Twin Cities Daily Planet | Latest Headlines https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/columnists en Media forum: Finding voice beyond the dominant https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/media-forum-finding-voice-beyond-dominant <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/26/media-forum-finding-voice-beyond-dominant" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/mediaforum1.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> North News </div> </div> </div> <p>The importance, and the difficulty, of gaining a voice to tell one’s own story was the underlying theme of the annual Twin Cities Media Alliance Fall Forum Nov. 8. The forum’s keynote speaker, Nekima Levy-Pounds, expressed concern that minorities, especially African-American men, are portrayed in only one dimension in the local media, and are seldom the authors of their own narratives.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/media-forum-finding-voice-beyond-dominant"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The importance, and the difficulty, of gaining a voice to tell one’s own story was the underlying theme of the annual Twin Cities Media Alliance Fall Forum Nov. 8. The forum’s keynote speaker, Nekima Levy-Pounds, expressed concern that minorities, especially African-American men, are portrayed in only one dimension in the local media, and are seldom the authors of their own narratives.<!--break--></p><p>Levy-Pounds, Professor of law at St Thomas University, told the audience at the early November event that television, print and online news play a huge role in how people of color are seen, and that role is often not a benign one. She noted that most news stories about minority men describe either athletes or those in contact with the criminal justice system, and that “negative perceptions of young black men influence laws and policies.” She also stressed that “the African-American community in the Twin Cities is not monolithic, and we deserve to be heard in all our differences.”</p><blockquote><p><strong>Watch video</strong> from the D<a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/node/103655">aily Planet's Fall Media Forum</a>.</p></blockquote><p>Levy-Pounds referred to the recent KSTP story in which Minneapolis mayor Betsy Hodges was allegedly “flashing gang signs” during a videotaping of an encounter with a young man registering voters in North Minneapolis as an example of media-driven misconceptions. She called the story “appalling” and said it was “a false narrative about the Mayor and the young African American man standing beside her in the photo. For white Minnesotans who do not personally know any young African American men, it is all too easy to take the media’s word as absolute truth and embrace the negative racial stereotypes that are being perpetuated about the young man in the photo.”</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/mediaforum2.png" width="275" height="195" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Levy-Pounds <em>(right) </em>told the audience that, referring to the traditional media, she “will not accept the dominant narrative,” and urged writers to work to make their own “narratives” available to the wider world. She also suggested they ask themselves “Have I asked for a perspective, and not just a quote?”</p><p>In addition to being a professor and an attorney, Ms. Levy-Pounds was a founding member of Black Advocates for Education, and is the director of the Community Justice Project, a civil rights legal clinic.</p><p>After Nekima Levy-Pounds spoke, there was a five member panel, and each member described her or his perspective on writing alternative narratives.</p><p>Cirien Saadeh, a TCMA board member, convened the meeting at the U of M Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center, 2001 Plymouth Ave., Minneapolis. She told the approximately 80 people attending: “It takes a village like TC Media Alliance and a platform like the TC Daily Planet to bring people together for this meeting’s theme of communicating for impact.”</p><p>Aida Al Kadi, a TC Daily Planet writing intern since last August, described writing her first story, about her mistreatment by the St. Paul Police after an arrest for an auto insurance infraction. She also talked about her immigrant parents’ difficulties with assimilation into the United States.</p><p><em><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/mediaforum3.png" width="167" height="110" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Left, moderator: Lissa Jones – Minnesota African American Museum and Cultural Center; host of “Urban Agenda” on KMOJ; interim executive director of Sabathani Community Center.</em></p><p>Shaina Brassard, Marketing &amp; Communications Coordinator, West Broadway Business and Area Coalition and partner, One Minneapolis project) spoke about the success of the 9th annual FLOW North Side Arts Crawl (July 25 and 26). 200 North Side artists were involved, and over 5000 people attended. Brassard noted that “Northsiders have to tell their own stories, and art is one way to do it.”</p><p>In breakout sessions, John Capecci, Capecci Communications presented “Telling your story to Make a difference: Navigating the Space between Private and Public.” He advised: “The best communications are audience-centered.”</p><p>He asked people to think, “What are the qualities that make a good story? What is a well-told advocacy story? Has someone told you a story that caused you to act?”</p><p>“Personal appearance gives a story great verisimilitude.”</p><p>Ricardo Levins Morales presented “Art and Storytelling for Social Change.”</p><p>He was a member of Northland Poster Cooperative (closed 2009); Art for Social Justice; Born in Puerto Rico. He advised:</p><blockquote><p>“Don’t direct your message to where people are at now; direct it to what people hunger for.” Example: The Montgomery Bus Boycott did not happen spontaneously – activists knew “where to put the needle at the point of greatest pressure.”</p><p>“We live in a blizzard of lies – the cover stories are wearing thin. People are hungry for truth – We can no longer ignore what we have been ignoring, just to function. What is the drumbeat that we can synchronize ourselves to? We can’t comfortably exist with truth and lies.”</p></blockquote> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 North News </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/media-forum-finding-voice-beyond-dominant#comments #FallMediaForum #FMF14 Media north minneapolis Twin Cities Daily Planet Twin Cities Media Alliance Communities Wed, 26 Nov 2014 22:22:56 +0000 Mark Allan Peterson 104081 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net VIDEO - Ferguson reaction in Minneapolis: Intense, peaceful, diverse crowd protests https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/video-ferguson-reaction-minneapolis-intense-peaceful-diverse-crowd-protests <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/26/video-ferguson-reaction-minneapolis-intense-peaceful-diverse-crowd-protests" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/mplsdemo1.png" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/bsorem" title="View user profile.">Bill Sorem</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Uptake </div> </div> </div> <p>More than 300 solemn demonstrators rallied in front of a Minneapolis Police station on Tuesday to protest the refusal of a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri, to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the the killing of Michael Brown, a black teen.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/video-ferguson-reaction-minneapolis-intense-peaceful-diverse-crowd-protests"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>More than 300 solemn demonstrators rallied in front of a Minneapolis Police station on Tuesday to protest the refusal of a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri, to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the the killing of Michael Brown, a black teen.<!--break--></p><p>“Michael Brown! Michael Brown! Michael Brown!” chanted the crowd in unison.</p><p>“Grand Jury — Phony Way To Clear Killer Cop” read one of the handmade signs.</p><p>“Black Lives Matter” read several signs. “All Lives Matter” read another.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Read more</strong> TC Daily Planet coverage of <a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/tags/police-misconduct">police misconduct issues</a>.</p></blockquote><p>The police action has produced sharp reactions from the Missouri community, the nation and the federal government. After the grand jury decision was announced Monday night, President Obama met with the White House Press asking for non-violent actions.</p><p><iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/CzPF6KOqAE0" frameborder="0" height="350" width="425"></iframe></p><p><em>Protest outside of Minneapolis 3rd precinct police office</em></p><p>“Being here in solidarity with your community is an appropriate response,” said a woman holding a “Stand on the side of Love” sign. “I’m concerned about what is going to happen. Non-violence is the way to go, but we need to stand with our community because we’re on the side of love and that’s where we have to be.”</p><p>The very diverse group in Minneapolis — at the intersection of Minnehaha and Lake Street, in front of the Minneapolis Police Precinct 3 office — was loud, intensely angry but mostly very orderly. They did block the intersection and one young woman was slightly injured in an encounter with an automobile going through the intersection. There were no police officers in evidence in the immediate proximity of the crowd, but squad cars blocked intersections in the surrounding area.</p><p><strong>Crowd reflects the face of America</strong></p><p>The rally included a wide range of ages and racial groups. Many young children accompanied their parents. It was the face of America.</p><p>A caucasian woman held a folder with the words “My grandsons’ lives matter”. “They’re African-American and I worry about them every day,” she explained. “One just started college, a 14-year-old and a 12-year-old. I don’t know if they understand the reality of what could happen. I do.”</p><p>“Wake Up — Racism Still Exists” read one sign held high above the crowd.</p><p>“The Fundamental Danger Of A Non-Indictment Is Not More Riots. It Is More Darren Wilsons”, read another sign.</p><p>“We’re going to take it to the streets here and get our voices out,” said a woman bundled up against the late fall cold. “And maybe our goal here is to get some body cams on the police that really need it instead of the ones that volunteer.” Minneapolis just started testing body cams on police, devices that can provide a definitive video record of what police do. The idea is to provide more police accountability and also shield officers from groundless accusations. Thirty-six officers volunteered to wear the recording devices, but they are not mandatory and police decide when to turn them on or off.</p><p>Helicopters buzzed overhead as the twilight gave way to night. A food truck parked behind the police station was passing out free food, including grilled cheese sandwiches.</p><p><em><iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/vg1" frameborder="0" height="350" width="425"></iframe></em></p><p><em><em>Protests along University Avenue in St. Paul</em></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 The Uptake </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/video-ferguson-reaction-minneapolis-intense-peaceful-diverse-crowd-protests#comments #Ferguson Michael Brown Mike Brown police misconduct Public Safety Race/Ethnicity Wed, 26 Nov 2014 21:26:48 +0000 104071 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net A long and winding path to the law for one Minneapolis immigration attorney https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/long-and-winding-path-law-one-minneapolis-immigration-attorney <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/26/long-and-winding-path-law-one-minneapolis-immigration-attorney" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/abdinasirabdulahi200.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ibrahim-hirsi" title="View user profile.">Ibrahim Hirsi</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> MinnPost </div> </div> </div> <p>Abdinasir Abdulahi is now an established immigration attorney, with his Minneapolis law firm, <a href="http://amalawoffice.com/" target="_blank">Abdinasir M. Abdulahi, LLC</a>, having become a destination for thousands of East African immigrant clients throughout Minnesota and other states.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/long-and-winding-path-law-one-minneapolis-immigration-attorney"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Abdinasir Abdulahi is now an established immigration attorney, with his Minneapolis law firm, <a href="http://amalawoffice.com/" target="_blank">Abdinasir M. Abdulahi, LLC</a>, having become a destination for thousands of East African immigrant clients throughout Minnesota and other states.<!--break--></p><p>“People feel comfortable coming to me with questions that they wouldn’t necessarily bring up to other lawyers,” he said. “That’s because they don’t know the legal system, and they need someone they can relate to, someone they can trust.”</p><p>Over the past four years, Abdulahi has earned the trust of many Minnesotans from East Africa through his various legal services. But his path to that success was anything but easy.</p><p><strong>A reluctant lawyer</strong></p><p>Abdulahi was born and raised in Kalafo, Ethiopia, part of a region that has long been the source of conflict between Somalia and Ethiopia. Coming of age in this small border town, some of those conflicts unfolded before his eyes.</p><p>Yet despite growing up amid political conflicts and never-ending tensions between the two countries, Abdulahi was always hungry for success. Initially, he was interested in becoming an economist, but the scores he got from the national university placement exam didn’t qualify him to study the subject. “It’s not like here where you plan your own field of education,” he said. “In Ethiopia, you sit for a national test, and then based on the grades you get, you could end up in any field, whether you like it or not.”</p><table style="width: 213px; height: 198px; background-color: #f5f5f5;" align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5"><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Community Sketchbook</strong> focuses on the economic and social challenges facing communities, especially low-income communities and communities of color, and how people are trying to address them. It is made possible by sponsorship support from The Minneapolis Foundation. Community Sketchbook articles may be republished or distributed, in print or online, with credit to MinnPost and the foundation.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>So law it was. At first, Abdulahi wasn’t happy with studying the field. But it only took him a few courses before he started to develop a deep interest.</p><p>After graduating from law school in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, when he was in his 20s, Abdulahi was appointed to become judge of a Kalafo court. Four months later, he was promoted to the region’s chief justice of the state.</p><p><strong>Coming to Minnesota </strong></p><p>Abdulahi wasn’t the chief justice he wished to be, however. Government officials gave him orders on how to handle cases — orders he had to follow or face harsh consequences. “I was the chief of justice of the entire state,” he said. “I had the same power as the governor, but I could barely do anything. I wasn’t independent.”</p><p>So Abdulahi decided to pursue opportunities elsewhere. He had enjoyed the legal service and courtrooms. But he also wanted to do what he felt was the right thing — he hated to answer to government officials and base his decisions on their will.</p><p>In 2001, an opportunity presented itself: The Ethiopian government sent Abdulahi to the United States for a law seminar. He would be among judges and prosecutors from more than 20 countries around the world.</p><p>When he landed in the United States, though, Abdulahi didn’t go to the conference. He requested asylum.</p><p><strong>A challenging transition </strong></p><p>Six months after his arrival in the United States, Abdulahi was granted asylum. He delighted to have been granted the protection, but the transition process was a challenge. “It was really difficult,” he said. “One day you’re an official of a state. And the next day, you’re trying to find where to live and what to do. You don’t even know how to find your way around.”</p><p>Despite his experience in the law field, Abdulahi ended up working at Wells Fargo, where he did filing and other miscellaneous duties. He split his paycheck between himself and his family in Africa. “Life was tough at the time,” Abdulahi said. “But at least, I was happy mentally and emotionally.”</p><p>One thing was clear to Abdulahi: facing shelves and files every morning wasn’t something he wanted to do forever. And since his law degree from Addis Ababa and experience couldn’t translate into a decent job in Minnesota, he knew he had to go back to school.</p><p>So in 2002, Abdulahi attended the University of Minnesota Law School, completing a yearlong Master of Laws program. A year later, he transferred to William Mitchell College of Law so that he could work and go to law school full-time.</p><p>Abdulahi graduated from law school in 2009. A year later, after passing the bar exam, he opened his own law firm.</p><p>Four years later, AMA stands on Franklin Avenue and 11th Street, and its three attorneys serve thousands of people — mostly immigrants — throughout Minnesota and other states.</p><p>Abdulahi is one of a few people in the East African community who are practicing attorneys, an example of success and inspiration. But when Abdulahi goes to some courts to represent clients, judges don’t often recognize him as a lawyer, he said. “Somalis or even other [minority groups] were not used to being attorneys,” Abdulahi said. “They would ask me, ‘Are you the interpreter?’”</p><p>Despite such remarks, Abdulahi keeps a positive attitude, which he said has contributed to his success. “We’re blessed in America and also in the state of Minnesota,” he said. “It’s no accident that a lot of Somalis are here; a lot of East Africans are here.”</p><p>“This country offers many opportunities,” he said. “I’m a lawyer now. I was blessed to be a member of the Bar, which is highly regulated. My peers and other members of the Bar were really helpful. Without them, I wouldn’t do it. There are people who would disappoint you. But there are many others who would accept and support of you.”<em> </em></p><p><em>Ibrahim Hirsi can be reached at </em><span class="spamspan"><span class="u">ihirsi</span> [at] <span class="d">minnpost [dot] com</span><span class="t"> (<em><span class="spamspan"><span class="u">ihirsi</span> [at] <span class="d">minnpost [dot] com</span></span></em>)</span></span><em>. Follow him on Twitter at </em><a href="https://twitter.com/"><em>@IHirsi</em></a><em>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 MinnPost </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/long-and-winding-path-law-one-minneapolis-immigration-attorney#comments Global/Local Immigrants Wed, 26 Nov 2014 20:46:01 +0000 104070 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net Heads up Twin Cities, Plaid is the new Black Friday https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/heads-twin-cities-plaid-new-black-friday <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/26/heads-twin-cities-plaid-new-black-friday" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/dsc03916.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/skennelly" title="View user profile.">SKennelly</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>You can hear from the songs on the radio, the ads in the newspaper, and the commercials on TV that the holiday season has begun. This week Cyber Monday and Black Friday will have consumers opening up their wallets to grab the perfect present for their loved ones.</p><p></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/heads-twin-cities-plaid-new-black-friday"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>You can hear from the songs on the radio, the ads in the newspaper, and the commercials on TV that the holiday season has begun. This week Cyber Monday and Black Friday will have consumers opening up their wallets to grab the perfect present for their loved ones.</p><p><!--break--></p><p>According to USA Today, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/12/01/black-friday-shopping-results/3795867/">an estimated $12.3 billion in sales were brought in last Black Friday and Thanksgiving weekend</a>. But with store hours expanding and merchandise prices dropping, local small businesses have a hard time competing against large retailers.</p><p>In order to keep up with the competition, local businesses have used this week’s hype to shop as a means of promotion. This weekend, local business owners in the Twin Cities will be celebrating <a href="http://plaidfriday.com/">Plaid Friday</a> and <a href="https://www.americanexpress.com/us/small-business/shop-small/">Small Business Saturday</a>.</p><p>Originally started in Oakland California in 2010, Plaid Friday encourages customers to wear plaid and shop at their local business rather than big box retailers. On Nov. 28, the movement will be coming for the first time to the Twin Cities. Small Business Saturday encourages people to shop the Saturday after Thanksgiving in order to support local business and to start a new holiday shopping tradition.</p><p>“Plaid Friday is a national network of local, independent businesses joining together to encourage their communities to support small retail stores while holiday shopping,” said Leslie Ostrander, the store manager at Egg Plant Urban Farm Supply. “By promoting each other we can create a strong community of independent shops that celebrates the creativity and diversity of local, independent businesses in St. Paul and Minneapolis.”</p><p>Ostrander helped to create&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/plaidfridaytwincities">a Facebook page last month</a> and reached out to the Metro Independent Business Alliance to help promote the event, she said. There are so many diverse local businesses, she said, but many do not have the budget for advertising to be able to compete with larger, national chains.</p><p>“If we [local shops] join together we can share our audiences to let our communities know what wonderful stores and services are just a few miles away,” she said.</p><p>Teeny Bee Boutique owner Kristie Case said she will be participating in both Plaid Friday and Small Business Saturday this weekend. She said she plans to give an additional five percent discount to customers who wear plaid on Friday, as well as hold a store wide sale on Saturday.</p><p>“Every dollar you spend at a small business benefits and go’s back into the community,” Case said. “Shopping at a small business feeds into the vitality of the community.”</p><p>Case said she hopes that customers receive a more personal and intimate experience while at her store compared to her cooperate competition. “Shopping should be an investment,” she said.</p><p>Cathy Christensen, an Independent Consultant with Scentsy and co-owner of Electric Entertainment, said she wants to showcase the unique products small business make that can’t be found at name brand stores.</p><p>Christensen said on Saturday she will be hosting a sale at the Wellstone Community Center. “This day is set aside for us to let people know that they can shop small and still get great gifts for Christmas,” she said.&nbsp; “By shopping small they are supporting a family to have the ability to stay at home to have time with their families.”</p><p>Christensen said small business Saturday means having her small business help the community as well. During Saturday’s event, she said, she will be collecting non-perishables and will have gifts ready for purchase to be donated to the St. Paul nonprofit Neighborhood House. “[Neighborhood House’s] dedication to helping immigrants has impressed me and compelled me to help them in some way,” she said.</p><p>Just Truffles president Kathleen O’Hehir-Johnson said five percent of her sales to go to food shelves year round. “We are companies that do good not just to our customers, but to the community,” she said.</p><p>Just Truffles has been in business for 28 years. The company began at the St. Paul Hotel, and has relocated twice on Grand Avenue. “If I have a choice, I go to a small shop,” said O’Hehir-Johnson. “Its mechanical compared to locally handmade.”</p><p>For O’Hehir-Johnson, shopping at local businesses means having the ability to know the store. And she said that she is glad that with the emergence of Plaid Friday and Small business Saturday, people are acknowledging that shopping small can be an everyday activity rather than a holiday activity.</p><p>“Everyone has to start small, even Macy’s,” she said. “Shopping should be a treasure hunt rather than an expedition.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p><em>This story was written by a Twin Cities Daily Planet intern for the TCDP college internship program.&nbsp;<em>This is one of a number of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/interns-and-students">articles produced by student interns</a>&nbsp;at the TC Daily Planet. Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative.</em></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Sabrina Kennelly </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/heads-twin-cities-plaid-new-black-friday#comments Black Friday Business CC area Plaid Friday small business saturday St. Paul Economy Daily Planet Originals Local Minnesota Work & Economy Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:28:28 +0000 104053 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net THEATER REVIEW | "Buddy—The Buddy Holly Story" at highlights the singer's musical inspiration at History Theatre https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-buddy-holly-story-history-theatre-st-paul <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-buddy-holly-story-history-theatre-st-paul" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/buddy428_1.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/bevwolfe" title="View user profile.">bevwolfe</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">I missed the first two times that </span><em style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">Buddy—The Buddy Holly Story</em><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;"> played at History Theatre, but I had heard it was a lot of fun. &nbsp;On its third go-round, I made a point to finally catch it and I can confirm that this show is great fun. History Theatre is co-producing this Alan Jane’s play with the McNally Smith College of Music. Director Ron Peluso and musical director Gary Rue provide an entertaining production that seeks more to recreate the early excitement of rock and roll rather than to simply tell a rock biopic.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">&nbsp;</span></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-buddy-holly-story-history-theatre-st-paul"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">I missed the first two times that </span><em style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">Buddy—The Buddy Holly Story</em><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;"> played at History Theatre, but I had heard it was a lot of fun. &nbsp;On its third go-round, I made a point to finally catch it and I can confirm that this show is great fun. History Theatre is co-producing this Alan Jane’s play with the McNally Smith College of Music. Director Ron Peluso and musical director Gary Rue provide an entertaining production that seeks more to recreate the early excitement of rock and roll rather than to simply tell a rock biopic.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 16.7999992370605px;">&nbsp;<!--break--></span></p><p>Buddy Holly was a country singer who in 1956, at the age of 19, switched to rock music with his own original compositions. He succeeded in exciting a generation with his music. He shot to stardom rapidly and he had a series of hit songs before his career and life was cut short by a plane crash. Along the way, he challenged the limited thinking of record producers, had a falling out with his original band, The Crickets, and married. The best moments in the show are when the cast plays full-length versions of Holly’s songs. Although I have always been aware of Holly’s songs, hearing them performed in this production provides a new appreciation and understanding on how Holly’s music directly influenced other artists, including the Beatles.</p><p>Nicholas Freeman, a talented singer and musician, succeeds in capturing the essence of Holly in the musical numbers. He is joined on stage by other remarkable musicians as his band members, including Ryan Janssen and Zac Spicer.&nbsp; Most of the action in the play centers around two performances given by Holly. The cast makes great efforts to transform the show’s audience into the audiences for these two famous performances.</p><p>The first performance involves Holly and his band’s concert as the first white group to play at the famous Apollo Theatre in Harlem. Although Holly’s songs are impressive, the highlight of the show was the energetic musical number “Shout” performed by Lynnea Monique Doublette and Munyaradzi Tirivep. The second performance was Holly’s final concert at a ballroom in Clearwater, Iowa, just before the fatal crash. Holly shares the stage with two other musical legends who died with him in the crash: J.P. Richardson (“The Big Bopper) and Ritchie Valens. Both Brant Miller as the Big Bopper and Allen P. Malicsi as Valens make the most of their time performing. This show’s emphasis on this nostalgic music delighted the opening night audience. &nbsp;</p><p>A highlight at the beginning of the show was a soloist singing the first verse and chorus from the Don McLean’s song “American Pie,” a song that characterizes the death of Buddy Holly as “the day the music died.” It was a bittersweet opening and my only disappointment was that it was not reprised at the end when Holly’s death is announced.</p><p>Real life history interjected itself on opening night with the presence of another legendary performer, Bobby Vee. Vee had a string of musical hit songs in the 1960s. Ironically, when Holly’s plane crashed, he was on his way to play a concert in Moorhead, Minnesota. Vee was an unknown 15-year-old singer and his band had the difficult task of subbing for Holly that fateful night.</p><hr /><p><em>Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2014 Bev Wolfe </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-relatedevent"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/events/buddy-buddy-holly-story-history-theatre">&quot;Buddy — The Buddy Holly Story&quot; at History Theatre</a> </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-buddy-holly-story-history-theatre-st-paul#comments CC area Arts Entertainment Theater Daily Planet Originals Wed, 26 Nov 2014 18:35:38 +0000 104050 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net Same-sex marriage could increase Minnesota's annual economy by $38 M https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/same-sex-marriage-could-increase-minnesota-s-annual-economy-38-m <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/26/same-sex-marriage-could-increase-minnesota-s-annual-economy-38-m" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/weddings_by_heidi_garrido_4.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/jonas-warlich" title="View user profile.">Jonas Warlich</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>Since same-sex marriage became legal in Minnesota, Heidi Garrido has shot for more than a dozen same-sex weddings. The St. Paul photographer said she’s already seen a major increase in her profits since the state legalized same-sex marriage last summer.</p><p></p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/same-sex-marriage-could-increase-minnesota-s-annual-economy-38-m"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Since same-sex marriage became legal in Minnesota, Heidi Garrido has shot for more than a dozen same-sex weddings. The St. Paul photographer said she’s already seen a major increase in her profits since the state legalized same-sex marriage last summer.</p><p><!--break--></p><p>And Garrido isn’t the only one that thinks the wedding industry is going to see a major uptick from the ruling. According to <a href="http://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/cities/economics/economic-impact-gay-marriage-2-5-billion-question">a study released by Nerd Wallet earlier this month</a>, Minnesota could stand to gain $38 million dollars annually in the wedding industry from same-sex marriages. The study estimates around 1,300 same-sex marriages in the state per year, and bases its predictions off of the <a href="http://www.gallup.com/poll/160517/lgbt-percentage-highest-lowest-north-dakota.aspx">2.9 percent of Minnesota’s population who identify as LGBTQ</a> and the state’s average wedding cost of $28,265.</p><p>“This is not only a short-term development,” said the author of the study Sreekar Jasthi. “Many states where same-sex&nbsp;marriage is legal have seen an economic boost as couples plan their unions.”</p><p>Jasthi said same-sex marriages are still new and aren’t the norm yet, so many of the initial marriages were planned quickly and performed at a courthouse, but that could change as soon as it becomes more normal.</p><p>“When same-sex marriage has been legal for several years, our assumption is couples will be able to spend more time planning their weddings,” he said. “And they spend more money on the ceremony.”</p><p>But St. Paul couple Bre Schmidt and Hannah Christensen said even if they could spend a lot of money right now, they wouldn’t want to. “My fiancée’s parents are paying for the wedding,” Schmidt said. “But even if money was not an issue, we would still do it the same way.”</p><p>The couple has already spent $600 on engagement rings and $2,000 on wedding dresses, she said, but the biggest costs for them have still yet to come.</p><p>“The place where we will hold the reception is about $8,000,” Schmidt said. “With the photographer and the DJ, we think it will come down to about $16,000.”</p><p>That’s not including a honeymoon, Schmidt said, which the couple is not planning on going on because of time restraints. “We don’t have the time for a traditional honeymoon because Hannah is a med student,” she said. “If we did, we would probably go to Italy.”</p><p>Garrido said she’s seen a significant increase in her wedding photography business since last summer’s ruling. “Since the legalization of same-sex marriage, I have attended about 15 same-sex weddings,” she said.</p><p>She charges around $2,300 for wedding coverage on average, she said, but her prices vary depending on the size of the ceremony and the number of hours she spends shooting it. She doesn’t recall the exact number, she said, but since the ruling she’s made several thousand more dollars than usual.</p><p>Part of that is because she’s been a LGBT activist for many years, she said, so many same-sex couples come specifically to her when they’re looking for a wedding photographer.</p><p>“The gay weddings have enhanced my schedule,” she said. “Now, I’ve had a slew of new clients that pay my rates. Instead of making a quick $400-$500 at a contract wedding, I’m booking a lot more through my own company now.”</p><p>While it may take some time to truly see how much Minnesota’s economy will gain from legalizing same-sex marriage, Garrido said she thinks it’s clear that it’s a gain for the state.</p><p>“I believe the economy is profiting from same-sex marriage,” she said. “I know it has increased business and profit in many of my fellow wedding vendors. My sales alone have increased by several thousand dollars.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p><em>This story was written by a Twin Cities Daily Planet intern for the TCDP college internship program.&nbsp;<em>This is one of a number of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/interns-and-students">articles produced by student interns</a>&nbsp;at the TC Daily Planet. Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative.</em></em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Jonas Warlich </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/same-sex-marriage-could-increase-minnesota-s-annual-economy-38-m#comments Business CC area same sex marriage Economy Daily Planet Originals Gender/GLBT Local Minnesota Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:50:56 +0000 104049 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net THEATER REVIEW | "Irving Berlin's White Christmas" woos at the Orpheum Theatre https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-irving-berlin-white-christmas-orpheum-theatre <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-irving-berlin-white-christmas-orpheum-theatre" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/26/9_skaters.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/morgan-halaska" title="View user profile.">Morgan Halaska</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <p>For my family, <em>White Christmas</em> is the official start of the holiday season; my sister makes sure we watch it every year the day after Thanksgiving—it’s become a tradition for us. With that said, I went into the opening night <em>of Irving Berlin’s White Christmas The Musical</em> on November 25 at the Orpheum Theatre with a little bit of a bias. It’s near impossible to live up to the bass-baritone Bing Crosby and tap-dancing Danny Kaye, but it’s hardly fair to compare the 1954 classic with the musical. Ultimately, the movie and the travelling production does what it should do and inspires the warm and fuzzies just in time for the holidays.</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-irving-berlin-white-christmas-orpheum-theatre"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For my family, <em>White Christmas</em> is the official start of the holiday season; my sister makes sure we watch it every year the day after Thanksgiving—it’s become a tradition for us. With that said, I went into the opening night <em>of Irving Berlin’s White Christmas The Musical</em> on November 25 at the Orpheum Theatre with a little bit of a bias. It’s near impossible to live up to the bass-baritone Bing Crosby and tap-dancing Danny Kaye, but it’s hardly fair to compare the 1954 classic with the musical. Ultimately, the movie and the travelling production does what it should do and inspires the warm and fuzzies just in time for the holidays.<!--break--></p><p>While there are minor<em>ish</em> plot divergences in the musical, the skeleton of the <em>White Christmas </em>movie plot remains intact. Two army buddies, after serving the 151st division in World War II together, go on to form a successful duet, Wallace and Davis (Davis and Wallace!). Bob Wallace (James Clow, who does his best Bing Crosby voice) is the straight man to Phil Davis’ (Jeremy Benton) fun-loving ladies’ man. The two meet their counterparts in Betty and Judy Haynes (Trista Moldovan and Kaitlyn Davidson), sisters of an old army friend. Phil and Judy click instantly (“The Best Things Happen While You’re Dancing”), while Betty and Bob butt heads. Phil and Judy devise a plan to head north to a ski resort Vermont for Christmas (“Snow”), and come to find out that not only is it 80 degrees there but Phil and Bob’s well-respected commanding officer General Waverly is running the debt-ridden resort. Bob, who’s surprisingly not too sore that he’s in Vermont instead of Florida, arranges for the musical revue to relocate to perform in the resort’s barn in order to bring some business in for the general ("What Can You Do With a General?"). Love burgeons between Bob and Betty, miscommunication ensues ("Love, You Didn't Do Right By Me/How Deep Is the Ocean") and resolves itself (“I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm”), and in the end there’s a “White Christmas.”</p><p>The thing about going into a show with a bias is the hyper-awareness you’ve equipped yourself with (<em>wait, it didn’t happen like that in the movie</em>). The only thing you can do is separate yourself from what you know; the start of Act II helped me distance myself from the classic with “I Love A Piano,” which isn’t a song and number that’s in the movie. Benton, Davidson and the ensemble lay it all out there with their impressive and (literally) breathtaking tap dancing (I overheard a grandmother ask her grandson after the show if she wanted her to buy him tap shoes, to which he said he needed a nap). When Bob and Phil perform Judy and Betty’s act ("Sisters") in Act II (something that happens at the start of the movie), a collective sigh was heard throughout the house (or maybe I’m just projecting); it’s too good of a scene to not carry over, and that's all you can ask for in reproductions.</p><p>The set design, most of all, is what wooed me. Every piece of clothing and prop looked like it could’ve belonged in the 40s and 50s. The train scene, everyone clad in their plaid, is pure eye candy, as well as the closing scene in which performers dressed in red-and-white sweaters danced with snow-covered mountains in the background. And with winter still a fresh in our mind, <em>White Christmas</em> came to Minnesota at the right time to spread some cheer.</p><hr /><p><em>Coverage of issues and events that affect Central Corridor neighborhoods and communities is funded in part by a grant from Central Corridor Funders Collaborative.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2014 Morgan Halaska </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-relatedevent"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/events/irving-berlins-white-christmas">&quot;Irving Berlin&#039;s White Christmas&quot; at the Orpheum Theatre</a> </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/arts/2014/11/26/theater-review-irving-berlin-white-christmas-orpheum-theatre#comments CC area Arts Entertainment Theater Daily Planet Originals Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:47:26 +0000 104044 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net Tom Heuerman: Evolved people or real-life zombies? https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/evolved-people-or-real-life-zombies <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/tom-heuerman-phd" title="View user profile.">Tom Heuerman PhD</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Community Voices </div> </div> </div> <p>In <em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/31/opinion/david-brooks-our-machine-masters.html?partner=rssnyt&amp;emc=rss">Our Machine Masters</a>,</em> New York Times columnist David Brooks imagi</p> <span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/26/evolved-people-or-real-life-zombies"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In <em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/31/opinion/david-brooks-our-machine-masters.html?partner=rssnyt&amp;emc=rss">Our Machine Masters</a>,</em> New York Times columnist David Brooks imagined two futures for us in the age of artificial intelligence: a humanistic scenario in which, freed from mental drudgery, people focus on personal and moral faculties: being likable, industrious, trustworthy and affectionate. In the age of AI, “…we’re not human because we have big brains. We’re human because we have social skills, emotional capacities and moral intuitions.”</p> <blockquote><p><strong>This is a Community Voices submission</strong> and is moderated but not edited. The opinions expressed by Community Voices contributors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the TC Daily Planet.</p> </blockquote> <p>Or, in Brook’s utilitarian scenario, people become less idiosyncratic. The machines replace us as decision-makers. We conform and do what the machines tell us to do without question. Kevin Kelly wrote in <em>Wired </em>magazine: “As we invent more species of AI, we will be forced to surrender more of what is supposedly unique about humans. The greatest benefit of the arrival of artificial intelligence is that AIs will help define humanity. We need AIs to tell us who we are.”</p> <p>Will we flourish in this new world of artificial intelligence or will we become real-life zombies? Or will we just muddle along?</p> <p>In 2005, I wrote an essay on the Singularity: A superior humanity—artificially created. Genetics, robotics and nanotechnology fed by the exponentially increasing power and speed of information technology intertwine and multiply one another in symbiotic relationships.</p> <p>As entities with greater than human intelligence are created, most intelligence of the planet will become nonbiological and changes in all other aspects of life will accelerate dramatically—including the more rapid creation of even more intelligent entities on a shorter time scale.</p> <p>Will these technologies free us of the mundane, help us live longer and healthier lives, and extend our human capabilities? Will we solve all problems and become God? Scientist Ray Kurzweil: “We see exponentially greater love.”</p> <p>Or will we turn into genetically programmed and soulless beings, our minds filled with information downloaded from computers, living out predetermined lives in service of the machines with no ability to control our own destinies and with those things that make us indefinably human altered, ruptured, or destroyed?</p> <p>We cannot stop or control this development. If we push development underground it will only free the technology from ethical and moral considerations. The technology and its impact on our lives and the potential impact on the human soul will not be stopped.</p> <p>For 300 years humanists have railed against the mechanistic world view and the unintended consequences of a philosophy that dehumanizes people. The critical challenge of our lifetime may well be to use explosive technical development to preserve and enhance our humanity rather than to have humanity neutered or destroyed by the mindless acceleration of technology without thought as to the unintended consequences.</p> <p>Instead of being led by technology, we can lead technology. To do so we must accelerate our maturity as people and communities and bring forth a creative renaissance of relationships that will transform life on this planet. We must embrace the technology that threatens our humanity and outfox the creative dark side of human nature with the creative light of our humanity. The spiritual must transcend the technical; people must transcend machines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ©2014 Tom Heuerman </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/26/evolved-people-or-real-life-zombies#comments Artificial Intelligence David Brooks Kevin Kelly Ray Kurzwell science and technology The Singularity Community Voices Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:49:47 +0000 104041 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net Hundreds block Lake and Minnehaha, non-indictment protest grows to thousands https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/25/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-indictment <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/25/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-indictment" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/25/111111.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-credit"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/profiles/ktigue" title="View user profile.">Kristoffer Tigue</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> TC Daily Planet </div> </div> </div> <div class="storify"><em>If the Storify story doesn't appear, refresh your browser.</em></div><div class="storify">&nbsp;</div><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/tcdailyplanet/hundreds-bl</div></iframe></div><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/25/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-indictment"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="storify"><em>If the Storify story doesn't appear, refresh your browser.</em></div><div class="storify">&nbsp;</div><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/tcdailyplanet/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-of/embed?border=false" frameborder="no" width="100%" height="750"></iframe><script type="text/javascript" src="//storify.com/tcdailyplanet/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-of.js?border=false"></script><noscript>[&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="//storify.com/tcdailyplanet/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-of" target="_blank"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;View the story "Hundreds block Lake and Minnehaha, protest lack of indictment" on Storify&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;]</noscript></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Kristoffer Tigue </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/25/hundreds-block-lake-and-minnehaha-protest-lack-indictment#comments #Ferguson Darren Wilson Mike Brown minneapolis police misconduct Daily Planet Originals Local Minnesota National Public Safety Race/Ethnicity Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:00:24 +0000 104031 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net Louie's Wine Dive in Uptown is making its mark; hitting the spot with foodies https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/25/louies-wine-dive-uptown-making-its-mark-hitting-spot-foodies <div class="field field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/news/2014/11/25/louies-wine-dive-uptown-making-its-mark-hitting-spot-foodies" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel imagecache-linked imagecache-frontpanel_linked"><img src="https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/imagecache/frontpanel/14/25/louies_wine_dive.jpg" alt="" title="" width="600" height="440" class="imagecache imagecache-frontpanel"/></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-media-partner-link"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Insight News </div> </div> </div> <p>"Sometimes it's not you that needs a change, it's your environment that needs the change."</p><span class="read-more"><a href="/news/2014/11/25/louies-wine-dive-uptown-making-its-mark-hitting-spot-foodies"><strong>MORE &raquo;</strong></a></span><div class="field field-article-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"Sometimes it's not you that needs a change, it's your environment that needs the change."<!--break--></p><p>That's about the only way to explain why in 2001 a chef born and raised in warm and sunny Miami made the "radical" decision to move to the less than warm metropolis of Minneapolis. So that's what Chef Patrick Matthews did; and the growing legion of fans of his menu creations at Louie's Wine Dive, 800 W. Lake St., Uptown Minneapolis, are thankful for the decision.</p><p>Louie's (<a href="http://www.louieswinedive.com/minneapolis">www.louieswinedive.com/minneapolis</a>) opened this past May to rave reviews with foodies loving Matthews' take on classic American comfort cuisine. Though the menu at Louie's is ever evolving – "I just love to get in the kitchen and create," explained Matthews, the chef and co-owner of Louie's – staples and foodie favorites are the braised short ribs, crab cakes, shrimp diablo and the grilled bone in pork loin chop (just seeing one of those coming out of the kitchen immediately turns heads).</p><blockquote><p><em>This article is reposted from TCDP media partner <a href="http://insightnews.com">Insight News</a>. Check out the links below for other recent Insight News stories:</em></p><ul><li><a href="http://insightnews.com/news/12856-flowers-mobilize-engage-citizens"><em>Flowers: Mobilize, engage citizens</em></a></li><li><a href="http://insightnews.com/news/12859-pointergate-kstp-should-be-ashamed-for-racist-reporting"><em>POINTERGATE: KSTP should be ashamed for racist reporting</em></a></li></ul></blockquote><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/patrick_at_louies.jpg" width="280" height="222" style="float: left; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />Matthew's, who has a degree in culinary arts from Johnson &amp; Wales in Miami, said coming to Minneapolis was just what he needed to do to grow as a chef and as a person.</p><p>"Minneapolis was a logical place for me to come and to learn from some great chefs and it also gave me a chance to stand out," said Matthews.</p><p>The list of great chefs and restaurants Matthews worked with and at is certainly impressive. Matthews has done kitchen time – mostly in the demanding role of sous chef – at some well-known places, including Wolfgang Puck's 2021, Babalu's, Axel's Bonfire (Roseville), Crave (downtown Minneapolis), the Dakota Jazz Club and Aperitif Restaurant. At Aperitif, Matthews was the executive chef and under his directions the restaurant was named to the 2010 list of Best Things to do in the Twin Cities.</p><p>"Around then (mid 2000s) this was a great time. This was the time when the bigtime chefs were taking an interest in the area," said Matthews' who worked under Puck and other known chefs such as Jack Riebel (Dakota). "All those experiences translate to the things we do here at Louie's."</p><p>Though Matthews dreamed of opening his own place, becoming chef and co-owner of Louie's came out of nowhere.</p><p><img src="/sites/tcdailyplanet.net/files/2014/November/patrick_at_louies_meat.jpg" width="280" height="280" style="float: right; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px;" />"For me it was kind of a chance happening," explained Matthews. "I had a conversation with a guy from Kansas City (where the Louie's brand started) and the conversation was about pride over profits. A short time after that I was offered the opportunity to become chef and part owner. At the time I was working at the St. James Hotel and it was a pretty good position for me, but I decided to take a chance. I decided it was time to step out from the shadows so to speak."</p><p>With a prime location on Lake Street next to the iconic Bryant-Lake Bowl, Matthews (and Louie's) is far from the shadows. Anchoring a newly-built luxury apartment complex, Louie's has become a neighborhood hangout, but diners from far beyond Uptown are regularly making their way to Louie's for lunch, happy hour, dinner or weekend brunch. And as the name suggest, Louie's has an extensive wine selection (as well as a full bar) and an on-site sommelier (a trained wine professional) to suggest food and wine pairings and discuss all things wine related. Thursday through Saturday evenings Chef Matthews offers four course dining with accompanying wine pairings.</p><p>"What I want Louie's to become is an institution where people can come as they are and commune over a nice plate of food," said Matthews.</p><p><strong>Louie's Wine Dive</strong><br />800 W. Lake St., Uptown<br />(612) 824-3483<br /><a href="http://www.louieswinedive.com/minneapolis">www.louieswinedive.com/minneapolis</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-img-copyright"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> © 2014 Insight News </div> </div> </div> https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/11/25/louies-wine-dive-uptown-making-its-mark-hitting-spot-foodies#comments Food and restaurants Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:22:26 +0000 Harry Colbert, Jr. 104027 at https://www.tcdailyplanet.net