Babe's new diet: Nanomaterials in animal feed

How much would you pay for a pork chop that was two percent leaner? Would you eat such a pork chop if nanoscale minerals were mixed into the hog feed to achieve that two percent reduction? Such questions are before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as it considers what to advise the animal feed and mineral supplement industry about their efforts to incorporate atomic- to molecular-sized materials into feed.

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SuperValu announces closure; City moves to redevelop Nicollet

(Photos by Stephanie Fox) A SuperValu cashier works around the clock during the weekend closeout; Below, by Sunday, Sept. 14, almost all fresh produce had been sold.

Last week, the signs announcing that Sullivan’s SuperValu at Lake and Nicollet was closing were small so many people didn’t notice. But by Sunday, word spread that everything was 50 percent off and people were grabbing anything they could.

“It’s a controlled riot,” a security guard joked.

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MUSIC REVIEW | Real Phonic Radio returns to Hill Library with Augie Meyers, Broke Down Dollys and Erik Koskinen

Photos by Ann Treacy

After a summer hiatus, Real Phonic Radio returned to the James J Hill Library for their monthly show of local and national country-flavored music performed on the third Thursday of the month. This month Augie Meyers headlined.

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A Frogtown feast: Thousands gather to discuss food access in St. Paul

(Photos by Andy King)

Not everyone thinks about their food as art, but one St. Paul artist is using art to spread awareness about food access issues in his neighborhood.

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Farming into the future: Hmong American Farm

“Farmers often work twelve-hour days,” Yao Yang explained. Having water available near the field is a big deal. That’s often not the case on rented fields, but it’s an important part of the Hmong American Farm. So are the simple washing sheds where they can prepare produce for market, and the cooler where produce can be stored until it’s picked up for delivery.

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Farm-Faith Project gives Hmong immigrants gardening space at churches

(MinnPost photos by Ibrahim Hirsi) Khoua Vang harvests vegetables she grew at Hope Lutheran Church garden.

Khoua Vang carefully tiptoed Saturday in a vegetable-covered garden outside Hope Lutheran Church in St. Paul and went down on her knees to reap dozens of Japanese sweet potatoes.

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Seward Cafe at 40

The Seward Café, which turns 40 years old some time this year, is a study in contradictions. Although it’s known for its longevity, laying claim to being both the oldest collectively-managed business in the Twin Cities and the oldest collectively-managed restaurant/-café in the U.S., its actual collectives seem to turn over completely about every seven years. Although the café has never been totally vegetarian (the principle is even enshrined in its charter), it has always remained a favorite among vegans and vegetarians. This is probably due to its great range of vegan baked goods and its adherence to an ethos of care with its veg customers by assuring careful separation in the kitchen and full disclosure of ingredients. And further, although it looks small and scruffy and like anything but a gourmet haven, some of its food items are nearly legendary in their greatness. And its amazing survival attests to its success with the public.

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SUPPERTIME | A little comfort at Kindee

Suppertime is a blog in comics form, exploring local restaurants, bars and other food establishments in and around the Twin Cities. I eat, I talk, I draw.

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IGGERS DIGEST | Great ribs, great deal: Lee's & Dee's Bar-B-Que Express

Lee's & Dee's Barbeque Express, 161 N. Victoria St., St. Paul

I didn't run into Ice-T, Ice Cube, Patti Labelle or Torii Hunter when I stopped in for ribs at Lee's & Dee's Bar-B-Que Express, but over the 22 years that the little BBQ joint has been in business, it has seen its share of celebrities.

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Turning beer into food: Jacquie Berglund's company, FINNEGANS, does well doing good

(Photo by Sarah Whiting) "It's social, it's fun and you meet a lot of community-minded people. ... You make a difference." -- Jacquie Berglund

Sitting on a couch in her office, amid pillows bearing the slogans "Irish Holy Water" and "Drink Like You Care," Jacquie Berglund reflected on her initial career forays - good jobs, just not the right fit. After graduating from Augsburg College, she worked for a recruiting firm - "my first taste of business," she recalls. "I loved it, but it didn't have enough meaning. I think I'm just hardwired for [meaningful work]."

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