“Django Unchained” in Minnesota: On northerners seeing (and not seeing) the south

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3 thoughts on ““Django Unchained” in Minnesota: On northerners seeing (and not seeing) the south

  1. Jack Cozzens’ comment is interesting because the term “racist” is such a loaded word. Typically, the word is used as an epithet and blurted out. It is often meant to disrupt whatever else is going on. It is not a word used to qualify a noun in a complimentary way. 

    After seeing the movie, I imagine that Mr Cozzens might mean that the director Mr Tarrantino is a racist in support of anti-White sentiments of African-Americans. 

    As usual, Mr Tarrantino has worked diligently and artfully in creating his film. He has a remarkable talent in so many things. The one talent that gets the most attention is his ability to make audiences so uncomfortable as to provoke high-visibility controversy. The screening I attended was almost sold out. There were many African-Americans in the audience but the vast majority of the audience was White.

    The sympathetic character of Dr. King Schultz was compromised by the fact that he killed people for money (bounty hunter) and that he taught Django to kill. Django becomes a professional bounty hunter during the course of the story and restrains himself, repeatedly, from killing for vengeance. 

    That restraint gives away, is unchained, in the coda of the film. Dr. Schultz is killed after murdering a horrendous slave owner. Django reacts and ends up killing the man who kills Dr. Schultz and proceeds to take on the (up until now) hidden horde of armed guards. Where did they all come from? He ultimately surrenders and is sent to his death in the mines. 

    Django unchains himself with guile (lying) and violence (killing Australian guards taking him to the mines). He takes revenge on the slave owners. And Tarrantino has proceeded to cut through a gauntlet of ethical and legal quandries with all barrels blasting. 

    Is this film racist? It depicts horrible racism. It depicts vengeance (justified or not). It depicts depravity. It depicts the truth of slavery rarely seen on film. It has a “happy” ending with the hero and his rescued bride riding off on horses into the sunrise. Is “Django Unchained” the opposite of the racist but great film, “Birth of a Nation?” I don’t think this film is racist in comparison with D.W. Griffith’s film. It is a violent and vivid revenge fantasy. I don’t think it is racist, however.

  2. Responding to Randall Davidson’s response to Jack Cuzzen’s comment; Mr. Davidson is attempting to pull a sort of “Jedi mind trick” on readers. You see Mr. Cuzzen never accused anyone of BEING a racist, as Mr. Davidson alleges in his response.

    Mr. Cuzzen simply states his opinion: “This movie is pure RACISM! Anyone who approves of it should be ashamed that they can condone such pure hatred of one race. RACISM is wrong no matter which way it goes!

    I disagree the movie is PURE racism, because that would trivialize a very real and oppressive system actively operating today. I would correct him by saying Hollywood is Pure racism, and everything coming out of the factory upholds a detestable system of white domination, and plays of the “fear fantasy” of white people.

    Whereas Mr. Davidson seeks to seperate Django unchained from the  “great film” Birth of a Nation, as not being “racist”, I disagree here too. I see both films (Birth of a Nation and Django unchained) are both race baiting films, using White fear, and   Black males to uphold racial ignorance and hostilities.

     Mr. Davidson said:

    “Jack Cozzens’ comment is interesting because the term “racist” is such a loaded word. Typically, the word is used as an epithet and blurted out. It is often meant to disrupt whatever else is going on. It is not a word used to qualify a noun in a complimentary way.”

    I challenge Mr. Davidson and others to consider that when someone says that racism could be in operation in any situation…it very well may be.

    A person attempting to “disrupt” the system of white domination, is a compliment to our humanity.

     

  3. The south has a new face and it is stilled filled with many injustices. I will not make this long but I will make a few points. The south is now more of a socially screwed up place than its ever been. Its more about placism. That is keeping people from reaching a certain place in society. It also about discrimination on jobs and in the work place. Many minorities in the south work in rural areas have factory jobs in which white managers run like plantations. When a minority worker makes a mistake they fire them or give them a hard time. Everytime a management position comes open they fill the job witha new white guy who knows nothing to come oversee minorities who been on the job for years. The judicial system gives minority offenders double the time they give a white offenders for the same crime or often turn a blind eye to certain white collar crimes. The banks in the south are less willing to work minorities homebuyers who have borderline credit as to where they are giving opportunites to others. The south has made strides but its still has many more to make.

    The Southern Gentlemen

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