Private sector to the rescue?

As a newly minted think tank fellow seven years ago, I heard Bob Poole, the libertarian Reason Foundation's thoughtful and nonpartisan transportation expert, argue in a local luncheon speech that private investment offered the only feasible way out of America's chronic shortfall in funding roads, bridges, transit and other ways of getting around.

MORE »

Open Streets Minneapolis – Sustainable transportation, Seward businesses and even cute dogs

Well, the Open Streets Minneapolis Franklin Avenue event was certainly a success. It was filled with local produce, Seward businesses, bicyclists, pedestrians, Nice Rides, concessionaires, cute dogs, a puppet show and even a player piano. Rain did clear some people out but that didn’t happen until well over 4 hours into it.

MORE »

Bike ride offers tour of Minnesota's African American history

(Photo courtesy of Major Taylor Bicycling Club) Major Taylor Bicycling Club participants

Saturday, August 23, presents a great opportunity to have an historical experience relative to the African American communities’ presence in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Major Taylor Bicycling Club is offering its Second Annual Dark 2 Dawn: A Ride Through African American History.

MORE »

A transit adventure from Big Lake to Apple Valley

Our transit maps are getting more colored lines! We now have three different routes in the METRO system, plus a commuter rail line.

MORE »

A tale of two bike paths

*Comments here are in my individual capacity and not representative of the Jordan Area Community Council*

Over the past few weeks, I've had the opportunity to attend a neighborhood events where bike path options have been brought forward--a presentation by the city of Minneapolis about 26th Avenue North, and a Jordan Area Community Council listening session on the Humboldt/Irving Avenue proposal. While I could go into elaborate detail about each project, that's a topic for another post or two. Instead, what intrigues me as of late is the community perception of each plan.

MORE »

U of M study finds MnPASS shockwaves work well

Apparently, there's something MnDOT calls  “shockwaves” that occur when motorists approach the looney-laned, muti-messaged, maniac sign montages found in conjunction with the MnPASS lanes on 35W and 394.  According to a so-called “study” by some Highway Department scam at the the University of Minnesota called the Minnesota Traffic Observatory, the “shockwaves” “work well.”

MORE »

A one-sided fight over St. Paul's streets

Under pressure from the City Council last week, St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman outlined a $54 million street-improvement program—more than 10 percent of his proposed $515 million operating budget for 2015. Hizzoner thus significantly raised a group of rebellious council members' bid of $22 million for streets after they likened his earlier plan to "putting a Band-Aid on a broken hip."

MORE »

Consider the humble — but ever nimble — bus!

On the Monday after the blast-off of the Green Line I stopped at a bus shelter for a quick transfer, rejoicing that I was making my way across town – by bus – in record time. As I waited on that sun-drenched morning an elderly gentleman stopped by the shelter to check the new bus route routes and schedules. After a quick perusal of his expanded transit options he declared, “I’m just going to ride ALL of those new routes, just to see where they really do go!”

MORE »

Green Line, green lights

Suppose you have a train moving along (parallel to) an East-West (EW) signalized arterial.

MORE »

Squaring a triangle: Rethinking Franklin/Cedar/Minnehaha in Seward

For decades, the Franklin/Cedar/Minnehaha area of northwest Seward has been a thorny area, confusing for cars, unsafe for pedestrians, and generally lacking in the urban amenities residents of most Minneapolis neighborhoods desire. Though the area has had an LRT station on the blue line for 10 years now, little has changed where the three streets come together, with only one redevelopment (Seward Common) just now being built. A long-term vision from the Seward neighborhood aims to address this, but largely leaves the the root transportation problems of the Franklin/Cedar/Minnehaha area intact.

MORE »
Syndicate content