View user profile.">betsygee7</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.greggallman.com/index.php" target="_blank">Gregg Allman</a> and his eight piece traveling band, in the midst of a spring tour, played to a sold-out house at Hennepin Theatre Trust's Pantages Theatre on March 27. The storied bluesy-rock icon still wears his hair long and his tattoos proudly. He looks great and his signature voice still resonates with a tender clarity that welcomes you while his rasp makes you ache. As a founding member of the legendary "The Allman Brothers" band, he's been writing and performing for 50 years—give or take a few-but his talent, and contribution to music history, is timeless.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.greggallman.com/index.php" target="_blank">Gregg Allman</a> and his eight piece traveling band, in the midst of a spring tour, played to a sold-out house at Hennepin Theatre Trust's Pantages Theatre on March 27. The storied bluesy-rock icon still wears his hair long and his tattoos proudly. He looks great and his signature voice still resonates with a tender clarity that welcomes you while his rasp makes you ache. As a founding member of the legendary "The Allman Brothers" band, he's been writing and performing for 50 years—give or take a few-but his talent, and contribution to music history, is timeless.<!--break--></p><div>Allman, on vocals, guitar and Hammond B-3 organ, was playing his customarily stage right position for most of the show. He shared the spotlight (center stage) with guitarist and music director Scott Sharrard. The band was rounded out with Ron Johnson on bass, Peter Levin on keyboards, Steve Potts on drums (thanks for standing up during intros so we could all see'ya!), and Marc Quinones on percussion. Jay Collins, Art Edmaiston and Marc Franklin were the horn section, delivering some fantastic, latin infused melodies throughout the show, let alone epic "horn-as-guitar response" solos as needed. Blues, latin, jazz, funk and rock-n-roll all shared the stage with enthusiasm and some might say, perfection. It's a world-class band who peeled through Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues," Muddy Waters' " I Can't Be Satisfied," Sonny Boy Williamson's "One Way Out" (the encore) along with Allman signatures like "Whipping Post," "<span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1133891431"><span class="aQJ">Midnight</span></span>&nbsp;Rider," "Dreams," "Soul Shine" and others.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The audience was full of die-hard fans showing their love with standing ovations throughout the night. The night started with "Statesboro Blues" off "At Fillmore East" followed by "I'm No Angel." These two songs happened to illustrate my personal Allman history. I was able to see the show with my cousin, who not only used to have hair that rivaled Allman's, but who also had taken me to see Dickie Betts at the Cabooze years ago (one good turn deserves another). We talked about our Allman purchased 'firsts'. His being in 1971/1972 with "At Fillmore East" that features "Statesboro Blues" via an old record club subscription, mine being Gregg's "I'm No Angel" (admittedly more 'pop') album in 1987 via Positively 4th Street (or was it Cheapo?).</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Allman brings the story of rock and roll with him in his fans who range from whiskey-drinkin'-and-dancin' women (<em>you know (and we love) who you are</em>) to stationary, solitary men giving witness to the musicians with adoration, awe and a little bit of envy. It was a little bit like going to church. We have nothing but praise for a long and winding career full of hard living and redemption. Although there were a few refrains where you could hear audience members singing along, it was clear people came to primarily party with and give props to a guy who's music carried them through the tumultuous late '60's and '70's and has sustained them ever since.&nbsp;</div><div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>After this spring tour, Allman continues on throughout the summer, often sharing the gig with The Doobie Brothers. Find out details on his web site:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.greggallman.com/" target="_blank">www.greggallman.com</a>&nbsp;and get your fix while you still can.&nbsp;</div><div><hr /><em>Coverage of issues and events that&nbsp;affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part&nbsp;by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative</em></div></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Betsy Gabler </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre#comments CC area Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Sat, 28 Mar 2015 20:00:17 +0000 107218 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net