Twin Cities Daily Planet | Latest Headlines http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/columnists en MUSIC REVIEW | Gregg Allman timeless at the Pantages Theatre http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/28/11024786_1570969039822446_1123750208812453893_n.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/betsygee7" title="View user profile.">betsygee7</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.greggallman.com/index.php" target="_blank">Gregg Allman</a> and his eight piece traveling band, in the midst of a spring tour, played to a sold-out house at Hennepin Theatre Trust's Pantages Theatre on March 27. The storied bluesy-rock icon still wears his hair long and his tattoos proudly. He looks great and his signature voice still resonates with a tender clarity that welcomes you while his rasp makes you ache. As a founding member of the legendary "The Allman Brothers" band, he's been writing and performing for 50 years—give or take a few-but his talent, and contribution to music history, is timeless.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.greggallman.com/index.php" target="_blank">Gregg Allman</a> and his eight piece traveling band, in the midst of a spring tour, played to a sold-out house at Hennepin Theatre Trust's Pantages Theatre on March 27. The storied bluesy-rock icon still wears his hair long and his tattoos proudly. He looks great and his signature voice still resonates with a tender clarity that welcomes you while his rasp makes you ache. As a founding member of the legendary "The Allman Brothers" band, he's been writing and performing for 50 years—give or take a few-but his talent, and contribution to music history, is timeless.<!--break--></p><div>Allman, on vocals, guitar and Hammond B-3 organ, was playing his customarily stage right position for most of the show. He shared the spotlight (center stage) with guitarist and music director Scott Sharrard. The band was rounded out with Ron Johnson on bass, Peter Levin on keyboards, Steve Potts on drums (thanks for standing up during intros so we could all see'ya!), and Marc Quinones on percussion. Jay Collins, Art Edmaiston and Marc Franklin were the horn section, delivering some fantastic, latin infused melodies throughout the show, let alone epic "horn-as-guitar response" solos as needed. Blues, latin, jazz, funk and rock-n-roll all shared the stage with enthusiasm and some might say, perfection. It's a world-class band who peeled through Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues," Muddy Waters' " I Can't Be Satisfied," Sonny Boy Williamson's "One Way Out" (the encore) along with Allman signatures like "Whipping Post," "<span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1133891431"><span class="aQJ">Midnight</span></span>&nbsp;Rider," "Dreams," "Soul Shine" and others.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The audience was full of die-hard fans showing their love with standing ovations throughout the night. The night started with "Statesboro Blues" off "At Fillmore East" followed by "I'm No Angel." These two songs happened to illustrate my personal Allman history. I was able to see the show with my cousin, who not only used to have hair that rivaled Allman's, but who also had taken me to see Dickie Betts at the Cabooze years ago (one good turn deserves another). We talked about our Allman purchased 'firsts'. His being in 1971/1972 with "At Fillmore East" that features "Statesboro Blues" via an old record club subscription, mine being Gregg's "I'm No Angel" (admittedly more 'pop') album in 1987 via Positively 4th Street (or was it Cheapo?).</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Allman brings the story of rock and roll with him in his fans who range from whiskey-drinkin'-and-dancin' women (<em>you know (and we love) who you are</em>) to stationary, solitary men giving witness to the musicians with adoration, awe and a little bit of envy. It was a little bit like going to church. We have nothing but praise for a long and winding career full of hard living and redemption. Although there were a few refrains where you could hear audience members singing along, it was clear people came to primarily party with and give props to a guy who's music carried them through the tumultuous late '60's and '70's and has sustained them ever since.&nbsp;</div><div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>After this spring tour, Allman continues on throughout the summer, often sharing the gig with The Doobie Brothers. Find out details on his web site:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.greggallman.com/" target="_blank">www.greggallman.com</a>&nbsp;and get your fix while you still can.&nbsp;</div><div><hr /><em>Coverage of issues and events that&nbsp;affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part&nbsp;by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative</em></div></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Betsy Gabler </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-review-gregg-allman-pantages-theatre#comments CC area Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Sat, 28 Mar 2015 20:00:17 +0000 107218 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net PREVIEW | Safe Hands Animal Rescue benefit concert: Music is stepping up for the dogs http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-stepping-dogs-and-you-re-invited-april-12 <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-stepping-dogs-and-you-re-invited-april-12" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/28/dog_concert.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ann-treacy" title="View user profile.">Ann Treacy</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>If you like music and dogs I might have a fun date for you. Musicians from both the Minnesota Orchestra and Minnesota Opera are performing at a fundraiser for <a href="http://www.safehandsrescue.org/" target="_blank">Safe Hands Animal Rescue</a> on April 12 at 3:00 pm at Colonial Church in Edina.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/28/music-stepping-dogs-and-you-re-invited-april-12"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If you like music and dogs I might have a fun date for you. Musicians from both the Minnesota Orchestra and Minnesota Opera are performing at a fundraiser for <a href="http://www.safehandsrescue.org/" target="_blank">Safe Hands Animal Rescue</a> on April 12 at 3:00 pm at Colonial Church in Edina.<!--break--></p><p>This event will include social hour and music by Rossini, Britten, Beethoven, Ravel, Mozart, and Elgar.At least a dozen musicians will perform, including many with a personal investment in Safe Hands Animal Rescue.</p><p>The benefit concert is the brainchild of violist Jennifer Strom.&nbsp; Jennifer adopted her dog Moxie from Safe Hands and began volunteering with the organization.&nbsp; As word spread other orchestra members followed suit with eight members to date having adopted 10 dogs from Safe Hands.&nbsp; Six musicians performing have adopted dogs and six members have fostered dogs or volunteered.</p><p>The concert aims to raise awareness and money to support Safe Hands efforts to rescue homeless dogs from rural shelters with high intake and low adoption rates.</p><p>Safe Hands Animal Rescue is a nonprofit organization led by Lynne Bengtson (pictured above) with the help of a small group of dedicated volunteers. Safe Hands has rescued and placed more than 3,200 dogs since its founding in October 2006. Most of the dogs the organization aids come from high-kill shelters in the southeastern Kentucky/Appalachia area. The dogs are transported from Kentucky to IL, WI and the Twin Cities. When the dogs arrive in Minnesota they are welcomed by a team of volunteers. Each dog is examined by a vet, treated for any medical conditions if needed and&nbsp; sent home with a foster who cares for them until they can find their forever family.</p><p>Second Annual Concert to benefit Safe Hands Animal Rescue <br /> Sunday April 12<sup>th</sup> at Colonial Church <br /> 6200 Colonial Way, Edina 55436<br /> Time: 3 p.m.-6 p.m.<br /> Musical Performance: 3 p.m.-5 p.m.<br /> Social Hour: 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Light snacks and refreshments<br /> Suggested Donation at the Door: $20</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Ann Treacy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-relatedevent"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/events/safe-hands-rescue-benefit-concert-chamber-music">Safe Hands Rescue Benefit Concert - Chamber Music</a> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/music-stepping-dogs-and-you-re-invited-april-12#comments Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Sat, 28 Mar 2015 15:37:40 +0000 107211 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net ART REVIEW | Don't miss "In Which ____ and Others Discover the End Performance" http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/which-and-others-discover-end-performance <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/28/which-and-others-discover-end-performance" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/28/inwhich_1.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ann-treacy" title="View user profile.">Ann Treacy</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>I love the idea of mashing up visual art, music and dance. Just last month I enjoyed a similar show (<em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/02/21/stripe-tease-vignettes-dancing-art-and-musical-expectations">Stripe Tease</a></em>) at the Walker. So I was thrilled to get walk-up tickets to the first of the <em><a href="http://publicfunctionary.org/now/" target="_blank">Final Performances of In Which ____ and Others Discover the End Performance</a></em>. I brought my favorite 10-year old date.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/28/which-and-others-discover-end-performance"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>I love the idea of mashing up visual art, music and dance. Just last month I enjoyed a similar show (<em><a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/02/21/stripe-tease-vignettes-dancing-art-and-musical-expectations">Stripe Tease</a></em>) at the Walker. So I was thrilled to get walk-up tickets to the first of the <em><a href="http://publicfunctionary.org/now/" target="_blank">Final Performances of In Which ____ and Others Discover the End Performance</a></em>. I brought my favorite 10-year old date.<!--break--></p><p>There were things we liked about the show, things we didn’t like as much and things that confused us. But we talked about it the whole way home and I think that’s a win for a gallery that&nbsp;“encourages work that challenges the status quo in contemporary art.”</p><p>We liked the art. There was just enough splash of color and the geometric shapes led to a big discussion of CNC machining. The make-do stage and hanging art left a feel like we were in another world or planet. Something almost retro and <em>Twilight Zone</em> about it. And the music. Admittedly participation from Brute Heart was what got me through the door. The music was very subtle and very much in the background but a huge component.</p><p>There is a Beckettian theme through the show, it starts when two performers discuss the body and the impact of a computer job on the body. It’s a circular discussion punctuated by accents, silly voices and the slowing of the bodies on stage. At one point the questioner asks how the interrogated knows she has a body. Because you said I did, was the exasperated answer. They could have been waiting for Godot. It was funny and poignant; something even my date has experienced—the giving over of power to the computer and experiencing the unintended consequence of disembodied feelings.</p><p>Then there was a story of a spring break in Italy and ghosts that may have been ghosts or may have been a figment of lucid dreams. Again very funny and involved more performers. In that segment the story and the movement really complimented each other.</p><p>Then there were some segments where the microscope lifted too high for me. Commentary on climate change, insurance and health care seemed like too much preach without the nuance of art. Now that being said, we enjoyed the movement and the dance throughout. My date liked the repetition of movement and the proximity of the dancers.</p><p>I liked the performers’ use of eyes. Weird in a dance to focus on something that by definition isn’t going to be moving much but there was a scary amount of passion in most of the eyes on stage. It draws you in and keeps you on point, like a good teacher. Added to that intensity is the knowledge that the show is interactive. (My date was asked to read a few lines.) When you command that much attention you depend on nuance and subtlety.</p><p>The show ended with a final speech that harked back to Beckett about “I’m good at this, I love this,” which I think speaks to the idea that we do what we can when we can. The rest isn’t indifference but detachment &nbsp;&nbsp;based I assume on capacity.</p><p><em>Final Performances</em> of <em>In Which ____ and Others Discover the End Performance </em>is showing March 28, 29, April 2, 3 and 4. The free shows are sold out but some spaces are reserved for walk-up audience members. We arrived at 7:00 and had no trouble getting in.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Ann Treacy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-relatedevent"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/events/which-and-others-discover-end-public-functionary">In Which _______ and Others Discover The End at Public Functionary</a> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/28/which-and-others-discover-end-performance#comments Arts Entertainment Music Visual Arts Daily Planet Originals Sat, 28 Mar 2015 14:37:07 +0000 107210 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Theater Review: There are other worlds http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/27/theater-review-there-are-other-worlds <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/27/theater-review-there-are-other-worlds" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/27/screen_shot_2015-03-27_at_2.26.03_pm.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p class="FreeForm">This past weekend, Free Black Dirt presented&nbsp;There Are Other Worlds a play written and directed by Junauda Petrus and produced by Erin Sharkey (these two form the core artisti</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/27/theater-review-there-are-other-worlds"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p class="FreeForm">This past weekend, Free Black Dirt presented&nbsp;There Are Other Worlds a play written and directed by Junauda Petrus and produced by Erin Sharkey (these two form the core artistic team of Free Black Dirt). The work premiered as a work in progress at Open Eye Figure Theatre in 2013 and returns in 2015 as a fully realized play at Intermedia Arts in Minneapolis, MN.</p><p class="Body">I have been carrying around this quote by Toni Morrison.&nbsp; “So Ralph Ellison writes ‘Invisible Man’ and as good as that book is, I have to ask, invisible to whom?&nbsp; Certainly not to me.”&nbsp; She is talking so succinctly about gaze, the white gaze, the male gaze and what it means to make art and for whose gaze.&nbsp;</p><p class="Body">Junauda Petrus’s play There Are Other Worlds is the flip side to this question.&nbsp; The play is clearly written with a black female gaze in mind.&nbsp; The entire cast are women of color and the power and beauty present in this play comes from that root and love of Black Women. That the rest of us are invited to witness and imbibe is a gift and we are all stronger for it.</p><p class="Body">I saw the play on the closing night after six sold out, standing room only performances. Such a response speaks to the fact that there is an audience eager and willing for this kind of work.&nbsp; On the political face of it we might merely say how important it is to support an emerging black woman playwright but this is art and what really matters is the actual work.&nbsp; There are Other Worlds is good theater.&nbsp;</p><p class="Body">The play uses movement, aerial arts, more traditional scenes of dialogue and a vast soundtrack that both grounds the play in the late 1990’s with hip-hop of the time and spans time with music from other eras as the two young women, Dreamah and Sarya explore current music and also discover Sun Ra, Ornette Colman and other jazz greats.&nbsp; The original soundtrack created by Sarah White along with the use of aerial arts takes the play outside the day to day and into the universe/spirit realms.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">Joy Spika and Jordan Hamilton designed the set which is beautiful and layered.&nbsp; Tree branches, paper lanterns and mask like wire sculptures hang from the ceiling.&nbsp; One side of the stage is the bedroom of the teenage daughter Dreamah and is overflowing with rich color and vibrancy.&nbsp; The other side of the stage is stark with a yoga mat and pile of books and serves as the jail cell for Ameri.&nbsp; The stage also holds four location for the long white silks on which the women swing, climb, float, cocoon and spin doing aerial work.&nbsp; The rest of the set design is beautiful, evoking stars and cosmos and quilts and mathematical calculations but was wisely abstract enough to open up the worlds that were being created.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">The play centers on the frayed relationship between Ameri Akenyemi who has been in prison nine years and her two young daughters, the teenage Dreamah and the young adult Gospel.&nbsp; It also revolves around the transformative relationship between Dreamah and the wildly openhearted, Sarya Rice.&nbsp;&nbsp; Also present are ancestors, a group of talented dancers dressed in purple who appear and disappear; never speaking but evoking, dancing and at times literally holding up characters.&nbsp; Although never on stage fathers are also a strong presence with Ameri’s husband who is trying to hold and protect his daughters and Sarya’s father who she is painfully separated from as he deals with mental illness.</p><p class="FreeForm">The cast is universally strong. Nisreen Dawan as the incarcerated mother Ameri Akenyemi was effortless as both a young revolutionary falling in love with a caring man in college and as a 45 year old woman in prison, taken from her husband and daughters and trying to stay whole as one can in those circumstances.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">ShaVunda Horsley as Dreamah Akenyemi carried a good deal of the play forward.&nbsp; Her skill was apparent at being able to play Dreamah as young and innocent but not a caricature of youth.&nbsp; The arc of her characters transformation and path back to her mother and new found strength was both believable and moving.</p><p class="FreeForm">Felicia Perry played Gospel Akenyemi the slightly older and angrier sister and had some of the most challenging scenes both in terms of aerial work and drama.&nbsp; She is a riveting presence on stage and held the sense of anger and suffering without over acting it.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">Alissa Paris played Dreamah’s new found best friend Sarya Rice and had several scene stealing moments.&nbsp; Her kinetic energy and joyfulness were an important part of the play both soothing some of the pain and leading Dreamah forward.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">All of these strong performances are in service to a beautiful script by Junuada Petrus that is multilayered and complex full of humor and a natural ear for dialogue especially between the two young women Dreamah and Sarya.&nbsp; Without being preachy the script touches on a variety of intense issues around revolution and social change, white supremacy, living in a predominately white place, prison, rape, forgiveness, strength and love.&nbsp; So much love.&nbsp; The love of this mother for her children, the love of these young women for each other, family love, love of and love from ancestors, love of Blackness: as a people, as a source of beauty, creation and resistance.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">The use of aerial work was a perfect sister to the writing; the long silks were utilized by various characters and served as trees, wombs, and facilitated various journeys both physical and spiritual the characters embark on.&nbsp;&nbsp; Junuada Petrus wrote in the program about wanting to see more women of color involved in aerial performance and also her inspiration to use aerial as a reclaiming of Black and Brown bodies suspended in space from the horror of lynching.&nbsp; All but one of the actors were new to aerial work and the confidence and trust they had in their own bodies to climb essentially a long piece of cloth and wrap themselves in it and then unfurl often to the ground was beautiful to watch.</p><p class="FreeForm">There were two interconnected things I wanted that were not present.&nbsp; More breath and silence and to see Ameri engaged in her yoga practice. This would have provided a few moments of that pause or silence.&nbsp; It was such a rich play that I wanted a breath here and there to regather the energy.</p><p class="FreeForm">The one experience I had that was puzzling was the applause after each scene.&nbsp; I’m not really sure why it was happening and I talked to someone that attended on Friday night and had the same experience and a similar response. While applause or vocalizing can be an important role for the audience it needs to spring from seeing something particularly moving, fabulous or resonate.&nbsp; It did not always feel spontaneous but more rote, almost condescending to the actors and the play as if they needed constant reassurance that it was good.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">It was refreshing to see a play where ancestors, the spirit realms and indeed other worlds were a part of the reality.&nbsp; We experience this strongest through Dreamah who at first is skeptical but also curious about other realms and through Sarya who is open to all of it and inviting Dreamah to explore.&nbsp;&nbsp; In the scene where Dreamah leaves her body and is held up, carried by the ancestors to reconnect with her mother and sister we see theater as ritual at it’s best.&nbsp; When she comes back into her body and into the room she turns to Sarya and asks, “What was that?”&nbsp; Sarya replies, “I don’t know. YOU?!”&nbsp; It was a beautiful moment and I felt a collective gasp from the audience.</p><p class="FreeForm">When it is revealed Ameri killed a young, white, affluent man who had raped Gospel the scene is devastating.&nbsp; The two daughters sit on the ends of the long silks used for aerial making a huge X across Ameri as she recounts the tale.&nbsp; Dealing with rape in theater is tricky and I have seen many cases where over theatrics actually distances the audience from the reality of it.&nbsp; This was not the case here.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">Ameri speaks of the world she and her husband were working hard to help bring into being for their daughters and all children. She speaks to the shattering pain of this violent act and of being separated from her daughters.&nbsp; She speaks to the reality that this man with privilege could have very easily slipped away without going to prison; as we know so many rapists have.&nbsp; Whatever her choices in that moment Ameri’s commitment is to her daughters, her husband who it is indicated has continued to love and support her through everything and still to a world worthy of her daughters.&nbsp; Whether Ameri made the right choice is left open. Because there really is no answer to that and the fact is she did it and is in prison.&nbsp; Whether she should be in prison for her choice is the real question that opens up so many questions about who is incarcerated and who is not.&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">It is also Ameri who delivers I think one of the most profound lines in the play.&nbsp; She is discussing her yoga practice in prison and she describes learning about the Sanskrit word Ahimsa, which she said was defined many different ways but the way she read it was non-violence and to do no harm, not even in your thoughts.&nbsp; To this she replies (I am paraphrasing her line)&nbsp; “I just about fell out when I read that.&nbsp; I thought who ever came up with this idea never tried to live as a Black person in America.”&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">There Are Other Worlds does not shy away from the pain of living in a country where we still need a movement based in the idea that Black Lives Matter.&nbsp; But Junuada Petrus’s play and her amazing cast are also living, breathing, loving in their bodies, in their pain but in their beauty, strength and vision too.&nbsp; It is the kind of theater we all need for our beautiful, troubled world.&nbsp; I look forward to more work from Free Black Dirt, from Junauda and all the talented, lovely, fierce women that brought this work into being.&nbsp; Check out Free Black Dirt at <a href="http://www.freeblackdirt.com/">http://www.freeblackdirt.com/</a></p><p class="FreeForm">&nbsp;</p><p class="FreeForm">Ellen Marie Hinchcliffe is a poet, filmmaker, performer and loving Auntie and Mama.&nbsp; More at www.fierceshimmer.com</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/27/theater-review-there-are-other-worlds#comments gender identity Intermedia Arts race Arts Theater Race/Ethnicity Fri, 27 Mar 2015 19:28:20 +0000 Ellen Hinchcliffe 107193 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Juxtaposition’s DeAnna Cummings in Barcelona to study public markets http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/juxtaposition-s-deanna-cummings-barcelona-study-public-markets <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/27/juxtaposition-s-deanna-cummings-barcelona-study-public-markets" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/27/deanna.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Insight News </div> </div> </div> <p><span>This week, stakeholders from West Broadway Business and Area Coalition (WBC) and Juxtaposition Arts, two North Minneapolis organizations committed to developing public markets on the Northsid</span></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/27/juxtaposition-s-deanna-cummings-barcelona-study-public-markets"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span>This week, stakeholders from West Broadway Business and Area Coalition (WBC) and Juxtaposition Arts, two North Minneapolis organizations committed to developing public markets on the Northside, and 9th Ward City Council Member Alondra Cano will visit one of the world's greatest market cities for Project for Public Spaces' (PPS) 9th International Public Markets Conference, taking place Thursday, March 26-28, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span>The WBC and Juxtaposition (JXTA) became interested in attending the conference together due to the increasing success of the WBC's West Broadway Farmers Market, Holiday Pop Up Boutiques, and JXTA's growing campus and placemaking work. Mutual partners connected them with Council Member Cano, whose ward includes the Midtown Farmers Market; CM Cano and is very invested in strengthening the city of Minneapolis' funding and policy efforts to better support public market infrastructure and development.</span><br /><br /><span>"There is currently a boom of creative placemaking activities emanating from Minnesota and markets are one of the original forms of placemaking. We're excited for the opportunity of an immersive learning experience that we can share and build upon with our partners and colleagues locally," said DeAnna Cummings, Executive Director of Juxtaposition.</span><br /><br /><span>DeVon Nolen, manager of the West Broadway Farmers Market, said, "I look forward to sharing and learning some of the best practices around public markets internationally. Increasing access to public space is critical to our work in advancing toward growing a vibrant cosmopolitan city where all citizens are safe and welcomed!"</span><br /><br /><span>The conference includes two full days of speakers and workshops, as well as an entire day touring and learning about the inner workings of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pps.org/publicmarkets15/%20-%20tours">Barcelona's extraordinary markets</a>, led by experts from the Institut Municipal de Mercats de Barcelona (IMMB), operator of the city's remarkable market system.</span><br /><br /><span>"Locally, we have a demand for economic development projects that value the environment and empower underserved communities," said Ninth Ward Minneapolis City Council Member, Alondra Cano. "Globally, strong public market systems are effectively operating to meet these very demands and it's time for the city of Minneapolis to view public markets as a serious economic development strategy. I am looking forward to learning from other cities and countries attending this event and bringing a wealth of knowledge back to Minneapolis."</span><br /><br /><span>"Arguably the international model for a Market City," says PPS, Barcelona boasts 43 food and non-food public markets, many of which have recently undergone major renovation. The conference will focus on new trends and innovations for the preservation and revitalization of public markets internationally – from temporary open air markets to permanent market halls to 24/7 bustling market districts. Conference participants are traveling to Barcelona from over 40 countries and over 130 cities.</span><br /><br /><span>"It's exciting to see Minneapolis neighborhoods and communities joining the national and international conversation on urban issues and placemaking," said Kjersti Monson, Director of Long Range Planning for the City of Minneapolis. "Our city is a mosaic of assets and opportunities just waiting to be activated by strong local action and capacity. I look forward to hearing reports from the field as these ideas evolve!"</span><br /><br /><span>Upon returning from Barcelona, the group will schedule presentations and talk backs to share their learning with the Twin Cities' broader community of developers, artists, residents and others who have an interest in a Market Cities approach to development. Look to&nbsp;<a href="http://westbroadway.org/">westbroadway.org</a>&nbsp;for updates.</span><br /><br /><span>Want to go to Barcelona with the group?&nbsp;<strong>Follow the group's journey on Twitter</strong>, Instagram and Facebook by searching the conference hashtag&nbsp;<strong>#publicmarkets15</strong>&nbsp;and the Minneapolis group's hashtag&nbsp;<strong>#publicmarkets4mpls</strong>.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/juxtaposition-s-deanna-cummings-barcelona-study-public-markets#comments juxtaposition arts north minneapolis public markets Arts Local Jordan Fri, 27 Mar 2015 18:39:31 +0000 107191 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Hospital workers picket Allina hospitals, calling for safe staffing levels http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/hospital-workers-picket-allina-hospitals-calling-safe-staffing-levels <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/27/hospital-workers-picket-allina-hospitals-calling-safe-staffing-levels" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/27/seiu_pickets.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/steve-share" title="View user profile.">Steve Share</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Minneapolis Labor Review </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-location field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div class="views-field views-field-colorbox">&</div></div></div></div><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/27/hospital-workers-picket-allina-hospitals-calling-safe-staffing-levels"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="field field-name-field-location field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div class="views-field views-field-colorbox">&nbsp;</div><div class="views-field views-field-field-caption"><div class="field-content"><p>&nbsp;</p></div></div>Nearly 1,000 members of SEIU Healthcare Minnesota and supporters walked an informational picket line yesterday at Abbott-Northwestern Hospital, calling for safer staffing levels.&nbsp;“I’m here for our patients’ quality care as well as for health and safety for my co-workers,” said one of the picketers, Kalsang Dickey, Richfield, who has worked as a nursing assistant at Abbott Northwestern for 15 years.</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Contract negotiations are underway for about 3,000 hospital workers at Abbott-Northwestern and seven other hospitals owned by Allina Health: Buffalo, Mercy, Owatonna, St. Francis, United, Unity, and Phillips Eye Institute. The workers’ contract expired February 28.</p><p>“Allina has cut staff at every hospital in the last three years, but we are still working the same or more hours and it means we are constantly understaffed,” Dickey said. “It’s hard for us to take care of patients.”</p><p>Dickey works in the Mother Baby Center at Abbott-Northwestern and said sometimes only one nursing assistant is scheduled for the night shift. “If we have more nursing assistants, we can do a better job taking care of our patients’ needs.”</p><p><a href="http://www.seiuhealthcaremn.org/">SEIU Healthcare</a>&nbsp;members also raised concerns about Allina proposals to subcontract hospital jobs and the impact on workers and patients.</p><p>“If Allina executives subcontract hospital jobs like Dietary and Environmental Services to the lowest bidder, I think there will be higher turnover, less training, lower standards, and all of that will harm patient care,” warned Dawn Akkaya, SEIU Healthcare member who for 16 years has worked as nursing assistant and patient assistant coordinator at Abbott-Northwestern. “We want to work with Allina to invest in our healthcare workforce, not drive a race to the bottom.”</p><p>Pay is also an issue in the negotiations, said Dickey, who said she needs to take on extra shifts to make ends meet for her family with two wage-earners and three kids.</p><p>“This hospital is our second home,” Dickey said, and her co-workers are like brothers and sisters. “We are standing up for our rights. We want to make this family better,” she said, so that the hospital workers can provide quality care for patients.</p><p>Members of the Minnesota Nurses Association walked the along the informational picket-line with SEIU Healthcare members, including James Davies, RN, Minneapolis, who has worked 31 years at Abbott-Northwestern. “We’re here as MNA members to support our fellow union members at the hospital,” Davies said.</p><p>SEIU Healthcare also staged informational pickets on Thursday, March 26 from 2:00-5:00 p.m. at Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids and United Hospital in St. Paul in which another 1,000 workers and supporters participated.</p><div class="views-field views-field-colorbox"><span class="field-content"><a href="http://workdayminnesota.org/?width=700px&amp;height=80%25&amp;inline=true#colorbox-inline-2090691461" class="colorbox-inline init-colorbox-inline-processed cboxElement" rel="gallery-additional_media"><img src="http://workdayminnesota.org/sites/workdayminnesota.org/files/styles/scale-medium/public/media/articles/dickey_kalsang.jpg?itok=Q9jPWeYR" alt="" style="float: right;" /></a></span></div><div class="views-field views-field-field-caption"><div class="field-content"><p>[At right: Kalsang Dickey, Richfield, has worked 15 years as a nursing assistant at Abbott Northwestern Hospital. She is an SEIU Healthcare Minnesota union steward: "We are standing up for our rights."]</p><div><em>&nbsp;[See original article here:&nbsp;http://workdayminnesota.org/articles/hospital-workers-picket-allina-hospitals-calling-safe-staffing-levels]</em></div></div></div></div></div></div> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/hospital-workers-picket-allina-hospitals-calling-safe-staffing-levels#comments allina hospitals labor pickets SEIU Labor Downtown Health Fri, 27 Mar 2015 18:14:48 +0000 107190 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Hops for Hunger http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/hops-hunger <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/27/hops-hunger" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/27/screen_shot_2015-03-27_at_7.34.57_am.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>“We want to get into different types of fundraisers, not just pancake feeds and spaghetti dinners,” says Dave Rudolph, manager at the Southern Anoka County Assistance Food Shelf (SACA).</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/27/hops-hunger"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“We want to get into different types of fundraisers, not just pancake feeds and spaghetti dinners,” says Dave Rudolph, manager at the Southern Anoka County Assistance Food Shelf (SACA). With craft beer popular, what beer way than a local festival?</p><p>On Sat. March 28, SACA will host Hops for Hunger III, a beer tasting event with live music, catering, and a charitable bent. Sixteen Minnesota breweries will be pouring samples to guests, including Dangerous Man, HammerHeart, and Fair State.</p><p>It’s not just a chance for beer drinkers to sample some goods, though, the $35 tickets raise important funds and awareness for the hunger problems facing the local community. Hops for Hunger II raised $12,500 last year, and festivals 1 and 2 combined have bought about 175,000 pounds of food for the local food shelf.</p><p>“We’re seeing a lot more people coming to the food shelf even though the economy is getting better,” Rudolph says. “In 2013 we had over 4,700 families and over 12,000 individuals come over the course of the year. We gave out over 308,000 pounds of food. In 2014 we had over 6,000 families, over 16,000 individuals, and we gave out just under 450,000 pounds of food.”</p><p>For many, the food shelf offers a lifeline for keeping up with other expenses. For an individual earning between $8-14/hr, the food shelf offers an alternative to making that hard choice between buying food and staying in school, purchasing medication, or filling the gas tank to get to work. With the numbers of recipients rising, it gives increased importance to the awareness and fundraising that takes place at an event such as Hops for Hunger. “It really helps out a lot,” Rudolph says. Plus, “it’s some really good beer.”</p><p>With just 16 participating breweries and about 250 tickets for sale, the event is smaller than typical beer festivals and offers more of a community atomsphere where attendees can easily chat with the brewers. Hosted in the Solar Arts Building in Northeast Minneapolis, which also houses Indeed Brewing, Chowgirls Killer Catering (also at the event), and several artists, the space limits the scope of the event but helps to foster that intimate experience.</p><p>Additional sponsors include Financial One Credit Union, Shoulak Breast Fest, Kellor Williams (Veronia Jeminez – Realtor), Rapid Graphics, and Columbia Heights Athletic Boosters. Tickets can be purchased here.</p><p>Hops For Hunger III will feature Chowgirls Killer Catering, live music from Ash St. John &amp; the Family Groove and The Brandon Projekt, and the following breweries:</p><p>612Brew</p><p>Bad Weather Brewing</p><p>Barley John’s</p><p>Bauhaus Berw Labs</p><p>Bent Brewstillery</p><p>Boom Island Brewing</p><p>Dangerous Man</p><p>Excelsior Brewing</p><p>Fair State Brewing Co-op</p><p>HammerHeart</p><p>Indeed Brewing</p><p>Insight Brewing</p><p>Lucid</p><p>NorthGate</p><p>Sociable Cider Werks</p><p>Tin Whiskers Brewing</p><p>http://www.eventbrite.com/e/hops-for-hunger-iii-tickets-14985407758?aff=eventful%2Fr%2Feventful&amp;lid=edp&amp;source=edp&amp;spot=li</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/27/hops-hunger#comments #beer #craft beer #wine #food #festivals Daily Planet Originals Food and restaurants Lifestyle Fri, 27 Mar 2015 12:37:00 +0000 Loren Green 107180 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Wine, women and song with Tina Schlieske, Molly Maher and Katy Vernon http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/26/wine-women-and-song-tina-schlieske-molly-maher-and-katy-vernon <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2015/03/26/wine-women-and-song-tina-schlieske-molly-maher-and-katy-vernon" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/26/wine_women_song.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ann-treacy" title="View user profile.">Ann Treacy</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>What could bring a parochial St Paulite to Anoka? Wine, Women and Song at the <a href="http://www.lyricarts.org/" target="_blank">Lyric Arts</a>, a one-night celebration of Minnesota women singers featuring <a href="http://tinaschlieske.com/" target="_blank">Tina Schlieske</a>, <a href="http://mollymaher.com/" target="_blank">Molly Maher</a> and <a href="http://katyvernon.com/" target="_blank">Katy Vernon</a>.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2015/03/26/wine-women-and-song-tina-schlieske-molly-maher-and-katy-vernon"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What could bring a parochial St Paulite to Anoka? Wine, Women and Song at the <a href="http://www.lyricarts.org/" target="_blank">Lyric Arts</a>, a one-night celebration of Minnesota women singers featuring <a href="http://tinaschlieske.com/" target="_blank">Tina Schlieske</a>, <a href="http://mollymaher.com/" target="_blank">Molly Maher</a> and <a href="http://katyvernon.com/" target="_blank">Katy Vernon</a>.<!--break--></p><p>Although wine and beer are served, the Lyric Arts is a theater, not a bar. It seats about 230, creating an intimate atmosphere where the music is the singular focus for the audience. Each of the artists noted that it was a unique opportunity for them hear the music in such a concentrated mode –in front of a warm (but real) audience – say as compared to playing for a toddler and a dog as Vernon noted she had also done.</p><p>I had not seen Tina Schlieske live since she fronted Tina and the B-Sides. She shared through music and stories her life before, during and after life with the B-Sides. It was interesting to learn so much about her and the songs. She sang for an hour, including new and old songs, such as <em>Barricade</em>, which is a nice showcase for her voice, which is both raspy and clear and very controlled.</p><p>I especially enjoyed <em>Hustlin’ Woman Blues</em>, originally sung by Memphis Minnie, from Schlieske’s Evil Gal Blues album, an homage to blues women. It’s a down and dirty southern blues song and Schlieske belts it out as the song deserves. As an encore, she ended with <em>Big Sky</em>, which was a loudly and lovingly requested and enjoyed by the audience.</p><p>Molly Maher brought a country twang and herd of guitars to the show. I see Maher every month at Real Phonic Radio, but she rarely performs there. So this was a great treat. She played with Erik Koskinen. They obviously have an easy history that makes even the new songs feel comfortable to the audience. Maher has a nice, surprisingly low voice and she has a very entertaining stage presence but it’s really her guitar-playing that shines. She plays country songs like you listened to as a kid in the backseat of a road trip and like Keat’s negative capabilities, there’s a lot to understand in the heavy pauses in a song like <em>On Your Way Out</em>. Then there are also songs with no pauses like <em>Monkey with a Tambourine</em> that’s just a lot more pure story with dance potential.</p><p>Katy Vernon began the night with her ukulele, red party dress and London accent. Before I make this comparison, I feel like I have to say that I lived in London for years, so it’s not just the accent, but in just a few songs (like <em>Five O’Clock</em>) she was like a less poppy Lily Allen. But there was the same wit in a line like “five o’clock somewhere comes earlier every day” a line most mothers get. Vernon does seem to bridge a folksy country sound to pop sensibility.</p><p>The night was part of a Music in the ‘Burbs series, which continues next month (April 10) with Martin Zellar. Events like that might not be enough to get me to move to the suburbs, but it does show me another perk, which I’ll add to attached garages and proper stand-up showers.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2015 Ann Treacy </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2015/03/26/wine-women-and-song-tina-schlieske-molly-maher-and-katy-vernon#comments Arts Entertainment Music Daily Planet Originals Thu, 26 Mar 2015 22:44:47 +0000 107169 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net Happy 30th anniversary, Minnesota Women's Press! http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/26/happy-30th-anniversary-minnesota-womens-press <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2015/03/26/happy-30th-anniversary-minnesota-womens-press" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/15/26/4745a.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Minnesota Women’s Press </div> </div> </div> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: ARIAL, 'SANS SERIF'; font-size: x-small;">"What if women were in charge of public words and the news? What if our voices were being heard?"&nbsp;</span></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/26/happy-30th-anniversary-minnesota-womens-press"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: ARIAL, 'SANS SERIF'; font-size: x-small;">"What if women were in charge of public words and the news? What if our voices were being heard?"&nbsp;<br /><br />These questions became the impetus for a women's newspaper when it was just a dream in the head of Mollie Hoben in 1983. At the time, she was on leave from her job as a teacher of vision-impaired students. She was working as editor of the Park Bugle, a community newspaper in St. Paul, and was taking classes in feminist studies in literature at the University of Minnesota. This mix made the timing just right for a conversation one sunny afternoon with her friend Glenda Martin.&nbsp;<br /><br />"I remember it so clearly," Martin says. When Hoben said she had been exploring the question of "what news would look like through women's eyes,'" Martin recalls pausing to feel the strength of the question, and then replying, "Well, let's find out."&nbsp;<br /><br />The times were right for such an endeavor, Hoben says of the mid-1980s. There were other feminist newspapers in the country, and a lot was going on in Minnesota with women's activism. Martin's career was in education administration, a male-dominated field. "All of my colleagues were men, even though my students and staff were primarily female."&nbsp;<br /><br /><strong>Before the launch</strong>&nbsp;<br /><br />The two gathered a small group of women who for a year researched organizational and business structures, media design, distribution systems and funding models to determine how to launch the publication. On April 15, 1985, the first issue of the every-other-week, tabloid-sized newspaper hit the streets.&nbsp;<br /><br />A key decision was to be a for-profit business. "That was unusual at the time for a women's organization," Hoben says.&nbsp;<br /><br />"I was so committed to the for-profit idea," Martin says. "It was important that we make a statement that women could create a business based on women's words and make it work." Although it took many years for the struggling young business to reach profitability, "I still think it was the right decision," she says.&nbsp;<br /><br />The business was launched as a subchapter S corporation, with some 30 women and a few men investing as shareholders, making a statement about their belief in the value of women's words, ideas and stories.&nbsp;<br /><br />"At the time many did not think it was possible," Hoben says. More than one critical adviser told them they wouldn't last a year.&nbsp;<br /><br />"Our mission has not changed from the beginning," Hoben continues, "to honor, promote and spread women's words and ideas. Our work has always been based on creating a sense of community among readers, in ways that encourage change. The mission still drives what we do every day," she says.&nbsp;<br /></span></p><p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: ARIAL, 'SANS SERIF'; font-size: x-small;">"One of our key undertakings was to give women a platform, a forum to say their own words. In the Women's Press, women tell the stories, women make the images through photos and art. There is not an intermediary of male's eyes. Women own their words and language, and that's important," Hoben says.&nbsp;<br /><br />For 29 years, MWP has also hosted women's book groups - gatherings of women to read women's words. "What women discover about themselves because they read women's words is absolutely amazing," Martin says. "The Press has done that in print, and we do that in the book groups, too."&nbsp;<br /><br />Over the years, the company's Center for Feminist Reading, led by Hoben and Martin, has expanded to include book trips and reading retreats, and has compiled a list of more than 500 "Great Books" by women authors - chosen by MWP book group members as the books that have most inspired, challenged, intrigued and evoked strong response and discussion.&nbsp;<br /><br /><strong>At 30 years</strong>&nbsp;<br /><br />"A lot has changed for women, between 1985 and now," Hoben says. "But it's a mixed picture. There have been changes for the good - women do have more power and visibility. Yet as we know from the topics we still write about - violence against women, the pay gap, etc. - a lot hasn't changed. We still live in a patriarchal system that does not recognize and honor women as it should. Women are fighting for many of the same things as 30 years ago. There's a lot yet to do."&nbsp;<br /><br />The Women's Press has evolved over time. Early in the emerging online technology world, MWP's website was launched. In 1996, Hoben and Martin turned the leadership over to Magnuson and Olson, and in 2009, in the midst of the economic recession, and after nearly 25 years as a biweekly, mostly black-and-white tabloid newspaper, they transformed the publication into a monthly, full-color magazine.&nbsp;<br /><br />"One of the reasons we are still around and a valuable model is our ability to evolve and change, to learn and grow as the times and the world have changed," Hoben says. "When I think back to when we started, we were seen as far out, scary and crazy," she says of MWP's feminist-based beginnings.&nbsp;<br /><br />"As I look at the Women's Press now, I think it is so strong and positive, still feminist - readers get something very different than from a lot of women's magazines. Hopefully, readers find something richer for themselves," Martin says.&nbsp;<br /><br />"Our feminism is more than an 'equal rights feminism,'" says Hoben. "Our definitions - we have always found that there are many definitions of feminism - have tended to be more about changing the basic values of society and of the individual women and men in it. Our feminism is rich and complex, a sophisticated way of looking at the world and what we want to see changed and how to go at it."&nbsp;<br /><br />Now, at 30 years, we still believe that every woman has a story and that women's words have value and need to be heard.&nbsp;</span></p><p><em><span style="color: #000000; font-family: ARIAL, 'SANS SERIF'; font-size: xx-small;">[See original piece here:&nbsp;http://www.womenspress.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&amp;SubSectionID=233&amp;ArticleID=4745]</span></em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/26/happy-30th-anniversary-minnesota-womens-press#comments gender history women's press Downtown Gender/GLBT Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:36:09 +0000 Norma Smith Olson and Kathy Magnuson 107166 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net La Huasteca: you think you know Mexican street food? http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/26/la-huasteca-you-think-you-know-mexican-street-food <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jeremy-iggers" title="View user profile.">Jeremy Iggers</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Iggers Digest </div> </div> </div> <p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2015/March/la_huasteca_sign.jpg" alt="La Huasteca" style="float: right;" width="200" height="266" />You think you know Mexican cuisine?</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2015/03/26/la-huasteca-you-think-you-know-mexican-street-food"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2015/March/la_huasteca_sign.jpg" alt="La Huasteca" style="float: right;" width="200" height="266" />You think you know Mexican cuisine?</p><p>Okay, everybody has heard of tacos and tamales. But what about tacos de canasta? &nbsp;Or tacos al vapor? Or tacos Oaxaquenos? Or barbacoa de chivo? Or birria de cordero? Or Dori'locos.</p><p>They are all on the menu at La Huasteca, a friendly little Mexican diner and take-out on Eat Street.&nbsp;</p><p>Tacos al canasta - basket tacos - are a kind of tacos sold by street vendors, who traditionally peddle them on bicycles. Unlike traditional tacos, which are made to order, these are prepared in advance, and kept in a big covered pot that holds their heat. At La Huasteca, the fillings include chicharron prenzado (pressed pork rind), chicken with red chile sauce, and chorizo (all $2).&nbsp;</p><p>Tacos al vapor literally means steamed tacos; at La Huasteca, these are filled with a choice of tender slow-cooked cow's head or cow cheeks meat.&nbsp;</p><p>Barbacoa is a taqueria staple, and local versions are usually prepared with beef. La Huasteca's version ($10 with rice, beans and tacos) &nbsp;is made with chivo (goat), slow-cooked and very tender. Birria Veracruz style, ($11) is less common locally - a similar but spicier preparation, made from lamb (or more likely, mutton).</p><p>Tamales Oaxaquenos ($3), from the state of Oaxaca, are close relatives of the traditional tamales served elsewhere in Mexico, except that the filling of corn meal wrapped stuffed with meat, cheese or vegetables is wrapped in a banana leaf instead of a corn husk.</p><p>These are all very traditional dishes, but La Huasteca also offers one of the trendiest new street food snacks from Mexico City - the Dori'loco. It's the south of the border cousin of the&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frito_pie" data-blogger-escaped-target="_blank">Frito Pie</a>, a pile of Doritos (invented in the USA) topped with diced mango, pineapple, carrot, cucumber and a couple of different kinds of hot sauce. &nbsp;It was a bit tart and spicy for my taste, but definitely a novel taste experience.&nbsp;</p><p>Chicharrones a la Mexicana ($5) are a snack food served on a sheet of fried chicharron (pork rind), topped with refried beans, lettuce, avocado, queso fresco and cueron de puerco (loosely translated as pickled pig skin. Interesting, but I don't think I will order that one again.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2015/03/26/la-huasteca-you-think-you-know-mexican-street-food#comments La Huasteca Mexican street food Food and restaurants Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:06:49 +0000 107165 at http://www.tcdailyplanet.net